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Features

  • Lancaster High culinary arts teacher Gregg Shipston wasn’t a bit surprised when Rachelle Campbell became the school’s first student to earn a ProStart certification.

    “Since the class started, I’ve had close to 175 students,” Shipston said. “If I would’ve had my pick as to who would be our first certified student, it would be Rachelle. She’s very self-motivated.”

    ProStart is a two-year, flexible self-pace career program for students interested in the culinary arts.

  • For Dianne Cole, every hour of every day is different.

    She may be OK one minute and burst into tears the next.

    It’s been that way for almost five months now, since her son, Edward Paul “Little Gene” Jenkins, 30, died unexpectedly.

    Hers is the kind of pain that comes from losing a child. She never dreamed her son’s life could be taken away in an instant.

  • The focus of the Southern gospel trio, Greater Vision is clear.

    They may have climbed to the top of the Christian music ladder by becoming the most celebrated trio in Gospel music history.

    With numerous Top 10 and a stack of No. 1 Southern gospel hits, several songs of the year by the Singing News Fan Awards, this internationally-known trio has established a solid presence.

    But the awards, accolades and hit songs matter very little, said Greater Vision founder Gerald Wolfe.

  • In August 2008, Palmetto Thunder cased its colors for the last time when the 178th Field Artillery Battalion was deactivated.

    Many of its members are now attached to different National Guard units across the state.

    But some of them who served their country during various military conflicts like Operation Iraqi Freedom are still around.

    So are other military veterans, including the county’s five World War II prisoners of war and four Gold Star mothers. 

  • Several county churches will host special worship services this week. They include dramas, Maundy Thursday services, the Last Supper, Good Friday, and the crucifixion of Christ and His resurrection on Easter Sunday. Here is a look so you can make plans to attend.

    Easter Sunday services

    – Camp Creek Baptist Church, 998 Potter Road, will hold a sunrise service at 7 a.m. April 12. Breakfast will follow at 7:45 a.m., Sunday school is 9 a.m. and worship services are at 10 a.m. For details, call 286-9808 or 285-0645.

  • The spirit of God moves wherever it will. Sometimes, it moves a church family into an old Coke warehouse on S.C. 9 Bypass that’s been transformed into a worship center.

    That’s what Christian Assembly Worship Center did in October 2008. Today, its congregation will celebrate Easter Sunday inside a state-of-the-art facility that’s equipped with the latest technology.

    “We’re really looking forward to it,” said it’s pastor Marvin Tennant.

  • I stood in the living room of Granny Summers’ house early one Easter Sunday afternoon with my thoughts running wild. The window shades were pulled down and the front door was shut tight. 

    After a covered-dish, resurrection day dinner that included just about any and everything that Granny, Momma and my five aunts could dream up, I was daydreaming until Aunt Judy’s voice brought me back into reality.

  • The very first Easter baskets were given the appearance of bird nests to include renewal and springtime into the holiday that commemorates Jesus’ resurrection.

    You can use that as a theme to make these kid-friendly, crowd-pleasing Chow Mein Noodle Birds Nest Cookies.

  • Sometimes I find myself sitting in front of a laptop at a kitchen table with two other adults who are also on laptops.

    It’s probably the geekiest thing ever.

    All three of us are likely catching up with friends, taking dumb quizzes or even chatting with each other online – yes, each other, even as we sit at the table together – on the social network – Facebook.

    I tried the MySpace thing, but it didn’t take. I forgot my password and could never log on again.

  • HEATH SPRINGS – Twenty years from now, Tucker and Thomas Adams are going to be old hands at farming.

    After raising 25 chickens last summer, the brothers have been raising two pigs as part of a 4-H market pig project.

    And under their watchful eyes and attention for the last four months, those two pigs – 13 and 35 – have grown from about 65 pounds each to almost 250 pounds.

    Tucker, 9, is a third-grader at Heath Springs Elementary School, and Thomas, 10, is a fourth-grader. They have been in 4-H for two years.

  • The 2009 Relay For Life for Lancaster County is scheduled for 7 p.m. April  24 at Lancaster County Memorial Stadium. The annual American Cancer Society fundraiser brings teams of local volunteers together to support those diagnosed with cancer and cancer survivors.

    But until then, the local 59 Relay For Life teams are working hard toward the $205,000 goal. The money is used to help fund cancer research and American Cancer Society programs.

  • The members of Ambrosia have been together for 39 years now.

    The pop music act that climbed to the top of the charts in the 1970s and 1980s with Top-10 hits like “Biggest Part” and “How Much I Feel,” along with John Ford Coley, will close out the 2008-09 Performing Arts Series at the University of South Carolina at Lancaster on Saturday night.

    Show time is 7:30 p.m. and tickets are $50.

  • For an April Fools Day prank your family won’t soon forget – get ’em when they least expect it – at the dinner table with this one-of-a-kind Baked Apples with SPAM Streusel recipe.

  • Editor’s note: Each Sunday this month, in celebration of March as American Red Cross Month, The Lancaster News has honored local volunteers who are the cornerstone of what the agency does. From donating blood and helping military families to disaster relief and teaching CPR and first aid, 96 percent of the Red Cross work force is volunteers. Many of those who make a difference every day are your neighbors. 

    Like many, Laura Hinson was incensed to learn that someone had the gall to steal a mobile trailer from the Red Cross.

  • People around here have lots of reasons why they enjoy spending time keeping their yards looking beautiful. But Janie Faile probably has one of the most unique. 

    Faile says that at her age if she doesn’t keep moving around and trying, she wouldn’t be able to do anything else. 

    This “moving around and trying” has not only kept her active, it has earned her home, at 249 Holiday Road in Lancaster,  the designation as Yard of the Month for March.

  • The lights of Lancaster Speedway were burning brightly on Saturday as local racers and racing fans alike welcomed the 2009 season at the half-mile dirt track. Here’s a look at some of the infield and pits road action.

  • Grocery store aisles can be recipes for disasters.

    Stacked with endless choices and bright labels, they can lead to all sorts of confusion for shoppers. When you throw in a medical condition, such as diabetes, the confusions quickly becomes frustration.

    It’s a never ending battle in trying to figure out what to eat, said Sherry Steele of Lancaster, who was diagnosed with diabetes about four weeks ago.

  • Lucy Morris will celebrate her 75th birthday Saturday. You’d think that after 57 years of marriage to her husband, Ben, 45 years with Springs Industries, two sons and eight grandchildren, she’d be ready to slow down.

    But not Morris; she’s just getting started.

    “There’s still a lot of life in us old folks,” she said laughing. “Volunteering is a good way to stay busy."

    Morris has been a critical cog of the local Red Cross volunteer network since 2004.

  • Volunteers with the local American Red Cross chapter will be out in force from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday soliciting donations from shoppers at Wal-Mart during Red Cross Day of Caring.

    Local director Gina Amato said March is Red Cross Month and the day was set up to let the community know what its local chapter does. An Emergency Response Vehicle will be on display and an information booth will be set up.

  • Diabetes has become the greatest American public health crisis of the next 25 years.

    To address the burden of this disease, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) is issuing an urgent call-to-action for Americans to find out their risk for type 2 diabetes during the 21st annual American Diabetes Alert Day.

    Nearly 6 million Americans have diabetes, but don’t know it.

    Another 57 million Americans have pre-diabetes, placing them at increased risk.

    There are two types of diabetes – type 1 and type 2.