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Features

  • One cup of strawberries has only 55 calories. They are a great source of vitamin C, with eight strawberries providing 140 percent of the recommended daily intake for kids.

    However, much of that vitamin C  content can be destroyed when strawberries are prepared for eating through coming in contact with extreme heat or soaking in water too long. They are best eaten as soon as possible.

    Strawberries have anti-inflammatory properties and are used by some to treat anemia, joint disease, hormone imbalances and to strengthen the circulatory system.

  • FORT LAWN – Harold Osborne’s Sunday school class at Second Baptist Church got quite a treat on Sunday morning to go with their coffee.

    They were treated to a Strawberry Punch Bowl Cake, courtesy of Marsha Deerman.

    “I’m gonna find out where she’s going to church,” said a laughing David Jordan, the owner of Jordan’s Farms. “That’s better than the deacons visiting.” 

  • Interested?

    WHAT: Camp Clad, (Children Learning About Diabetes) hosted by the diabetes education clinic at the University of South Carolina at Lancaster. The camp is designed to create a fun and safe environment for children, ages 6 to 12, and teens ages 13 to 17 with type 1 diabetes. 

    WHERE: Carole Ray Dowling Health Services Center at USCL, 509 Hubbard Drive

    WHEN: 2 to 4 p.m. June 14-17

    HOW MUCH:

    INFORMATION: (803) 313-7450

    Gregory A. Summers

    gsummers@thelancasternews.com

  • One must have a special eye to visualize the possibilities of a house and yard that have been left unattended for a period of time. 

    When Tony and Nancy Topf first spotted the house at 910 Forest Drive in Lancaster, they were able to see beyond the dense trees and a lawn covered in moss instead of grass. 

    They could even see potential that a house built in the 1950’s would have, once it was painted, a neutral color to blend into the natural surroundings.

  • A debt of gratitude is owed to the 198 soldiers whose names are etched in bronze on the war memorial at Lancaster’s Memorial Park, said Ernest Stroud.

    Stroud, a Korean Conflict veteran and legislative chairman for the S.C. Disabled American Veterans and S.C. American Legion,  didn’t mince words Sunday during the county’s 19th annual Memorial Day program.

    Stroud said too many times politicians and those drawing government salaries tend to forget it’s the war dead who gave their all to protect a way of life that we now enjoy.

  • A debt of gratitude is owed to 198 soldiers whose names are etched in bronze on the war memorial at Lancaster's Memorial Park, said Ernest Stroud.

    Stroud, a Korean Conflict veteran and publicty chairman for DAV Chapter ???, said Lancaster's war dead gave their all to protect a way of life that we now enjoy.

    And its been that way since April 6, 1917 when the United States entered World War I. Stroud said since in the last 93 years, more than 620,000 of America's sons and daughters have made the ultimate sacrifice for freedom. 

  • Many Americans view Memorial Day as the holiday that ushers in summer.

    Others see it as the end of the school year and a time of pomp and circumstance that surrounds high school graduation.

    For some, it is a holiday to rightfully honor the forgotten men and women who served and died to protect America’s freedom.

    But at least one woman – Sally Deese – sees Memorial Day weekend as a chance to say thank you to a group that’s near and dear to her, and that’s what she does through the Golden Age of Merit dinner.

  • Thrill, fill and spill.

    No, those words aren’t meant to describe the twists and turns of an amusement park ride or action adventure show.

    It’s a phrase that’s become a popular way to describe grouping together various plants in one container to create an instant wow factor.

  • The roots of America as a nation can be traced to May 29, 1780, and what happened in a clearing off Rocky River Road in eastern Lancaster County.

    There is little doubt that what happened 230 years ago – when British Lt. Col. Banastre Tarleton’s Green Dragoons clashed with American Col. Abraham Buford’s retreating Virginia Regiment – affected the outcome of the American Revolution, said Wayne Roberts, an archaeologist for the S.C. Department of Transportation.

  • If you were in downtown Lancaster on Feb. 6, 1999, you probably haven’t forgotten an event significant to local history.

    That day, the skeleton of a once-stately Lancaster home began a slow ride from North White Street to its new home on Craig Farm Road.

    Just over a year later, on May 21, 2000, the beautifully restored and enhanced home was dedicated by former Gov. Jim Hodges as Kilburnie, the Inn at Craig Farm.

    Time does fly.

  • At 3 p.m., May 23, Carolina Brass will return to the lawns of Kilburnie, the Inn at Craig Farm, for a special anniversary concert, “Carolina Brass on Broadway.”

    The group performed at the Kilburnie dedication 10 years ago.

  • As Sammie Lathan dives into a plate loaded down with grits, scrambled eggs, salty strips of bacon and white toast slathered in grape jelly, it’s easy to see why JoMars Family Restaurant has such a devoted clientele.

    Lathan, a Lancaster resident, stops by the restaurant for some of his home-cooked favorites at least once a week.

    Today, Lathan pulled up a seat near the famed “Fatback Hotbar” along with his friend, Charles Jones.

  • Would you like to nominate a deserving mother for South Carolina Mother of the Year?

    The S.C. Mother of the Year Search Committee. a non-profit organization that promotes spiritual and moral values in families, is now accepting nominations for S.C. Mother of the Year for 2011.

  • The “singer’s singer” whose voice has touched millions of lives around the world is coming to Lancaster.

    Award winning gospel singer Cynthia Clawson will perform at 11 a.m. Sunday at First Baptist Church.

    “I think being considered a ‘singer’s singer’ means ‘someone can sing for me and I won’t be critical,’” said Clawson, laughing. “As singers, we listen so critically to how others do it. I think it means I can just relax and enjoy when she sings, or at least I hope that’s what it means.”

  • Seven minutes.

    That’s how long it took Wednesday night for the members of First Presbyterian Church to light 175 candles to celebrate its 175th anniversary.

    But those previous 175 years wouldn’t be the issue for the church’s original founders, said Dr. Shane Owens, First Presbyterian pastor.

    Nor would those 175 points of light that illuminated its church sanctuary, along with the 10 stained glass windows Wednesday night.

  • OK, grillmasters everywhere, this one is for you. I feel your pain.

    You have already looked through every Mother’s Day card on the rack, searching for the one that’s perfect for the woman who brought you into the world or for the mother of your children.

    To make matters worse, your bankroll is far from “swole,” which makes it even harder to make her queen for the day.

    The only thing you find stuck in the pockets of the pair of dress shorts you just pulled out of the drawer for the first time this spring is lint.

  • Give mom a gift to remember

    The key to making Mother’s Day special is to make it unforgettable. You don’t have to spent a lot of money to do that, either.

    Here are a few great Mother’s Day gift ideas to think about:

    – Make a gift in her name – If mom has a favorite cause, consider making a charitable donation in honor. Just make sure the organization reflects her personality. Some local charities to consider include the American Red Cross, Christian Services, Family Promise of Lancaster, HOPE in Lancaster and Pregnancy Care Center.

  • You may want to catch a little nap Saturday afternoon.

    That way, you can stay up a little later to watch the post-race celebration in Victory Lane at Darlington Raceway.

    Those festivities might not include your favorite NASCAR driver, but they will include a familiar face.

    Former Lancaster High School homecoming queen Paige Duke is one of three Miss Sprint Cups for 2010. The lineup includes Duke, Amanda Wright of York, Maine, and Monica Palumbo of Charlotte.

  • If you drive along Plantation Road from time to time, you have probably noticed the lush, shady yards.

    One of them, the home of Mack and Sara Eddins (at the corner of Plantation Road and Malvern Lane), is quite eye-catching this time of year and really stands out.

    Masses of Knockout rose bushes covered with bright blooms, accompanied by red and yellow barberry bushes, create one of the prettiest corners in Forest Hills.

    The Lancaster Council of Garden Clubs agrees, and has designated the Eddins’ yard as April Yard of the Month.

  • The impact of Lancaster’s First Presbyterian Church in the community can be measured by a casual stroll through the Old Presbyterian Church cemetery on West Gay St.

    “You can walk among the graves there and feel the presence of old Lancasterville,” said local historian Lindsay Pettus.

    The graves of Lancaster’s first mayor, Andrew Mayer, can be found there, along with two former editors of the Lancaster Ledger, which started in 1852.