.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Features

  • Don’t be afraid to substitute herbs and spices

    From time to time, every cook gets into a pinch when there is no pinch of cumin in the cupboard.

    Before going out to buy more, see if there are other alternatives that will work just as well. 

    It not only saves money, but eliminates waste by using another herb or spice in a way that serves the same purpose. It could also keep you from buying a herb or spice you will only use once. 

  • I reckon time does heal old Sears & Roebuck wounds. Me and my secondhand bicycle became almost inseparable. 

    It sure made running to the store for Mama a whole lot faster. 

    Through the years that old bike had several paint jobs. Shucks, right after the war, it sported shiny chrome fenders and chain guard.

    Maybe I was getting carried away by those Saturday morning cowboy movies.

    Mama was no longer makin’ Bill Whitesell go to the picture show with me. 

    I was getting older. 

  • Name: Monique Stover

    Age: 41

    Family: One son, Deontae Stover, 10

    Job: Associate auto adjuster for Met Life Auto & Home

    Church: In His Presence Ministry (Pastor Daren Mackey)

    Hobbies: Singing, gospel radio announcer (WAGL-AM), traveling, shopping, church and cooking

  • If you want to celebrate the tremendous lifetime accomplishments of highly acclaimed performance artists, one of the best programs to watch is the annual Kennedy Center Honors, which was televised Dec. 22. 

    The Kennedy Center Honors have been awarded annually since 1978 by the Board of Trustees of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. 

  • Terrell Springs started off 2012 by making a mad dash to Lancaster from Great Falls in the wee hours of the morning.

    No, the trip wasn’t in the New Year’s Day  plans of he and his girlfriend, Ashley Boulware. However, their daughter, Telia Alani Springs, couldn’t wait.

    “I had the emergency flashers on all the way,” he said. 

  • On occasion, I’m a little jealous of W.B. Evans. This is one of those times.

    When it comes to looking back, “Mr. Bill,” as we call him in the newsroom  doesn’t have to pick and choose when looking for what stands out. Choosing the top features stories of the year is hard.

    I went through 157 issues making a few notes and was stunned to recall the people, places, events and organizations that make a difference. 

    To cull the list to 10 was almost impossible.    

  • Christmas 2011 has passed, but in reflecting on the past year, it’s an appropriate time to recall Mama’s words from 1941. She made it a point to remind her only son that I should always be grateful, regardless of circumstances.

    “Be thankful of any and all gifts under the tree,” she said.

    That’s as true now as it was then, especially after I showed my selfish streak on that Christmas Day 70 years ago. 

  • Christmastime is always special at 618 Morris Road.  

    It’s the time of year when Harris and Marcene Plyler bring their Victorian-style home to life with boughs of holly and berries. 

    These natural decorations enhance both the Plyler home and yard. 

    Beth Craig of the Leaf and Petal Garden Club passes by the Plyler home often and especially enjoys seeing it during the Christmas holidays.

  •  

    With the holiday season now fading, those colorful poinsettias will be doing the same thing in the upcoming months.

    The most popular Christmas plant in America, millions of poinsettias are given and received as gifts each year.

    But is it possible to keep it alive and going until Christmas 2012?

    According to the Clemson University Cooperative Extension Service, poinsettias can be maintained if you’re up for a challenge.

  • A simple food suited for paper plates and disposable utensils has once again become the rage in trendy, high-end restaurants.

    Sliders – small, three-bite burgers – have two personalties, said David Gerard Hogan, a professor of American history at Heidelberg College in  Ohio.  

    According to Hogan, author of “Selling ’em by the Sack: White Castle and the Creation of American Food,” sliders have become a “bifurcated” food, enjoyed by both the upscale and working class.    

  • Editor’s note: Cole Waddell is a Lancaster resident who was living in New York City during the 9/11 terrorist attacks in 2001. He moved back here in 2005. This is the third part of a three-part series about Southerners who shared Christmas dinner there each year.

     

    Six months after Dec. 25, 2001, finds me cleaning out my Aunt Ellen’s  accumulation of cards and notes.  

    One card is from Mrs. Boyce, a lady she knew.  

  • Each year, more than 42.8 million guests step through the gates at Walt Disney World near Orlando, Fla.

    That works out to an average of 117,260 visitors per day.

    Given that, what are the odds of being pulled from the throngs and selected as grand marshals to lead a parade down Main Street USA at the Magic Kingdom?

    Carolyn McDow isn’t quite sure, but she said dreams can come true.

  • The late Rev. Mickey Carnes really knew how to spin a yarn.

    Every time I crossed paths with Preacher Mickey, as I fondly called him, I left laughing. To be honest, I’m grinning right now. 

    Preacher Mickey died Saturday. I miss him already, but I can’t quit smiling. 

  •  

    The holiday season is hectic enough without fretting over what to buy for whom and how much to spend on gifts for coworkers, friends, neighbors and teachers. 

    Homemade cookies can make a lasting impression.

    According to a recent survey, 40 percent of consumers plan to spend less this year on holiday gifts. Holiday baking is a great way to tighten your budget without shrinking your gift list.

    Here are a few tricks and techniques to ensure sweet success this baking season.

  • Editor’s note: Author Cole Waddell is a Lancaster resident who was living in New York City during the 9/11 terrorist attacks in 2001. He moved back here in 2005. This is the second part of a three-part series about Southerners who shared Christmas dinner there each year.

    Part 2

    We are well aware that things have changed. With airline security now ramped up, this year’s Christmas dinner will be different.  

    There will be no jars of Duke’s Mayonnaise or pickled okra.  

  • Although Daddy would’ve argued this point some 60 years ago (at times), I’ve always prided myself in having my head on pretty straight.

    I don’t get all crossed up about situations. 

    Most of my miscues and snafus can be attributed to situations out of my control. This includes accidents to family members and stuff like people stealing my newspaper out of the box.

  • Name: Brandon Kelly

    Age: 30

    Address: Heath Springs

    Pets: Atlas 

    Job: Staff of Gregory Health and Wellness Center, University of South Carolina Lancaster

    Church: I don’t have a home church, but go where the spirit leads me on Sundays.

    Hobbies: Working on cars, Clemson football and architecture 

  • For some, the notion of buying Christmas gifts for pets is unthinkable – a yard dog is a yard dog, they say, worthy of an occasional sow’s ear (maybe). Cats find their own amusement, so why waste money?

    But with 78.2 million pet dogs in the United States, according to a national pet survey, owned by 45 million American households and 86.4 million cats in 38 million homes, it’s no surprise many think otherwise.

  • When family comes home for holidays, the big meal of the day always gets the brunt of the attention.

    However, by working ahead, you can wake sleepy heads with an aroma from the kitchen and a memorable Christmas breakfast they will remember this time next year.

    Here are a few tips to consider before your house fills up with guests:

  • Editor’s note: Author Cole Waddell is a Lancaster resident who was living in New York City during the 9/11 terrorist attacks in 2001. He moved back here in 2005. This is the first part of a three-part series about Southerners who shared Christmas dinner there each year.

     

    Of the nation’s regions,

    the South is the most possessive of her issue.

    Whatever their age, wherever they reside, they remain hers.