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Features

  • Dr. John Griffin, distinguished professor emeritus at the University of South Carolina, has always been fascinated by the life (and death) of Abraham Lincoln.

    But through the years, Lincoln’s life has grown to such heroic and epic proportions that it’s hard to separate fact from fiction.

    Now Griffin has put together another biography on the 16th president entitled “Mr. Lincoln and His War.”

    Griffin will make a 30-minute slide presentation and sign copies of his latest book at 7 p.m. Oct. 12 at the Lancaster County Library. 

  • Sausage is almost like barbecue. Each region (and sometimes, country) has its own kind that uses ingredients and seasonings common to that specific area.

    It’s sort of like mustard base, vinegar base, ketchup base and white base barbecue sauces. Sausage is what it is, depending on where you live.

    In the South, sausage is usually a mixture of ground pork, pork fat, sage and peppers and other spices that’s made into patties and fried.

  • Janie McManus loves historical fiction.

    For the seventh grade social studies teacher at South Middle School, it’s a way to make the textbook come alive.

    Right now, she is reading “Breadwinner” by Deborah Ellis, to her classes, which is about the Taliban in Afghanistan.

    “Will it be on that big test at the end of the year? Probably not,” she said.

    “But it’s timely and they need to know this stuff.

  • Pure Prairie League still throws T-shirts in the seats before taking the stage.

    The play list for each concert is still taped to the floor beneath each microphone. Some things never change.

    Talk about old school, they still tune guitars in between songs, when needed.

  • Everybody loves it when a “local” makes good, and Lancaster has its share of bragging rights of those who have made their mark.

    You can now add Vickie Bailey Ebbers to the list.

    The Lancaster native is now a nationally-recognized artist who has turned her love of family, friends and even cherished pets into a long list of award-winning paintings.

    Her artwork is now showing in Charlotte as part of the “Carolina’s Got Art,” exhibition at Atherton Mill in the South End Area.

  • When Hazel and Betty Vincent first moved into their home at 112 Survey St. 14 years ago, a manicured lawn was only a pipe dream. 

    Their priority was taking care of Betty’s aging mother. 

    As years passed, Betty lost her mother.

    But Betty found solace for that loss by spending time in her yard. 

    The result is a beautifully landscaped lawn filled with spacious beds providing a variety of blooms and foliage. 

  • The Vivian Major Robinson concert on Oct. 4 will be a first for Lancaster.

    LearnTV will record the recital for playback and also provide the audience with an up-close look at organist Robert P. Glick via a viewing screen during the 2:30 p.m. concert that day at First Presbyterian Church.

    Glick is associate professor of church music and organ at Erskine College and Theological Seminary,

    This is a big change from a normal organ concert.

    For perhaps the first time, you’ll get to see something other than the back of the organist’s head.

  • The Hoppers, America’s “Favorite Family of Gospel Music,” is returning to Lancaster for a 7 p.m. concert today at Second Baptist Church, 1426 Great Falls Highway.

    “This group has been here twice before and is always a fan favorite,” said Dennis Nichols of GlennMark Promotions.

    The group, which started performing as a family ensemble in the late 1950s, includes Claude Hopper, his wife, Connie, their sons Dean and Mike and daughter-in-law Kim Greene Hopper.

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  • In the early 1950s, McIlwain Road was a sleepy dirt road community that wasn’t much more than a short cut from Lancaster to Heath Springs.

    But about half way down it, something was happening, a group of dedicated church members from the area led by the Rev. J.L. Maloney were hard at work.

    When they weren’t working on their area farms or waiting for the mill whistle to blow, they were busy laying bricks to build Oak Ridge ARP Church.

    It might have taken a decade to build the mission church, but it was a labor of love.

  • In 1969, Tom McGail, a drummer in a southern Ohio wannabe band, was watching the 1939 Errol Flynn and Olivia De Havilland classic, “Dodge City,” on late night TV.

    The movie’s plot centers around the attempt of drifter and newly appointed Sheriff Wade Hatton (Flynn) to root out stampedes, brawls, henchmen, chaos and evil from the lawless Kansas town.

    To help, a local women’s temperance union joins in the fight.

  • The TV and radio news reported all day that Hurricane Hugo would hit the South Carolina coast near Charleston, but there was no mention of it coming inland. The order was given for the coastal areas to evacuate.

  • Regina Butz may be the only person in the United States who has wedding and hurricane photos together in the same album.

    Butz, owner of Ace Hardware and Garden Center, and her husband, Tom, eloped to St. Croix in the U.S. Virgin Islands on Sept. 16, 1989, for their wedding.

    This wasn’t one of those typical “run off and get married” deals without permission. The couple, in their late 20s, planned their nuptials in great detail and their families knew what was going on.

  • The symbol for Autism Speaks is a blue puzzle piece.

    If you don’t understand the significance of it, just ask Evelyn Springs.

    She’ll tell you about Malik, 7, and how the disease that few understand has affected her grandson.

    Diagnosed with autism at age 2, Malik doesn’t talk much about it.

    That’s because he doesn’t talk.

  • Joe Cahn has the best job in America.

    He is the self-proclaimed commissioner of tailgating, a job he invented in 1996 after selling his business, the New Orleans School of Cooking. He also sold his house and bought a motor home.

    Since then, Cahn has traveled to all 31 NFL stadiums, nine NASCAR tracks and 123 college football stadiums.

    He was in Foxboro, Mass., on Monday night for the Patriots’ home opener against the Buffalo Bills.

    It can be a busy profession, but the recently-married Cahn said it has his wife’s seal of approval.

  • The late Lester Robinson, former managing editor of The Lancaster News, said it better that I ever could in the Dec. 13, 1995, edition.

    In a column about the death of Lavoy Darlington Bauknight two days prior, Robinson wrote, “When the Rev. and Mrs. P.L. Bauknight moved into the First United Methodist Church parsonage in the mid-1930s, little did Lancaster people know then what an impact their son would have here.”

    To be honest, that might be an understatement.