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Features

  • Summer squash is a great pretender.

    It’s true that a 1-cup (boiled, drained and lightly salted) is low in saturated fat and very low in cholesterol. It’s a good source of vitamin A, thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, calcium, iron, magnesium, phosphorus and cooper.

    But it doesn’t end there.

    When you include dietary fiber, vitamin C, vitamins, B1, B2, B6, folate, potassium and manganese, along with omega-3 fatty acids, squash is a little yellow nutritional powerhouse.

    But at the same time, it’s the biggest liar in the garden patch.

  • For brothers Damon and Devin Mungo, farming has always been a way of life. Between cattle, turkeys jobs and families, the two third-generation farmers take advantage of every hour in the day. The two took over the family farms in 2000 after the death of their father, Dwight.

    Right now, Devin has 220 beef cows and five turkey barns that house 28,000 birds on close to 500 acres. He gets baby turkeys at the age of five weeks old and raises them for 15 more weeks. If that’s not enough, Devin runs a deer processing operation from September through January.

  • This year, families are looking for ways to save money and cut household expenses at the same time. One way to reduce rising food costs is vegetable gardening. Growing your own food and preserving just seems to make sense for many folks trying to spend less while eating healthy. That's the way Larry Ellis sees it. 

    Newcomers to gardening can learn all those tried and true secrets from local growers like Ellis.

  • Earlier this year, 93-year-old Clara Cannucciari became a YouTube darling for a cooking show filmed by her grandson.

    Many of the segments of “Great Depression Cooking with Clara” have generated more than 250,000 views.

    Her recipes for Pasta and Peas, Poorman’s Feast and Egg Drop Soup have been making the rounds.

  • On Aug. 3, White Springs Baptist Church will be 75 years old.

    Since that time at least 40 ministers have gone out from the Erwin Farm-based congregation. And White Springs has been the spiritual home to some of the finest athletes ever to play at Lancaster High School.

    Sometimes these two attributes meshed, as in the case of the Rev. Buford Hayes, a 1954 LHS graduate.

    Hayes, a receiver, is acknowledged by those who can remember as one of the finest football players ever to don the Blue Hurricane uniform, as the team was known at the time.

  • Those in search of local crafts and crops won’t have to look too far Saturday.

    They will be available at the Lancaster Street Market in the green space at the corner of Main and Gay streets.

    A collaboration of the Lancaster Downtown Business Association, the city of Lancaster and See Lancaster, which promotes local tourism, the street markets are held the first Saturday of the month.

    There has been one slight change in the time, said Peggy Little, director of See Lancaster.

  • From what I’m hearing from my friends, the Lancaster County Community Garden is a success.

    The garden, which was spearheaded by the United Way of Lancaster County and Lancaster County Parks and Recreation, was planted on some land near the Springdale Recreation Center.

    Those willing to weed and care for the garden were given plots, to raise food for themselves or donate to local food banks.

  • Thousands of people donate blood in our area each year, and their generous gift has saved countless lives.

    But, the need for blood is constant.

    This summer the American Red Cross is encouraging Americans to “Change Lives Together” by giving blood, said Gina Amato, local executive director.

    “During the busy summer season, the blood supply often suffers,” she said. “With donors on vacation and preoccupied with other summer activities, collections tend to take a dip.”

  • At age 77, William Reid doesn’t get around that well and prefers to ride his mower to the small garden beside his Culp Ferguson Road home.

    Behind the mower is a small trailer loaded with hoes, clippers, rakes and a Garden Weasel cultivator.

    However, those tools aren’t getting much use this summer. The same goes for the almost-new garden tiller parked in Reid’s shed.

    It hasn’t been cranked all year, which is expected, since Reid decided against using it.

  • "Walt Disney" and "Bonanza' were interrupted on Sunday, July 20, 1969. I missed the "Little Rascals" and "Tarzan" that day, too, but I didn’t care.

    I was focused on what was happening some 238,000-plus miles away.

    Only 8, it was way past my bedtime and I was lying on a homemade quilt on the den floor with my favorite pillow staring at the RCA television set. A window air conditioner was whirring away in the background.

  • Some lessons are never forgotten

    Barely out of his teens, Mickey Perry was proud as a peacock.

    He had just sold a set of new tires to a customer at his dad’s, the late Herman Perry’s North Main Gulf Station.

    But a second look at the tire guide showed something else. Mickey had a problem and needed Herman Perry’s sage advice.

  • A forecast for dry, windy and hot days will always increase the chance for wildfires.

    Accooring to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), a wildfire is an uncontrollable fire spreading through vegetative fuels that exposes and possibly consumes structures in its path. They often begin unnoticed, spread quickly and are usually signaled by dense smoke that fills the area for miles around.

  • There’s some good news and some bad news.

    The good news? Fresh blackberries are in abundance right now in thickets growing along fences, roadways and in pastures.

    The bad news comes with the territory. As good as they taste, picking plump, sweet blackberries has always been, and will always be, a rather thorny subject.

    You have to fight through layers of thorns that hold on for dear life as you try to pull the dark blue, purple fruit from its hiding place.    

    Ouch!

  • The Pregnancy Care Center, 718 S. Main St., has joined forces with HELP Crisis Pregnancy Center in Monroe, N.C., to aid women and families experiencing an unplanned pregnancy.

    The Monroe Center recently started a Mobile Ultrasound Ministry which provides pregnancy testing and limited ultrasounds, free of charge.

    Amy Vincent, Pregnancy Care Center executive director, said it has already been established that ultrasound has a profound effect on abortion-minded women.

  • There’s a piece of fluorescent orange poster paper taped on the office wall inside the Lancaster County Parks and Recreation Department swimming pool on Wylie Street.

    Listed below the contact information for a welder and two swimming pool supply companies is David Taylor’s name and phone number.

    That’s pretty amazing, since Taylor isn’t on the county payroll. You would think that pool manager Midenna Anderson’s name would be listed first.

  • Sevin dust might be a gardener’s best friend, but it is a beekeeper’s worst nightmare.

    Just ask Robert Lee Steele; he wears both a farmer’s cap and a beekeeper’s sun helmet.

    Steele recently lost a gallon of honeybees from his hives to Sevin dust.

  • Legend has it that enlisted soldiers came up with a phrase after noticing how their mess hall portions of pork always contained shoulder and leg cuts, while officers got top loin, pork chops and ham.

    They called it “livin’ high off the hog.”

    Given that, you wouldn’t think bacon – meat taken from the sides, belly or back of a pig that’s been cured, smoked or both – would be so sought-after by foodies, chefs in five-star eateries and TV cooking shows.

  • Sometimes the circumstances of everyday life consume, drain and overwhelm us.

    During trying times, we turn to friends, family and, most of all, our faith.

    A year ago, Patience Wood, director of health services for United Hospice of the Piedmont in Chester, was going through a season of challenges in her own life.

    After facing a bitter divorce and accompanying child custody issues, Wood said she was searching for a deeper understanding of how to survive the hurt.

  • GREAT FALLS – When Cherry Doster was growing up in Great Falls, a visit to Eagle’s Five and Ten Cents Store on Dearborn Street was quite a treat.

    She walked past a line of thriving businesses to get there.

    Now, most of those businesses are boarded up by sheets of painted plywood. Sidewalk awnings are faded and torn. Portions of the broken intricate tile work in front of the old dime store have been patched and filled with concrete.

  • Local produce is now available and consumers are taking advantage of it.

    The Lancaster County Farmer’s Market on Pageland Highway is in full swing, along with the Lancaster County Fruit and Vegetable Growers Association farmer’s market at Ace Hardware on South Market Street.

    The county market is open on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays. The fruit and vegetable grower’s market is open on Wednesday and Saturday mornings.

    Local farmer Don Gowan said the county market is enjoying a banner year. He said the vendor count has almost doubled.