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Features

  • As a part of Lancaster County for more than 60 years, the Lancaster Soil and Water Conservation District wants to remind the community that everyone has a connection to natural resources. The National Association of Conservation Districts (NACD) celebrated the 58th year of Stewardship Week April 28-May 5. The 2013 Stewardship Week was themed “Where Does Your Water Shed?”  

  • Nancy Parsons
    Landmark News Service
    GREAT FALLS – Two years ago, a piece of history was uncovered in Great Falls.
    “Stoney Lonesome,” the old town jail, was unearthed. But now the brick building sits abandoned with weeds and bushes growing up around it.
    Great Falls Mayor Don Camp says he has not abandoned the historical project. He said the weather has prevented plans to spruce up the area and make the piece of history a place people would want to visit.

  • From simple wooden boxes to complex systems made for an entire flock of birds, birdhouses come in all shapes and sizes.
    However, one Lancaster resident has turned them into works of art.

    John R. “Cornbread” Collins Jr., 75, started building regular birdhouses back in 2004, after retiring as a truck driver in 2001.
    Collins said he sold about 1,200 of the birdhouses in one year, mainly on eBay, but also out of the back of his truck.

    David Poston, who lives in Rock Hill, saw the birdhouses and ordered 150 of them, Collins said.

  • For Jimmy Fox, school bus driving was a mission field.

    A retired Baptist minister, Fox has stepped down as a bus driver for Indian Land schools, where for a decade he greeted each child by name, sent them birthday and Christmas cards and encouraged them to do their best.

    “I love relating to the students more than driving the bus,” said Fox, 73, a Van Wyck native. “If kids were having trouble with a lesson, I would help them with it. I tried to teach them politeness, manners and how to treat others.”

  • Every year since 1963, May has been the month to appreciate and celebrate the vitality and aspirations of older adults and their contributions and achievements.

    It is a proud tradition that shows our nation’s commitment to honor the value that elders continue to contribute to our communities.
    This year, the theme of Older Americans Month is “Unleash the Power of Age!,” which emphasizes the important role of older adults. This May, communities across the nation will recognize older Americans as productive, active and influential members of society.

  • The belief that regular exercise can help prolong life and contribute to overall wellness is widely accepted among all age groups.

    Lancaster resident Joyce Deese has been putting that theory to the test as an exercise instructor for the past 25 years. Now at the age of 67, Deese is still going strong.

    “Exercise is a commitment to your body, a way of life,” Deese said. “It’s something you have to be serious about or you won’t see any results.

    What you eat matters; it’s not just about dieting.

  • While we are all taught to use good manners when answering the telephone, not everyone who calls you necessarily has good intentions.

    According to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, a recent spate of lottery scams or advance fee frauds originating in Jamaica are targeting seniors and other Americans by telephone.

    While the Jamaican and U.S. governments have teamed to tighten laws and combat the problem, it’s important to guard against becoming the next victim.

  • Every year, the Palmetto Poison Center receives thousands of calls from South Carolinians regarding their medications. Many of these callers are elderly persons who have questions about their prescriptions or recommended dosages. This specific sector of our population is oftentimes prone to uncertainty, which can stem from a number of sources, including loss of memory or confusion resulting from a large volume of prescribed medications.

  • South Carolina residents are encouraged to cast their vote for the state’s Outstanding Senior Volunteer.

    The recognition is part of the Salute to Senior Service program, sponsored by Home Instead Inc., the franchisor of the Home Instead Senior Care network. The program honors the contributions of adults 65 and older who give at least 15 hours a month of volunteer service to their favorite causes.

  • Individuals with arthritis are often stuck between a rock and a hard place.

    Doctors want people to exercise to keep up the range of motion in affected joints. However, even some limited movements can cause pain and suffering to those with arthritis. Furthermore, individuals with arthritis may shy away from the activities they once enjoyed because the pain is simply too overwhelming.

  • For Americans 65 and older, falling down can be the worst thing to happen to them, according to statistics:

  • Senior Circle is a non-profit resource program offered by Springs Memorial Hospital. The mission of Senior Circle is to encourage a healthy and active lifestyle for seniors by providing programs that encourage continued learning, wellness, health, volunteer opportunities and social activities at our hospital and throughout the community.  We also provide a forum for fellowship and member-only discounts and privileges.  

  • A poll of ASE-certified automotive technicians indicated that drivers over 60 are among the most conscientious when it comes to taking their vehicles in for routine maintenance and repair.

    The experts at the nonprofit National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) remind consumers that good communication between shop and customer can help make the repair process go smoothly.

  • The family of John Hill will have a fundraiser event beginning at 7 a.m. Saturday, April 20, at the Tradesville Community Center. Proceeds benefit Hill, who is suffering injuries after falling from a tree stand in December 2012.
    The event includes a yard sale, a 50/50 drawing, a silent auction and cornhole tournament. Barbecue chicken plates are available for $8. For more information, call (803) 320-1194.

  • I was at a local gym the other day and noticed a sign on the wall. The sign read, “One hour of exercise is four percent of your day.”  

    That made me think; if we’re doing the exercise wrong, what percentage will we end up with? To gauge that from an efficient and exercise productivity stand point, I would say zero percent.

  • The 6th Annual Great Falls Rescue Squad Pro Rodeo, sanctioned by the International Professional Rodeo Association, will kick off with a performance by The Tams.

    The Tams will perform from 6 to 10 p.m. on June 7 at the Old Republic Ballfield behind the Great Falls Presbyterian Church at 500 Dearborn St., Great Falls.

    Gates open at 4 p.m.

    “Dancing will be allowed/expected,” Great Falls Rescue Squad Captain Terry Sims said. “And concessions will be available.”

  • Age: 70
    Address: Clearwater Drive
    Family: Son, Mitchell Allen; daughter, Porsha Mungo; daughter-in-law, Brenda Allen; grandchildren, Danielle, Justin and Kotera Allen and Anaiya and Darius Brice
    Pets: Fish
    Job: Retired
    Church: Mt. Carmel AME Zion
    Hobbies: Sewing, gardening and cooking
    Favorite books: The Bible
    Favorite movie: Tyler Perry movies

  • From release
    Beginning March 23, the University of South Carolina Lancaster’s Native American Studies department will host its eighth annual Native American Studies Week.

    Since 2005, USCL has hosted a week of events each spring focused on the rich history and cultural traditions of South Carolina’s indigenous peoples.

    This year’s program focuses on issues surrounding Native Americans and law and justice, and includes lectures by regional and nationally-recognized scholars, screenings of films and exhibits highlighting the topic.

  • The friendship between a rat, mole, badger and toad is tested in the musical “The Wind in the Willows,” a production of The Community Playhouse of Lancaster County that opens Friday, March 1, at the Barr Street auditorium.

    The production, which runs until March 9, has catchy songs, plenty of comedy and audience participation that children and adults will enjoy, theater officials said.

  • Opera has come to Indian Land.

    Opera Experience Southeast presented Puccini’s “La Boheme” to a full house Jan. 7 and 8 in the Lake House at Sun City Carolina Lakes.

    Excitement and drama filled the theater from the opening scene to the final curtain. “La Boheme” tells the timeless story of a shy young woman who meets and falls in love with a passionate poet on a cold evening in Paris. Love, jealousy, forgiveness – all the necessary ingredients were neatly wrapped in music, with subtitles conveniently displayed.