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Features

  • It’s about 275 miles from Latrobe, Pa., and Wilmington, Ohio.

    However, the great banana split debate splits the two towns apart much further.

    Both lay claims as the home of the banana split, but there can be only one.

    Who would have ever thought that a one scoop each of vanilla, chocolate and strawberry ice cream, a whole banana, pineapple, chocolate syrup, strawberry topping, whipped cream, and nuts and cherries in a “boat” could stir up such controversy?

    Both towns have legitimate claims.

  • Buford High School graduate Randi Hollis has learned how to be a local role model, whether she wanted to or not.

    For the soft-spoken Hollis, stepping into the limelight as Miss Lancaster 2009 hasn’t been easy.

    Calling herself the most “unlikely of contestants,” Hollis left for Spartanburg on Saturday and the 2009 Miss South Carolina pageant which starts Tuesday.

    Hollis, 17, is among the 50 contestants seeking the crown.

  • Looking for some all-American Independence Day fun? You won’t have to look far. From neighborhood gatherings to professional fireworks shows, there’s plenty to do. Here are some area events:

    – Rock Hill will host Red, White and Boom at 6 p.m. today at the Old Town Amphitheater on Black Street. The Oneppo Brothers and ZoSo will perform until the fireworks begin at 10 p.m. There will be children’s activities and food. For details, e-mail crandall@cityofrockhill.com.

  • Leslie Ragsdale loves her day lilies.

    The proof is the hundreds of them in her yard at 2780 Neill Road. 

    Ragsdale devotes most of her time to tending her gardens filled with flowering lilies in just about every color imaginable.

    Others have noticed the beautiful collection, too. 

    Ragsdale’s yard was named the June Yard of the Month by the Lancaster Council of Garden Clubs. 

  • Grilling corn on the cob isn’t complicated after all. I can say that now after years of scorching and drying out my share of corn ears to something that deer won’t even eat.

    Like many, I had made it much harder than it had to be.

    Think about it; burning a perfectly good ear of corn to the point that it’s inedible isn’t very hard to do.

    Little did I know that all it took was a little water.

    Yes, water. That’s it; nothing more.

  •  For my dad, the late Tim Foster;

  •  It’s been 20 years since the Palmetto State’s storm of the century – Hurricane Hugo – slammed onto land near Charleston.

    On Sept. 21-22, 1989, the Category 4 storm – with winds in excess of 131 mph, a 20-foot storm surge and more than 10 inches of rainfall – tore a path of destruction through the state.

    When the rain and wind stopped, portions of Lancaster County were battered. 

  •  

    Incidence of insect bites increase with summer heat

    American College of Emergency Physicians

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – As temperatures rise, more and more people are venturing outdoors. The nation’s emergency physicians are warning about the dangers of insect bites – specifically from ticks and mosquitoes – which can cause serious illnesses.

  •  No matter what your lifestyle, incorporating fitness into your daily schedule is easier and more natural than yothink. Here are a few suggestions that can help make yofit fitness into your daily routine. However, ask your doctor before engaging in strenuous physical activity 

    At work

    Walk, bike or jog to work once a week.

  •  

    Past generations turned to low-cost frozen dinners when the money got tight. These days, cutting back means skipping restaurants and cooking at home instead, according to Sloan Trends, which follows changes in eating habits.

    According to a recent report in Food Technology, 53 percent of consumers are cooking from scratch more frequently.

  •  

    A new Elks Lodge has been established in this area.

    The Fort Mill Elks Lodge No. 2859 was formally chartered  March 29.

    The group, which meets at the American Legion building in Fort Mill, already has 122 members from the Fort Mill/Indian Land area.

  • Krista Cahill walked across the stage to receive her high school diploma Friday. But unlike her fellow 398 Lancaster High grads, Cahill, 18, has some unfinished business to take care of later this month.

    After taking top honors in the hairstyling division at the 2009 Skills USA Trade Competition in Greenville, Cahill will represent South Carolina in the upcoming nationals.

  • Do the math.

    Those in search of the perfect Father’s Day gift may want to consider buying Dad a season ticket for the 2009-10 Performing Arts Series at the University of South Carolina at Lancaster.

    At $395, that works out to about $44 apiece for the nine upcoming shows, which includes The Spinners, Little Big Town, the Glenn Miller Orchestra and The Tams.

  • Ready or not, the switch from analog television to the digital age is here.

    If you don’t notice anything different, that’s a good thing, analysts say.

    “When you get up Saturday morning and turn on your TV, if it doesn’t work,  you’ll know,” said Doug Crenshaw, owner of the Energy Center, who is certified to sell the special converter boxes that decode the digital signal.

    The FCC has set up  a toll-free hot line – 1-888-CALL FCC (225-5322) – for viewers with technical difficulties.

  • Father’s Day is rapidly approaching (June 21) and you don’t have any idea what to get dear old Dad for a gift this year.Not only are your ideas limited, but your Benjamins are, too. However, take heart: there’s more to choose from than boring gold-plated pens, neckties and new socks if your budget is in a bind. Why not consider one of these gifts that are priced below $25?

  • The mercury is rising, picnic baskets are coming down from the attic and it’s almost time for swimming pools to open.

    It’s also time to sit back in the porch swing and sip a glass of iced tea.

    Legend has it that English tea merchant Richard Blechynden discovered the beverage nearly 100 years ago at the 1904 World’s Fair in St. Louis.

    Those attending the gala showed little interest in drink hot tea that day so the quick-thinking Blechynden added ice, and the rest is “hist-tea-ree.”

  • There’s no argument among the experts that we should consume less trans fats and saturated fats. The problem is we don’t want to give them up.

    Trans fats and saturated fats contribute to increases in blood cholesterol and a greater risk of heart disease.

    The truth is we like the taste. Saturated fats typically come from animal-based products such as red meat, butter and other full-fat dairy products. Trans fats are commonly found in packaged bakery products.

    But not all fats are bad.

  • National Garden Week is a great opportunity to call attention to the many contributions gardeners make to the beauty and environmental health of our communities and nation.

    In celebration of National Garden Week, the Lancaster Garden Club is sponsoring a free garden tour from 3 to 5 p.m. Sunday that features five of Lancaster County’s most beautiful yards. The club is also featuring these tours in honor of fellow club member, Betsy Steele, who was just inducted as president of the Garden Club of South Carolina.

  • HEATH SPRINGS – Jesus’ admonition to Peter in John 21 to feed his lambs can be interpreted in any number of ways.

    Six churches – St. Luke United Methodist, Salem United Methodist, Flint Ridge Baptist, Fork Hill Baptist, Oakhurst Baptist and Rich Hill Baptist  – are doing just that.

  • Using a variety of discarded objects, art supplies and boxes, students in a recent workshop at the Artisans Center learned how to sort through the subconscious world of their dreams.

    The workshop was taught Saturday at the center by San Francisco artist Barbe Saint John.

    Saint John met local artist Heather Mullins-Teasley through etsy.com, a Web site where artists share and sell their work worldwide.