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Features

  • The members of Ambrosia have been together for 39 years now.

    The pop music act that climbed to the top of the charts in the 1970s and 1980s with Top-10 hits like “Biggest Part” and “How Much I Feel,” along with John Ford Coley, will close out the 2008-09 Performing Arts Series at the University of South Carolina at Lancaster on Saturday night.

    Show time is 7:30 p.m. and tickets are $50.

  • For an April Fools Day prank your family won’t soon forget – get ’em when they least expect it – at the dinner table with this one-of-a-kind Baked Apples with SPAM Streusel recipe.

  • Editor’s note: Each Sunday this month, in celebration of March as American Red Cross Month, The Lancaster News has honored local volunteers who are the cornerstone of what the agency does. From donating blood and helping military families to disaster relief and teaching CPR and first aid, 96 percent of the Red Cross work force is volunteers. Many of those who make a difference every day are your neighbors. 

    Like many, Laura Hinson was incensed to learn that someone had the gall to steal a mobile trailer from the Red Cross.

  • People around here have lots of reasons why they enjoy spending time keeping their yards looking beautiful. But Janie Faile probably has one of the most unique. 

    Faile says that at her age if she doesn’t keep moving around and trying, she wouldn’t be able to do anything else. 

    This “moving around and trying” has not only kept her active, it has earned her home, at 249 Holiday Road in Lancaster,  the designation as Yard of the Month for March.

  • The lights of Lancaster Speedway were burning brightly on Saturday as local racers and racing fans alike welcomed the 2009 season at the half-mile dirt track. Here’s a look at some of the infield and pits road action.

  • Grocery store aisles can be recipes for disasters.

    Stacked with endless choices and bright labels, they can lead to all sorts of confusion for shoppers. When you throw in a medical condition, such as diabetes, the confusions quickly becomes frustration.

    It’s a never ending battle in trying to figure out what to eat, said Sherry Steele of Lancaster, who was diagnosed with diabetes about four weeks ago.

  • Lucy Morris will celebrate her 75th birthday Saturday. You’d think that after 57 years of marriage to her husband, Ben, 45 years with Springs Industries, two sons and eight grandchildren, she’d be ready to slow down.

    But not Morris; she’s just getting started.

    “There’s still a lot of life in us old folks,” she said laughing. “Volunteering is a good way to stay busy."

    Morris has been a critical cog of the local Red Cross volunteer network since 2004.

  • Volunteers with the local American Red Cross chapter will be out in force from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday soliciting donations from shoppers at Wal-Mart during Red Cross Day of Caring.

    Local director Gina Amato said March is Red Cross Month and the day was set up to let the community know what its local chapter does. An Emergency Response Vehicle will be on display and an information booth will be set up.

  • Diabetes has become the greatest American public health crisis of the next 25 years.

    To address the burden of this disease, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) is issuing an urgent call-to-action for Americans to find out their risk for type 2 diabetes during the 21st annual American Diabetes Alert Day.

    Nearly 6 million Americans have diabetes, but don’t know it.

    Another 57 million Americans have pre-diabetes, placing them at increased risk.

    There are two types of diabetes – type 1 and type 2.

  • Indian Land’s new Council on Aging site manager brings heart to her job preparing activities and meals for area senior citizens. 

    Elvira Faulkner-McIlwain started her new role in December.

    She is the second manager for the program since the sudden illness and death of former director Lynda Adams last June.

    Faulkner-McIlwain retired from Joslyn Clark Controls after 32 years to care for her ailing mother. When she was ready to return to the workforce, she started looking for a part-time job.

  • This year in the classroom, the county’s 900-plus fourth-graders become acquainted with astronomers such as Galileo Galilei and Edmund Halley for the first time.

    Outside the classroom – at the pool inside the Gregory Health and Wellness Center at the University of South Carolina at Lancaster, they become  acquainted with “Miss Anne.”

    Miss Anne is Anne Small, a certified Red Cross swim instructor and aquatics director at USCL.

    Years from now, these students might not recall

  • Bluegrass music is gaining popularity around Lancaster and the Master’s Men fellowship group of High Point Free Will Baptist Church are using it to help folks in the community.

    The church, at 2095 Great Falls Highway, is holding a gospel bluegrass fundraiser from 1 to 6 p.m. Saturday to help defray the costs of local service projects it undertakes.

    Amission is a $6 donation and the concert will feature CrossHeirs, Thompson Creek, New Fire, Toby Creek and Easy Pickin.’ Refreshments and food will be sold.

  • I was greeted with much enthusiasm by Kristin Scott Benson when we talked by phone Wednesday. We hadn’t talked in 15 years.

    Her name may not ring a bell for most of you, but for those of you headed to The Grascals concert at the University of South Carolina at Lancaster at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, you’ll soon be acquainted with the bluegrass band’s talented banjo player. The concert is part of USCL Educational Foundation’s 2009 Performing Arts Series.

  • YORK – Mystery surrounds the origins of an unlikely object – an antique sewing basket.

    But its roots may lie in eastern Lancaster County.

    The basket was purchased in 1998 by the Culture and Heritage Museums in York County. There, its authenticity and approximate date of origin was verified as around 1850, consistent with the style and weaving techniques of African slaves at that time.

  • Great musicians always find a way to make good music, but for great musicians to make great music, they must find a bond that goes beyond the purely musical to the personal.

    For The Grascals, that bond has been forged by friendships, shared resumes and a keen mingling of bluegrass and country music that has been a Nashville hallmark for more than 40 years.

    Now they are coming here. The Grascals will perform 7:30 p.m. Saturday on the Bundy Auditorium stage in the Bradley Arts and Sciences Building at the University of South Carolina at Lancaster.

  • LAKE WATEREE – If the symbols for a 25th wedding anniversary are silver, green garnet and irises, those used in a 24th wedding anniversary have to be peace signs, beads, tie- dyed clothes, green toenail polish with purple polka dots and flower arrangements inevery color of the rainbow.

    Evidently after celebrating 24 years together, you renew your vows surrounded by family and friends sitting on blankets in the midst of ladybugs meandering through patches of clover.

    That’s just what Charlene and Jamye Easler did Saturday at their “hippie wedding.”

  • Editor’s note: Each Sunday this month, in celebration of March as American Red Cross Month, The Lancaster News is honoring local volunteers who are the cornerstone of what the agency does. From donating blood and helping military families to disaster relief and teaching CPR and first aid, 96 percent of the Red Cross work force is volunteers. Many of those who make a difference everyday are your neighbors. 

    In 1989, Lancaster High School senior Pam Neely Giardiello started donating blood to the Red Cross at the urging of her mother, Kathy Sistare.

  • If a couple of the characters in Dr. John Griffin’s latest book, “Murder in the Low Country” seem familiar, that’s OK.

    Griffin, distinguished professor emeritus at the University of South Carolina at Lancaster, said they’re supposed to.

    Griffin will be signing copies of the book at the Lancaster County Council of the Arts gallery, 201 W. Gay St., from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Thursday.

    Griffin sees Bronson sheriff and narrator Catlette “Cat” Wolfe every time he looks in a mirror.

  • It’s time to “Spring forward.”

    Sunday at 2 a.m. signals the start of daylight-saving time, when Americans set their clocks ahead by an hour to create another hour of sunlight each evening.

    Here are a few interesting facts about the time change you may not be aware of:

    – It’s officially called daylight-saving time, not daylight-savings time.

  • About 300 people showed up for last year’s inaugural 4-H Fun Day.

    Given this weekend’s weather forecast, Ashley Hinson is looking for a heavy turnout for the second annual event, which raises community awareness of the 4-H programs for youth in Lancaster.

    4-H Fun Day is 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday at Ace Hardware and Garden Center, 714 S. Market St. Forecasters are calling for clear skies, plenty of sunshine and temperatures in the low 70s, which is a contrast to weather on the last two weekends.