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Opinion

  • In response to the article pertaining to the ILHS graduation, we have to say that the way the “uncertainty” period and decision-making was handled is not as written in the article.

    In the news release, it appears the school administrators had everything under control and that there was no reason for concern on the students’ or parents’ part, when, in fact, the administrators were fumbling with their process on how to handle the situation and were the ones who put the students “up in arms” over graduation.

  • The Catawba River has just been placed at the very top of the most endangered rivers list. The Catawba is a lifeline for this state as it is for other states. From wildlife to businesses this river is most essential. We are talking about our environment, we only get one Earth.

  • This year’s Indian Land High School graduation ceremony has become one big headache for everyone involved – the Class of 2008, their parents and school administrators.

    The school planned to hold the event at Byrnes Auditorium at Winthrop University, as it has done for the last several years. But this year, Byrnes is undergoing renovations, so it isn’t available. But there was some miscommunication and the high school didn’t realize it didn’t have a graduation venue until March.

  • In Wynette Burchfield’s letter, “Election is not a popularity contest,” in the April 27 edition of The Lancaster News, some statements were made that might give people the wrong impression of Discovery School.

  • OK, we admit it – we don’t quite get it. Lancaster County Council’s consideration of an ordinance that would declare three areas just outside the city of Lancaster as “prostitution-free zones” just doesn’t quite make sense to us.

    Prostitution-free zone? Who came up with phrase and concept? It’s something we’ve never heard of and, frankly, wouldn’t have thought Lancaster County needed.

  • I support S.C. Rep. Mick Mulvaney for the District 45 Senate seat. My experience with him has been consistently marked by his unbridled energy, enthusiasm and interest in his being a representative to all his constituents.

    Coupled with his energy, interest and enthusiasm is a forward-looking, fiscally conservative insight into the political process and the sometimes questionable practices by some of our lawmakers. For example, witness the recent back-door pay raise that Mulvaney helped defeat.

  • To the brave team who took the John Deere mower from our yard, you should be ashamed. If you knew us, you would not have taken from us. We would have given you the shirt from our backs, but you would have known that, had you known us.

  • I just read that the dog tethering bill passed the S.C. Senate. I am absolutely livid.

    How dare so many responsible dog owners be lumped into a bill that is geared to reduce dogfighting. This is totally against my rights. I understand that the government wants to rid the state of dogfighting, but this is unconstitutional.

    What about all of us who tether our dogs during the day and release them all night to guard our livestock? What about all of us who have our hunting dogs on trolley systems until the hunt? These are loved working dogs.

  • Can you name one person who has not been exposed to some type of violence? In today’s society it is normal for all of us to be exposed to some type of violence.

    Violence is displayed in or outside of your home. It is depicted through television, video games or simple everyday living. There is no escaping it.

  • Gonze Lee Twitty’s recent Pioneer Award from the NAACP is most fitting for a man who has put others first in his life of service.

    Twitty, 89, has lived a productive life of paving the way for others in need of a helping hand.

    “He’s been out there for a long time helping those who can’t help themselves,” said Charlene McGriff, second vice president of the local NAACP and a member of the committee which selected the winners.

  • Over the past few years, I believe that the Lancaster Recreation Department would agree with me in saying that soccer has become one of the fastest growing sports in this area. With this growth have come many exciting opportunities for the youth of this area. My daughter, who has played soccer for the last five years, has had the unique fortune to be a part of one such experience.

    This year Lancaster organized a Futbol club to promote youth soccer at a higher level. My 11-year-old has been fortunate enough to be a member of this club in its opening season.

  • In the past year, we’ve been reminded more than once what an important resource the Catawba River is – not only to us in Lancaster County, but to residents of many counties in both South Carolina and North Carolina.

    First there was the drought that took hold last summer and brought water-use restrictions to communities in both Carolinas that draw water from the Catawba. Then there were the water wars that erupted between North and South Carolina after the cities of Concord and Kannapolis in North Carolina proposed to draw 10 million gallons a day from the river.

  • Selfish – prepared to sacrifice the feelings, needs, etc. of others to satisfy ones own desires.

    It is curious that Jeffery Donahue would use that word to describe those who do not favor school vouchers in his April 18 letter to the editor “Parents who want best for kids not ‘elitists.’ ”

  • In Shannon Catoe’s letter, “Citizens face worse issues that threat of vouchers” in the April 27 edition of The Lancaster News, she uses slight of hand and sleaziness to refer to Mandy Powers-Norell as “out of touch and foolish.” It seems Ms. Catoe has a hard time believing that the masses are really that concerned about school vouchers. In several conversations that I’ve had, vouchers are indeed the “hot button item.”

  • You’ve seen the latest headlines gaudily splashed across all the media about the food crisis. In this prosperous country, we usually associate a food crisis with a continent like Africa with its endless civil wars and famines or some other exotic location where a tsunami just hit or some massive mudslide.

  • The Humane Society of Lancaster County Inc. would like to give a very heartfelt thank you to all those who helped make our first Fur Ball a huge success.

    There are so many to thank that I won’t be able to list them all. So if you are not mentioned, please know that we know who you are and the omission is one of space only.

  • What profession should be considered when starting or changing a career? Becoming an administrative professional is a solid choice for the future, according to the latest figures from the U.S. Dept. of Labor.

    More than 4.2 million people were employed as administrative assistants and secretaries in 2006, with another 362,000 jobs expected to be added by 2016, an 8.5 percent increase over the 10-year period.

  • I want to respond to Jeffery Donahue’s letter “Parents who want best for kids not elitists” in the April 18 edition of The Lancaster News.

    No one is being selfish at all. It is just that everyone can’t afford to send their children to private schools. My children have learned perfectly fine for the last five years and are on honor roll. They are not being rushed to learn. That is why they have after-school programs.

  • On behalf of Springs Memorial Hospital, we are very proud to be associated with the third annual Child Safety Day, which will be held on June 7.

    As responsible citizens, parents, community leaders and community members, it is the responsibility of all to promote the awareness of safety of our future – our youth.

    On June 7, many agencies and businesses from our community will take time out of their busy schedules to educate local youth and their parents on different ways that safety can be ensured in everyday life.

  • Lt. Gov. Andre Bauer answers questions about aging issues.

    Question: When I was watching the news the other evening, I saw the reporter talking about the government making a law that would change how television works. They said that if you didn’t have cable television, your TV would not work any more and that you would have to get a new set. Will my television really quit working next year?