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Features

  • Right after the light switch gets cut on each school morning, the frenzy begins.

    Getting kids up and ready for school is hectic. Depending on their age, getting them to eat a balanced breakfast is almost impossible.

    And whatever their early morning mood – in a rush to get them out the door on time when the clock is ticking – one of the first things to get neglected is a healthy breakfast.

    If you can get them to sit still long enough for a couple of bites of something they won’t turn their noses up at, consider yourself lucky.

  • The significance of the fire that damaged the Lancaster County Courthouse fire on Aug. 4, 2008, wasn’t lost on Walter Lee Tillman.

    But Tillman’s feelings for the 181-year-old structure that Robert Mills designed go well beyond its role as a house of justice.

    For Tillman and the 160-plus members of St. Paul AME Church, the courthouse is the house of worship they trace their religious roots to.

    While St. Paul AME will celebrate its 114th anniversary on Aug. 29-30 at its Pleasant Hill Street home, its tie to the historic courthouse remains binding.

  • If you can, stop by the Springs House, 201 W. Gay St., to see the recent landscaping. 

    The Lancaster County Council of the Arts is so pleased that the gardens around the historic building are now so much more beautiful. 

    We would like to thank the city of Lancaster for the wonderful plantings, fountain, pathways, arches and benches that were added, along with an the irrigation system to help care for all of it. 

    The addition of ferns and new rocking chairs have also given the front porch a true Southern charm. 

  • When it comes to inspiration and sound biblical teaching, women often turn to the ministry of Beth Moore.

    Now women across the nation will get a chance to hear the best-selling author firsthand without having to leave town during a simulcast that will be broadcast live via satellite Aug. 28-29.  

    Lancaster’s Second Baptist Church, 1426 Great Falls Highway, has been selected as one of 650 churches in the United States to host the women’s event, said Kathy Stepp, leader of the Women’s Ministry Team there.

  • KERSHAW – Darryl Pierce doesn’t teach high school family and consumer science (home economics).

    The former elementary school teacher is now the instructional facilitator at Andrew Jackson Middle School.

    In that role, he supports both students and teachers alike in the learning process so that both are successful.

    However, if Pierce cooks as good as he sews, teaching home economics wouldn’t be a stretch.

  • The Spinners’ roots can be found in Michigan’s Royal Oak Township when childhood friends there started singing together for fun in 1954.

    Their five-part harmony became legendary solid gold Philadelphia soul that has sold millions of records and chart-topping songs and led to a spot in the Vocal Group Hall of Fame.

    With hits like “Rubberband Man” and “Then Came You,” the Spinners will kick off the 2009-10 University of South Carolina at Lancaster Performing Arts Series at 7:30 p.m. Aug. 29.

  • Peach cobbler, ice cream, pie and breakfast cereal topper. Somehow, the mention of  such those tasty treats doesn’t match with a fruit loaded with fiber, great vitamins (A, C and E) and packed with nutrients.

    But that’s exactly what you get with a fresh peaches.

    Somewhat sensitive and temperamental, peaches bruise easily and have to be handled with kid gloves.

    When handled with care, a ripe South Carolina peach is summer at its best.

  • Nothing hurts quite like losing a good dog. I experienced that just before Christmas, with the passing of Speckles.

    Almost 15 years old, Speckles wasn’t your typical dalmatian. She was a member of our family.

    Because of that, I debated long and hard about getting another dog and didn’t do so until the time was right.

    However, the one decision I did make was to adopt a dog from Lancaster County Animal Shelter.

    It’s kinda like the starfish-on-the-beach story.

  • At 6 p.m. Sunday, Pat McManus will join more than 100 of her brothers and sisters in Christ to raise her voice in song during the annual Moriah Association Mass Choir Concert at Second Baptist Church.

    “We aren’t professional singers, but when we blend our voices together, it’s always beautiful,” said McManus, who has been a choir member at White Springs Baptist Church since 1959. “The chance to sing in front of that many people is just an awesome experience.”

  • The chances of a high school teacher and four of his students climbing to the top of gospel music charts are pretty unlikely.

    The odds of them remaining there for almost half of a century are even higher, but that’s just what the Inspirations have done.

    Known as one of the most consistent, solid and successful Southern gospel groups, the Inspirations will be in concert at 7 p.m. Friday at Second Baptist Church.

    That just goes to show the Inspirations’ sound is timeless, said Dennis Nichols of GlennMark Promotions.

  • Lauren Rowell knew the opportunity to play softball on an international stage in Eastern Europe last month at the Youth Friendship Games was a once in a lifetime chance.

    But that notion didn’t really sink in for the rising eighth grader at Buford Middle School until the last out was made.

    Rowell, 13, was selected by her United States teammates as its most valuable player in a fast-pitch softball tournament featuring four international softball teams in the 11-to-14 age bracket.

  • Summer squash is a great pretender.

    It’s true that a 1-cup (boiled, drained and lightly salted) is low in saturated fat and very low in cholesterol. It’s a good source of vitamin A, thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, calcium, iron, magnesium, phosphorus and cooper.

    But it doesn’t end there.

    When you include dietary fiber, vitamin C, vitamins, B1, B2, B6, folate, potassium and manganese, along with omega-3 fatty acids, squash is a little yellow nutritional powerhouse.

    But at the same time, it’s the biggest liar in the garden patch.

  • For brothers Damon and Devin Mungo, farming has always been a way of life. Between cattle, turkeys jobs and families, the two third-generation farmers take advantage of every hour in the day. The two took over the family farms in 2000 after the death of their father, Dwight.

    Right now, Devin has 220 beef cows and five turkey barns that house 28,000 birds on close to 500 acres. He gets baby turkeys at the age of five weeks old and raises them for 15 more weeks. If that’s not enough, Devin runs a deer processing operation from September through January.

  • This year, families are looking for ways to save money and cut household expenses at the same time. One way to reduce rising food costs is vegetable gardening. Growing your own food and preserving just seems to make sense for many folks trying to spend less while eating healthy. That's the way Larry Ellis sees it. 

    Newcomers to gardening can learn all those tried and true secrets from local growers like Ellis.

  • Earlier this year, 93-year-old Clara Cannucciari became a YouTube darling for a cooking show filmed by her grandson.

    Many of the segments of “Great Depression Cooking with Clara” have generated more than 250,000 views.

    Her recipes for Pasta and Peas, Poorman’s Feast and Egg Drop Soup have been making the rounds.

  • On Aug. 3, White Springs Baptist Church will be 75 years old.

    Since that time at least 40 ministers have gone out from the Erwin Farm-based congregation. And White Springs has been the spiritual home to some of the finest athletes ever to play at Lancaster High School.

    Sometimes these two attributes meshed, as in the case of the Rev. Buford Hayes, a 1954 LHS graduate.

    Hayes, a receiver, is acknowledged by those who can remember as one of the finest football players ever to don the Blue Hurricane uniform, as the team was known at the time.

  • Those in search of local crafts and crops won’t have to look too far Saturday.

    They will be available at the Lancaster Street Market in the green space at the corner of Main and Gay streets.

    A collaboration of the Lancaster Downtown Business Association, the city of Lancaster and See Lancaster, which promotes local tourism, the street markets are held the first Saturday of the month.

    There has been one slight change in the time, said Peggy Little, director of See Lancaster.

  • From what I’m hearing from my friends, the Lancaster County Community Garden is a success.

    The garden, which was spearheaded by the United Way of Lancaster County and Lancaster County Parks and Recreation, was planted on some land near the Springdale Recreation Center.

    Those willing to weed and care for the garden were given plots, to raise food for themselves or donate to local food banks.

  • Thousands of people donate blood in our area each year, and their generous gift has saved countless lives.

    But, the need for blood is constant.

    This summer the American Red Cross is encouraging Americans to “Change Lives Together” by giving blood, said Gina Amato, local executive director.

    “During the busy summer season, the blood supply often suffers,” she said. “With donors on vacation and preoccupied with other summer activities, collections tend to take a dip.”

  • At age 77, William Reid doesn’t get around that well and prefers to ride his mower to the small garden beside his Culp Ferguson Road home.

    Behind the mower is a small trailer loaded with hoes, clippers, rakes and a Garden Weasel cultivator.

    However, those tools aren’t getting much use this summer. The same goes for the almost-new garden tiller parked in Reid’s shed.

    It hasn’t been cranked all year, which is expected, since Reid decided against using it.