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Features

  • In the early 1950s, McIlwain Road was a sleepy dirt road community that wasn’t much more than a short cut from Lancaster to Heath Springs.

    But about half way down it, something was happening, a group of dedicated church members from the area led by the Rev. J.L. Maloney were hard at work.

    When they weren’t working on their area farms or waiting for the mill whistle to blow, they were busy laying bricks to build Oak Ridge ARP Church.

    It might have taken a decade to build the mission church, but it was a labor of love.

  • In 1969, Tom McGail, a drummer in a southern Ohio wannabe band, was watching the 1939 Errol Flynn and Olivia De Havilland classic, “Dodge City,” on late night TV.

    The movie’s plot centers around the attempt of drifter and newly appointed Sheriff Wade Hatton (Flynn) to root out stampedes, brawls, henchmen, chaos and evil from the lawless Kansas town.

    To help, a local women’s temperance union joins in the fight.

  • The TV and radio news reported all day that Hurricane Hugo would hit the South Carolina coast near Charleston, but there was no mention of it coming inland. The order was given for the coastal areas to evacuate.

  • Regina Butz may be the only person in the United States who has wedding and hurricane photos together in the same album.

    Butz, owner of Ace Hardware and Garden Center, and her husband, Tom, eloped to St. Croix in the U.S. Virgin Islands on Sept. 16, 1989, for their wedding.

    This wasn’t one of those typical “run off and get married” deals without permission. The couple, in their late 20s, planned their nuptials in great detail and their families knew what was going on.

  • The symbol for Autism Speaks is a blue puzzle piece.

    If you don’t understand the significance of it, just ask Evelyn Springs.

    She’ll tell you about Malik, 7, and how the disease that few understand has affected her grandson.

    Diagnosed with autism at age 2, Malik doesn’t talk much about it.

    That’s because he doesn’t talk.

  • Joe Cahn has the best job in America.

    He is the self-proclaimed commissioner of tailgating, a job he invented in 1996 after selling his business, the New Orleans School of Cooking. He also sold his house and bought a motor home.

    Since then, Cahn has traveled to all 31 NFL stadiums, nine NASCAR tracks and 123 college football stadiums.

    He was in Foxboro, Mass., on Monday night for the Patriots’ home opener against the Buffalo Bills.

    It can be a busy profession, but the recently-married Cahn said it has his wife’s seal of approval.

  • The late Lester Robinson, former managing editor of The Lancaster News, said it better that I ever could in the Dec. 13, 1995, edition.

    In a column about the death of Lavoy Darlington Bauknight two days prior, Robinson wrote, “When the Rev. and Mrs. P.L. Bauknight moved into the First United Methodist Church parsonage in the mid-1930s, little did Lancaster people know then what an impact their son would have here.”

    To be honest, that might be an understatement.

  • With its different colors and textures, sushi is edible art.

    I can’t remember when I first tried this exotic, aesthetically pleasing Japanese delight. I don’t do the eel, salmon or raw fish varieties. I’m happy with some crab, spicy shrimp or vegetarian sushi.

    On a recent Saturday night, I had the joy of eating dinner with Donna and Cecil Weaver of Lancaster. Donna, whose heritage includes Japanese, is from Hawaii, which has its own unique twist on sushi.

  • Looking for something to do with your family Saturday? 

    Bring them to the Springdale Recreation Center for the 2009 Pregnancy Care Center’s Walk for Life.

    Amy Vincent, executive director of the Pregnancy Care Center, said its volunteers have worked hard to make this a family-friendly fundraiser. 

    “We have added activities for the children, including several large inflatables, volleyball, face painting, balloons, refreshments and door prizes,” she said.

    It’s easy to take part in the walk.

  • Local attorney Rick Chandler knows the law. It’s especially clear when it comes to wearing seat belts.

    But there are some things you just don’t forget. He said experiencing death first hand as an 8 year old will do that.

    That day in 1963, Rick was hanging with his dad, the late Richard Chandler, at the family-run body shop when the police radio went off for a wreck call.

    The elder Chandler was out the door in record time to the scene, with his young son riding shotgun.

  • The cross is there. If you look for it hard enough, you’ll find it. It’s in the most unlikely of places.

    It’s nailed to the roof line, hanging beneath a tin shed at the Riverside Rodeo Arena. It’s above two sets of old gym bleachers painted blue and flanked by a portable welding machine.

    There are two old church pews against one side of the shed, but at Carolinas Cowboy Church – a place where the offering is collected in a cowboy hat – the padded benches look out of place.

  • NEWBERRY – These days, Division II Newberry College doesn’t have an official mascot.

    Under pressure from the NCAA in 2008, their Indians nickname was dropped and the spear disappeared from their helmets and was replaced by an “N”

    When football players reported for preseason drills that fall, Lancaster native and Newberry head football coach Todd Knight said they were told the “N” on the side stood for no.

  • Forty-three years ago, the sparse landscaping of Frank and Ann Ferguson’s yard at 962 Anderson Road consisted of a few small trees and rocks.

    Most weekends, the Fergusons could be found picking up rocks until they could plant grass.

    All that work has finally paid off. Now, six large oak trees form a canopy covering the entire front and back lawns. 

    The Fergusons gradually added shade-loving plants to transform their yard into a neighborhood showplace. 

  • Right after the light switch gets cut on each school morning, the frenzy begins.

    Getting kids up and ready for school is hectic. Depending on their age, getting them to eat a balanced breakfast is almost impossible.

    And whatever their early morning mood – in a rush to get them out the door on time when the clock is ticking – one of the first things to get neglected is a healthy breakfast.

    If you can get them to sit still long enough for a couple of bites of something they won’t turn their noses up at, consider yourself lucky.

  • The significance of the fire that damaged the Lancaster County Courthouse fire on Aug. 4, 2008, wasn’t lost on Walter Lee Tillman.

    But Tillman’s feelings for the 181-year-old structure that Robert Mills designed go well beyond its role as a house of justice.

    For Tillman and the 160-plus members of St. Paul AME Church, the courthouse is the house of worship they trace their religious roots to.

    While St. Paul AME will celebrate its 114th anniversary on Aug. 29-30 at its Pleasant Hill Street home, its tie to the historic courthouse remains binding.

  • If you can, stop by the Springs House, 201 W. Gay St., to see the recent landscaping. 

    The Lancaster County Council of the Arts is so pleased that the gardens around the historic building are now so much more beautiful. 

    We would like to thank the city of Lancaster for the wonderful plantings, fountain, pathways, arches and benches that were added, along with an the irrigation system to help care for all of it. 

    The addition of ferns and new rocking chairs have also given the front porch a true Southern charm. 

  • When it comes to inspiration and sound biblical teaching, women often turn to the ministry of Beth Moore.

    Now women across the nation will get a chance to hear the best-selling author firsthand without having to leave town during a simulcast that will be broadcast live via satellite Aug. 28-29.  

    Lancaster’s Second Baptist Church, 1426 Great Falls Highway, has been selected as one of 650 churches in the United States to host the women’s event, said Kathy Stepp, leader of the Women’s Ministry Team there.

  • KERSHAW – Darryl Pierce doesn’t teach high school family and consumer science (home economics).

    The former elementary school teacher is now the instructional facilitator at Andrew Jackson Middle School.

    In that role, he supports both students and teachers alike in the learning process so that both are successful.

    However, if Pierce cooks as good as he sews, teaching home economics wouldn’t be a stretch.

  • The Spinners’ roots can be found in Michigan’s Royal Oak Township when childhood friends there started singing together for fun in 1954.

    Their five-part harmony became legendary solid gold Philadelphia soul that has sold millions of records and chart-topping songs and led to a spot in the Vocal Group Hall of Fame.

    With hits like “Rubberband Man” and “Then Came You,” the Spinners will kick off the 2009-10 University of South Carolina at Lancaster Performing Arts Series at 7:30 p.m. Aug. 29.

  • Peach cobbler, ice cream, pie and breakfast cereal topper. Somehow, the mention of  such those tasty treats doesn’t match with a fruit loaded with fiber, great vitamins (A, C and E) and packed with nutrients.

    But that’s exactly what you get with a fresh peaches.

    Somewhat sensitive and temperamental, peaches bruise easily and have to be handled with kid gloves.

    When handled with care, a ripe South Carolina peach is summer at its best.