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Features

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    With the holiday season now fading, those colorful poinsettias will be doing the same thing in the upcoming months.

    The most popular Christmas plant in America, millions of poinsettias are given and received as gifts each year.

    But is it possible to keep it alive and going until Christmas 2012?

    According to the Clemson University Cooperative Extension Service, poinsettias can be maintained if you’re up for a challenge.

  • A simple food suited for paper plates and disposable utensils has once again become the rage in trendy, high-end restaurants.

    Sliders – small, three-bite burgers – have two personalties, said David Gerard Hogan, a professor of American history at Heidelberg College in  Ohio.  

    According to Hogan, author of “Selling ’em by the Sack: White Castle and the Creation of American Food,” sliders have become a “bifurcated” food, enjoyed by both the upscale and working class.    

  • Editor’s note: Cole Waddell is a Lancaster resident who was living in New York City during the 9/11 terrorist attacks in 2001. He moved back here in 2005. This is the third part of a three-part series about Southerners who shared Christmas dinner there each year.

     

    Six months after Dec. 25, 2001, finds me cleaning out my Aunt Ellen’s  accumulation of cards and notes.  

    One card is from Mrs. Boyce, a lady she knew.  

  • Each year, more than 42.8 million guests step through the gates at Walt Disney World near Orlando, Fla.

    That works out to an average of 117,260 visitors per day.

    Given that, what are the odds of being pulled from the throngs and selected as grand marshals to lead a parade down Main Street USA at the Magic Kingdom?

    Carolyn McDow isn’t quite sure, but she said dreams can come true.

  • The late Rev. Mickey Carnes really knew how to spin a yarn.

    Every time I crossed paths with Preacher Mickey, as I fondly called him, I left laughing. To be honest, I’m grinning right now. 

    Preacher Mickey died Saturday. I miss him already, but I can’t quit smiling. 

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    The holiday season is hectic enough without fretting over what to buy for whom and how much to spend on gifts for coworkers, friends, neighbors and teachers. 

    Homemade cookies can make a lasting impression.

    According to a recent survey, 40 percent of consumers plan to spend less this year on holiday gifts. Holiday baking is a great way to tighten your budget without shrinking your gift list.

    Here are a few tricks and techniques to ensure sweet success this baking season.

  • Editor’s note: Author Cole Waddell is a Lancaster resident who was living in New York City during the 9/11 terrorist attacks in 2001. He moved back here in 2005. This is the second part of a three-part series about Southerners who shared Christmas dinner there each year.

    Part 2

    We are well aware that things have changed. With airline security now ramped up, this year’s Christmas dinner will be different.  

    There will be no jars of Duke’s Mayonnaise or pickled okra.  

  • Although Daddy would’ve argued this point some 60 years ago (at times), I’ve always prided myself in having my head on pretty straight.

    I don’t get all crossed up about situations. 

    Most of my miscues and snafus can be attributed to situations out of my control. This includes accidents to family members and stuff like people stealing my newspaper out of the box.

  • Name: Brandon Kelly

    Age: 30

    Address: Heath Springs

    Pets: Atlas 

    Job: Staff of Gregory Health and Wellness Center, University of South Carolina Lancaster

    Church: I don’t have a home church, but go where the spirit leads me on Sundays.

    Hobbies: Working on cars, Clemson football and architecture 

  • For some, the notion of buying Christmas gifts for pets is unthinkable – a yard dog is a yard dog, they say, worthy of an occasional sow’s ear (maybe). Cats find their own amusement, so why waste money?

    But with 78.2 million pet dogs in the United States, according to a national pet survey, owned by 45 million American households and 86.4 million cats in 38 million homes, it’s no surprise many think otherwise.

  • When family comes home for holidays, the big meal of the day always gets the brunt of the attention.

    However, by working ahead, you can wake sleepy heads with an aroma from the kitchen and a memorable Christmas breakfast they will remember this time next year.

    Here are a few tips to consider before your house fills up with guests:

  • Editor’s note: Author Cole Waddell is a Lancaster resident who was living in New York City during the 9/11 terrorist attacks in 2001. He moved back here in 2005. This is the first part of a three-part series about Southerners who shared Christmas dinner there each year.

     

    Of the nation’s regions,

    the South is the most possessive of her issue.

    Whatever their age, wherever they reside, they remain hers.

  • Inspiration can come from the strangest of places. Take these two boxes, uh...box and a half of chocolate-covered cherries I’m staring at. 

    For me, this early gift, from my daughter, Kathryn, is a sure sign that Christmas is on its way.

    Before I could get one of the boxes open, my great-granddaughter, Madison, 3, came tearing through the house screaming at the top of her lungs.

    “Nana (Kathryn) fell off the ladder,” she said.

  • If you travel Charlotte Highway often, you’ve probably noticed the cute home with a parking area surrounded by a low brick wall just north of the city limits.

    If you haven’t noticed the house, Woody and Linda Wilson’s landscaping most likely caught your eye. 

    Tidy sculpted beds filled with a variety of low maintenance shrubs and other perennials topped with freshly tossed pine straw surround the house. Fresh seasonal container gardens and quaint front porch rocking chairs paint an almost flawless image.

  • You just walked by the bulletin board in the break room and saw a big question mark on the list by your name.

    You’ve been so busy that tomorrow’s Christmas party at work was forgotten. It’s a week earlier this year since there is one less weekend between Thanksgiving and Christmas.

    Now you’re in a cooking quagmire. 

  • I’m feelin’ pretty good these days, with the gutter-cleaning mishap behind me. But that’s not why I’m feeling rather spry. 

    I’ve had numerous folks contact me this week, telling me how enjoyable “Remember When” has become for them. In my case, numerous means more than three.

    I share a special bond with any reader who gets a chuckle over some of my childhood escapades or better yet, can close his eyes and snicker about  doing the same sort of thing.

  • Name: Debbie Gill

    Age: 46

    Address: Foxmeade Court

    Family: Husband, Troy; children, Shakari and Jermaine

    Pets: Betty (a fish)

    Job: U.S. Postal Service

    Church: New Independent Church

    Hobbies: Softball

    Favorite movie/book: “Sammy the Goat”

    Favorite food: Steak

  • Family. We all belong to (at least) one.                       Our families can include the people we cherish and love the most.  

    According to broad definition, “family” means a group of people who are tied together through some common thread – whether it be biological, ancestry, living arrangements, common interest or love. Family, in my dictionary, has 11 distinct definitions.   

  •  Potatoes can be a mystery. With many stores now carrying multiple varieties, trying to figure out what potato works best for what can be a guessing game.

    Potatoes usually fall into two categories (baking and boiling). The chief difference between the two types is the starch content. 

    Baking potatoes are relatively high in starch. Boiling potatoes are lower in starch and waxy, which holds them together when boiling or in soup and stews.

  • In the late 1860s, chili was frontier food. 

    The mixture of dried beef, suet, chili peppers and salt was pounded together into compact bricks and left to dry in the hot sun was a regional dish enjoyed by those in Texas and neighboring Louisiana.

    Easily transported, these bricks could be dropped into a pot of boiling water on the trail to make a stew-like soup for settlers and cowboys trekking across the Midwest.