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Opinion

  • Located on West Dunlap Street just across from the historic Lancaster Courthouse is the Lancaster Area Literacy Cooperative. Its purpose is pretty much reflective in its name. It’s obvious when you walk into the office. Book shelves line the walls, a room is filled with computers and dedicated employees try to improve the local literacy rate.

  • The people of Lancaster are speaking loudly. Yet City Council and other elected officials don’t seem to hear. What citizens want are answers, explanations and absolution for what can only be described as the most unwarranted decision this decade.

    The termination of Detective Pat Parsons is unfair in itself, and though it can be rectified by his reinstatement, I fear the damage has already been done.

  • Is there something wrong with our judicial system?

    Last October, a person was stopped for speeding on Pageland Highway, charged with possession of a controlled substance with intent to distribute, possession of marijuana and unlawful carrying of a pistol. The officer found marijuana, a bag of prescription pill bottles, a bag with $9,280 in cash and a gun.

    Do you think this person is suffering the consequences? No, he was recommended for pre-trial intervention (PTI).

    Again, I ask, is something wrong with our system?

    Milbry Johnson

  • Yes, it’s that time of the season again. No, not the beginning of springtime, although that season is now upon us after an unusually wet and cold winter.

    Most folks are probably glad that spring is here and the days are warmer and longer and the first spring flowers are starting to bloom. It’s not just the beginning of spring, though.

    It’s also the beginning of political season – at least the official beginning of the political season, as candidate filing for the elective offices that are open this year started March 16.

  • The dark building was filled to capacity. Loud music was in the air. Young children, teenagers and adults were all in attendance.

    There was excitement, laughter, clapping, singing and one lone black light shown through the darkness. This was the scene that took place on Jan. 3, at Sand Hill Baptist Church in Kershaw.

    The Sand Hill Baptist Puppet Team was presenting their black light spectacular performance. This 10-year ministry began with a small seed that God turned into a garden.

  • In response to Sheri Wright’s column in last week’s paper, “Edenmoor to blame for flooding?,” let me start by answering her first question.

    Your guess is incorrect. I do not live in Sun City Carolina Lakes; I live in rural Lancaster County – I like to call it Indian Land. I have lived in Indian Land for 17 years and went to IL schools all of my life.

  • When the first South Carolina Freedom of Information Act was introduced in the House of Representatives in 1971, the bill stated that “The General Assembly finds that it is vital in a democratic society that public business be performed in an open and public manner….”  The purpose of this openness is to allow citizens to “be advised of the performance of public officials… the decisions…reached and…the formulation of public policy.”

  • Sara Eddins must be running for re-election because it seems she is buying votes by pushing for a raise for city employees. With the unemployment rate at 20 or 30 percent, everyone needs a job and a raise these days. Many of us need an extra job, too.

    If city employees think they can get a better job elsewhere, then they should go for it. They are not going to leave because there are no jobs out there yet. No one is getting a cost-of-living raise and everyone who has a job has seen the cost of health care go up.

  • I recently read an article on teacher furloughs. That is the stupidest move yet. I have been laid off and so have other some other folks. We have been forced to go back to school. It seems tougher now than I ever remember. Education is pushed at us everywhere you look. We are told to keep our kids in school. How is this to be possible when teachers are being furloughed? Our children are not getting the education they need now from overcrowded classrooms. There’s no more one-on-one. That’s vital to students, including me. Teachers are not getting a fair deal.  

  • In response to all of the recent attention and controversy at Edenmoor, I just had to add one more angle to it.

  • As sheriff of Lancaster County, I would like to discuss an issue very close to each of us – crime prevention. My office is committed to making our neighborhoods safer places to live.

    By doing so, we will improve the quality of life for individuals and families – both young and old. It is imperative that we seek progress to reduce the negative influences that crime has on our children and to help safeguard the elderly.

  • I would like to start my story about my son and how we got him. We have had him since he was  9 months old. My husband and I had decided to adopt our little boy. On Feb. 8, 2008, his paw-paw died after a long illness. In March 2008, his real mother left again. On Sept. 29, 2008, my husband, who is the only real dad he had, also died.

  • City Council recruits residents to serve on a voluntary committee. The members of the committee give their time to attend meetings and review certain issues.

    There are committees for zoning issues, zoning appeals and the city’s hospitality tax, for example.

  • To all South Carolina residents: Now is the time to contact your state representatives to let them know we do not want to increase daily tonnage of trash and garbage that can be incinerated in our state.

    This could open the door for a great deal more trash to be imported from other states, both near and far.

    There is a reason we limited garbage that can be burned in our state, but Sen. Creighton Coleman is about to introduce legislation that will increase it from 600 tons to 1,600 tons a day, and he is doing it in the name of green energy.

  • Indian Land Middle School has been in the limelight a lot lately. The school stepped into the national spotlight last month when it was named a National School to Watch, an honor given to high-performing middle schools.

    ILMS is one of two schools in the state to win the honor this year and one of just six in the state to ever receive it.

    Fewer than 350 schools in the nation have received the designation since its inception in 1999.

  • My husband has been in the hospital four times since December. We would like to take this opportunity to thank Springs Memorial Hospital for going the extra mile to make sure he had the best of care.

    First, we would like to thank Lancaster County EMS for its prompt and wonderful service. We would like to thank the doctors for the knowledge and their extra effort to diagnose and treat my husband.

  • Editor’s note: The following is See Lancaster’s response to Gil Small’s Feb. 24 letter, “Santa Train event was a disappointment.”

    Dear Gil, Nancy and Anne:

    On behalf of the Santa Express and the city of Lancaster, I want to thank you for your letter and comments. Please note that we work hard each year to provide an exciting and memorable experience for our fine city and community.

  • Winning a state championship is special. Winning two state championships is extra special.

    That’s just what happened at the Class A-AA state wrestling tournament in Rock Hill late last month.

    Buford High School senior 130-pounder Rashad Cunningham capped a 46-1 mat season, winning the state title in his weight class.

    Indian Land’s Trevor Jones, in the 140-pound weight class, did the same as he captured the state crown.

    Both wrestlers achieved the ultimate goal for a high school wrestler in exciting fashion.

  • A local developer got his way with the city of Lancaster last week. Just as area residents of Arrowood Estates were in an uproar about the annexation of four neighboring properties and the slim reality of their own annexation, a very real deal was quietly completed for a property across town.

  • Jobs. Jobs. Jobs. That’s the hot topic of discussion. Over the past 10 years, we have lost close to 10,000 jobs with the closing of Springs Industries. This has caused great hardship on the local citizens as they scramble to find a replacement for their lost income.

    The Lancaster County Economic Development Corp., Lancaster County Council, the city of Lancaster and all of the employment agencies have been working overtime to attract new industries to our county. This is not an easy task, but we continue to go after all those that show an interest in moving here.