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Features

  • Volunteers with the local American Red Cross chapter will be out in force from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday soliciting donations from shoppers at Wal-Mart during Red Cross Day of Caring.

    Local director Gina Amato said March is Red Cross Month and the day was set up to let the community know what its local chapter does. An Emergency Response Vehicle will be on display and an information booth will be set up.

  • Diabetes has become the greatest American public health crisis of the next 25 years.

    To address the burden of this disease, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) is issuing an urgent call-to-action for Americans to find out their risk for type 2 diabetes during the 21st annual American Diabetes Alert Day.

    Nearly 6 million Americans have diabetes, but don’t know it.

    Another 57 million Americans have pre-diabetes, placing them at increased risk.

    There are two types of diabetes – type 1 and type 2.

  • Indian Land’s new Council on Aging site manager brings heart to her job preparing activities and meals for area senior citizens. 

    Elvira Faulkner-McIlwain started her new role in December.

    She is the second manager for the program since the sudden illness and death of former director Lynda Adams last June.

    Faulkner-McIlwain retired from Joslyn Clark Controls after 32 years to care for her ailing mother. When she was ready to return to the workforce, she started looking for a part-time job.

  • This year in the classroom, the county’s 900-plus fourth-graders become acquainted with astronomers such as Galileo Galilei and Edmund Halley for the first time.

    Outside the classroom – at the pool inside the Gregory Health and Wellness Center at the University of South Carolina at Lancaster, they become  acquainted with “Miss Anne.”

    Miss Anne is Anne Small, a certified Red Cross swim instructor and aquatics director at USCL.

    Years from now, these students might not recall

  • Bluegrass music is gaining popularity around Lancaster and the Master’s Men fellowship group of High Point Free Will Baptist Church are using it to help folks in the community.

    The church, at 2095 Great Falls Highway, is holding a gospel bluegrass fundraiser from 1 to 6 p.m. Saturday to help defray the costs of local service projects it undertakes.

    Amission is a $6 donation and the concert will feature CrossHeirs, Thompson Creek, New Fire, Toby Creek and Easy Pickin.’ Refreshments and food will be sold.

  • I was greeted with much enthusiasm by Kristin Scott Benson when we talked by phone Wednesday. We hadn’t talked in 15 years.

    Her name may not ring a bell for most of you, but for those of you headed to The Grascals concert at the University of South Carolina at Lancaster at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, you’ll soon be acquainted with the bluegrass band’s talented banjo player. The concert is part of USCL Educational Foundation’s 2009 Performing Arts Series.

  • YORK – Mystery surrounds the origins of an unlikely object – an antique sewing basket.

    But its roots may lie in eastern Lancaster County.

    The basket was purchased in 1998 by the Culture and Heritage Museums in York County. There, its authenticity and approximate date of origin was verified as around 1850, consistent with the style and weaving techniques of African slaves at that time.

  • Great musicians always find a way to make good music, but for great musicians to make great music, they must find a bond that goes beyond the purely musical to the personal.

    For The Grascals, that bond has been forged by friendships, shared resumes and a keen mingling of bluegrass and country music that has been a Nashville hallmark for more than 40 years.

    Now they are coming here. The Grascals will perform 7:30 p.m. Saturday on the Bundy Auditorium stage in the Bradley Arts and Sciences Building at the University of South Carolina at Lancaster.

  • LAKE WATEREE – If the symbols for a 25th wedding anniversary are silver, green garnet and irises, those used in a 24th wedding anniversary have to be peace signs, beads, tie- dyed clothes, green toenail polish with purple polka dots and flower arrangements inevery color of the rainbow.

    Evidently after celebrating 24 years together, you renew your vows surrounded by family and friends sitting on blankets in the midst of ladybugs meandering through patches of clover.

    That’s just what Charlene and Jamye Easler did Saturday at their “hippie wedding.”

  • Editor’s note: Each Sunday this month, in celebration of March as American Red Cross Month, The Lancaster News is honoring local volunteers who are the cornerstone of what the agency does. From donating blood and helping military families to disaster relief and teaching CPR and first aid, 96 percent of the Red Cross work force is volunteers. Many of those who make a difference everyday are your neighbors. 

    In 1989, Lancaster High School senior Pam Neely Giardiello started donating blood to the Red Cross at the urging of her mother, Kathy Sistare.

  • If a couple of the characters in Dr. John Griffin’s latest book, “Murder in the Low Country” seem familiar, that’s OK.

    Griffin, distinguished professor emeritus at the University of South Carolina at Lancaster, said they’re supposed to.

    Griffin will be signing copies of the book at the Lancaster County Council of the Arts gallery, 201 W. Gay St., from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Thursday.

    Griffin sees Bronson sheriff and narrator Catlette “Cat” Wolfe every time he looks in a mirror.

  • It’s time to “Spring forward.”

    Sunday at 2 a.m. signals the start of daylight-saving time, when Americans set their clocks ahead by an hour to create another hour of sunlight each evening.

    Here are a few interesting facts about the time change you may not be aware of:

    – It’s officially called daylight-saving time, not daylight-savings time.

  • About 300 people showed up for last year’s inaugural 4-H Fun Day.

    Given this weekend’s weather forecast, Ashley Hinson is looking for a heavy turnout for the second annual event, which raises community awareness of the 4-H programs for youth in Lancaster.

    4-H Fun Day is 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday at Ace Hardware and Garden Center, 714 S. Market St. Forecasters are calling for clear skies, plenty of sunshine and temperatures in the low 70s, which is a contrast to weather on the last two weekends.

  • OK, I’ll admit it. I’m a fan of Girl Scout cookies. Not that I eat them (that much); gastric bypass took care of any affinity for sweets that I have several years ago.

    But I am a fan. Imagine the surprise when I recently walked in and found two boxes on my desk, wrapped together with a bow, along with a note from Cherie Ellis, community development manager for the Mountains to Midlands division of the Girl Scouts of South Carolina.

    The Peanut Butter Patties were placed on the newsroom alter, where they almost immediately disappeared.

  • Inclement weather on Sunday forced postponement of the fourth annual Friends Concert at the Lancaster County Council of the Arts gallery.

    Organizer Erin Moon-Kelly said the concert has been rescheduled for 3 p.m. on March 8 at the arts gallery, 201 W. Gay St.

  • After 100 years, Mildred Caskey McWaters continues to grow in the kind of grace refined by fire.

    No, it’s not the kind of fire that emanated from the birthday cake she enjoyed during the celebration of her 100th birthday on Feb. 16 at White Oak Manor.

    McWaters’ grace comes from family flames that spark when one your four children accidentally sets the car shed ablaze and fire trucks show up, sirens blaring, in front of your home on West Gay Street.

  • In 1980, a relatively unknown bluegrass picker left Kentucky for Tennessee, where he promptly turned country music upside down with two No. 1 hits.

    That artist – Ricky Skaggs – and those songs, “Cryin’ My Heart Out Over You,” and “I Don’t Care,” are credited with giving birth the neotraditonal country music movement.

    Three years later, Skaggs was named “Entertainer of the Year” by the Country Music Association.

  • These days, you want the most for your money. Now that you’ve clipped all the coupons and recipes, finished the crossword puzzle and gleaned every valuable nugget of information from the previous edition of The Lancaster News, what do you do with what’s left? Here are a few green suggestions on how to reuse and recycle your newspaper.

    1. Compost

  • Attention all musicians and music lovers in the Lancaster area.

    On Sunday afternoon, the Lancaster Council of the Arts gallery will once again be filled with beautiful musical strains ranging from Villia-Lobos to Johann Sebastian Bach during the 4th annual Friends Concert Series.

    The event is cosponsored and produced by Erin Moon-Kelly, EMK Music and the Lancaster County Council for the Arts.

  • When I walked into the Buford Little General Store one day earlier this month, co-owner Missy West handed me a cupcake.

    “Try it,” she said. Never one to argue, I did.

    “This is pretty good,” I said. “Did you make these?”

    Missy wasted little time with a reply.

    “Yep,” she said. “Now it’s your turn,” before handing me a Ziploc bag of something resembling pancake batter and a cake recipe for Amish Friendship Bread.

    “First Day, Feb. 7,” was written on the bag.