.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Opinion

  • The birth of conservatism is the same date as the birth of America. From the Declaration of Independence, “We hold these truths to be self-evident that all men are created equal; that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights; that among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.”

    This very statement gives us  the three main principles of conservatism, that is, our belief in a creator, in his creation and in God-given moral absolutes.

  • I would like to thank Sgt. Dale Johnson with the Lancaster Police Department. Mr. Johnson handled a recent incident between Michael and Melenia Trotter and the Big Lots manager at the store.

    Mr. Johnson is to be commended. He handled the situation very professionally and Police Chief Hugh White should be glad he is on his staff.

    Again,  thank you Mr. Johnson for being so helpful.

    Melenia and Michael

    Trotter

    Great Falls

  • I have heard a lot of talk about the new judicial center, also known as the courthouse, much of which has been positive but a great deal which can described as critical and/or questioning.

    Perhaps the most descriptive talk about the judicial center is the size. Now while I use the term judicial center it should be pointed out that much of this facility is for nonjudicial categories.

    In that I mean that our system of government which is much like the federal government in which we have three branches, executive, legislative and judicial.

  • I would like to comment on how beautiful the area is around the “Welcome to Lancaster” sign across from Lancaster Motors on U.S. 521. It took a lot of work, time and talent to convert a vacant area into something so beautiful.

    Lancaster should be proud of this and sit up and take notice.

    I do not know who is responsible for this, but give yourselves a big pat on the back for a job well done.

    Nancy Crolley

    Lancaster

  • The Paws in the Panhandle story in the April 7 edition of The Lancaster News contained some incorrect information.

    The very first sentence, which said, “Over 5,000 animals have been euthanized at the county shelter in the past year,” is way off the mark. If the writer had checked the facts or if Gloria Davey, director and founder of Paws in the Panhandle, had given correct info, that would not have been a problem.

  • I don’t believe any other town in South Carolina experienced such a horrendous act as the Buford Massacre, during the Revolutionary War.

    Yet no other has been so totally negligent in showing care and respect for the boys who died because they came to help South Carolina be free from the rule of their mother country.

    Records state the Buford Massacre caused people to realize if they didn’t take up arms and help, they would be under the same harsh rule they had come here to be free of.

  • The Kershaw Chamber of Commerce would like to thank everyone who participated in the Kershaw Spring-A-Thon this year.

    It was through the efforts of many that made this another successful year.

    We would like to thank our sponsors, Haile Gold Mine, Stevens Foundation, town of Kershaw, Founders Federal Credit Union, Kershaw News Era, First Citizens Bank, Gus’ House of Pizza, attorney Robert Davis, Dr. John Howell and Small’s Food Center.

  • After a marathon 18-hour session that ended about 5 a.m. May 7, the S.C. Senate passed its version of the 2010-2011 budget.

    I voted against it, for numerous reasons.

  • As the fans filed out of the high school basketball game last season, an elderly lady stopped and said, “Robert, those articles you write about your family, keep on doing that. We really like them.”

    If so, and I believe it because I hear it often, then you get a double Howey dose today.

    Today is graduation for the Lancaster County class of 2010.

  • School’s out. Businesses are closed. The smell of grills drifting over the neighborhood. For many people it’s a three-day weekend. And it’s the beginning of summer.

    With all the excitement going on it is easy to forget why we have this weekend.

    But the truth is this holiday cost the lives of many people. Memorial Day is a day set aside to pay tribute and honor to those who paid the ultimate price for our freedom.

  • For 2010 Lancaster County high school graduates, today is the day.

    Ask any of those 766 graduates at Andrew Jackson, Buford, Indian Land and Lancaster high schools about that today and you will likely get a wide smile and a reply like, “That’s it. The big day.”

    You can wager that mortar board tassel that a pumped fist, or a high five will likely follow.

  • The 2010 Andrew Jackson Lady Volunteers’ 14-14 softball season won’t go down as among the greatest at the Lancaster County Class AA high school.

    The break-even mark reflects a spring of about as many ups as downs.

    A Conference IV-AA runner-up finish and a Class AA Upper State playoff berth stand as a couple of notable 2010 team accomplishments in the tradition of AJ softball.

    No doubt, the major achievement came during the Lady Vols’ recent postseason run.

  • Have you reached that point yet where you’ve said, “Enough, it’s time to do something abut the violence in Lancaster County.”

    We believe many residents here feel that way. There have been four murders in the county since the start of the year.

    The shooting death of a 3-year-old girl earlier this month has many, many people here mad.

    Jaylen Elaine Jackson was apparently caught in the crossfire of a gunfight when she was hit in the head by a bullet and killed.

  • The great thing about being in the newspaper business is that we often learn of good news before most others do.

    Last week, we were wowed by the news that Continental Tire was making a sizable donation to two local government entities.

    The company, which moved its North American corporate headquarters from Charlotte to Indian Land last year, announced it was giving $65,000 worth of tires to Lancaster County and $35,000 to the Lancaster County School District.

  • Calvin Miller doubted his faith just a little. Volunteers and organizers of the April 24 Family Promise yard sale were told if they raised $10,000, an anonymous donor would donate $10,000.

    The volunteers worked hard to organize the yard sale. Representatives from 15 churches met once a week for six weeks to plan the fundraiser.

    Miller, who is chairman of Family Promise, a network of local churches that provides homeless families with children food, shelter, clothing and counseling, was worried they couldn’t raise that much and thereby would lose that $10,000.

  • Booze it and lose it is a popular slogan in the campaign to reduce drunken driving in the Palmetto State. Three local law enforcement officers are doing their best in the ongoing fight to keep alcohol-impaired drivers off our state roads.

    The S.C. Department of Public Safety recently recognized two Lancaster Police Department officers, Pfc. Josh Small and Sgt. Dale Johnson, along with Sgt. Billy Hillton of the Lancaster County Sheriff’s Office.

  • Talk about a twist of fate. In one edition of The Lancaster News, we printed a story about Lancaster County Emergency Medical Services winning a prestigious state award at its annual meeting in Myrtle Beach.

    In that article, Lanny Bernard, EMS director, touted the accomplishments of his 52 full-time and 25 part-time employees who work hard to provide life-saving care to Lancaster County residents.

    Just days later in another article, Bernard was defending EMS response time to calls in the northern end of Lancaster County.

  • Recent news reports tell us that America’s confidence in government is at an all-time low, and here’s a good example of why. Given a choice between ensuring the safety of citizens and lining the pockets of the home building industry with profits, South Carolina may be on the verge of giving public safety the back seat.

  • Cora Jane Caston Wallace always wanted to be a writer. But that was not an option for her. In fact, she had to quit school because her parents needed her at home. The day her mother said she wasn’t going back to school, Wallace cried all night.

    Wallace later went to work for Springs Industries. She married Monroe Wallace and they had four children. Their youngest child, Suzanne, was diagnosed at an early age with a rare condition called congenital pseudoarthrosis.

  • Several years ago Andrew Smith wrote a letter, “Lynches River holds us hostage.” He described it just right. We who are on Lynches River are not able to chose our electric provider.

    We have no voice on anything. The rates are outrageous and need to be adjusted. We need an option of another electricity provider so can live like normal people.

    Shirley McGriff

    Lancaster