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Features

  • For years, I’ve heard cooking experts extol the virtues of using fresh herbs to transform ordinary meals into extraordinary meals.

    That kind of talk got my attention.

    But instead of picking fresh herbs at the grocery store, I decided to grow my own.

    Guess what? They were right.

    I have become a planter box cook, with basil, rosemary and thyme growing right outside our back door.

    They not only boost flavor, they also allow you to cut back on salt, fat and sugar to allow for a cleaner taste.

  • The Band of Oz will kick up plenty of shaggin’ sand at 7:30 p.m. Saturday as the opening act for the 2010-11 See Lancaster SC Performing Arts Series.

    One of the biggest acts in beach music history, the Band of Oz was formed in1967 by friends who played together in the Rose High School Stage Band (Greenville, N.C.).

    At the time, their only goal was to make a little money as a part-time band playing frat parties and high school proms.

    However, their non-stop, fan-friendly stage shows and tight, horn section sound soon drew the attention of record labels.

  • It happens on Saturday mornings from April through late October.

    A gung-ho, do-it-yourselfer steps outside, breathes deeply and heads to the shed to get out the mower.

    He checks the fluids, adjusts the throttle and either pulls the crank cord or turns the ignition switch.

    Nothing happens.

    Then, he wastes half the day trying to get the mower started. And if it doesn’t, he loads up the mower to take it to a repair shop on Monday.

  • Diana Knight doesn’t take America’s favorite pastime for granted.

    Running the bases matters, but then again, so do jump balls, 4-6-7-10 splits, and cheering for those who do.

    The problem is not everyone is on equal footing when it comes to game-winning hits, bowling strikes, free throws and pom-poms.

    But thanks to the Dream Team, the odds of disabled young people in Lancaster from ages 6 to 21 being enjoying those simple things on equal footing have greatly improved.

  • The hardest part of getting ready for the first day of school on Monday?

    No, it’s not deciding what to wear.

    The real challenge is coming up with school lunch ideas that are fresh, nutritious and fun. That way, the lunch box isn’t full when they come home Monday afternoon.

    Livening up a school lunch box so that its contents don’t end up in the trash isn’t that hard, according to Clemson University’s Janis Hunter and Katherine Cason.

  • Growing up, Jeff Whisnant always figured he’d drive an 18-wheeler for a living.

    But sometimes childhood plans don’t quite work out. Only part of that one did.

    “I just drive a bus, instead,” he said.

    When that bus crosses the state line into Lancaster County today, he will be behind the wheel. His wife, Susan, and their sons, Austin, 16, and Ethan, 13, will be on it, along with Aaron Hise and Eric Ollis.

    That bus has become a way of life for the Whisnants, one of the leading trios in Southern gospel music.

  • The women of Eastside Baptist Church are taking a leap of faith. 

    For the first time ever, they will be hosting a women’s conference, presented by New Desire Christian Ministries, on Friday and Saturday.

    New Desire Christian Ministries is a nondenominational ministry founded on the truths taught in God’s Word. It is led by Brenda Robinson and her evangelist husband, Dan.

  •  

    Want to help?

    WHAT: A benefit Southern gospel music singing for Jerry Scott, featuring the Good News Trio and King’s Cause

    WHEN: 7 p.m. Aug. 14

    WHERE: Kershaw Second Baptist Church, 7737 Kershaw Camden Highway

    HOW MUCH: Free, with 100 percent of a love offering going to defray Scott’s medical expenses

  • On July 25-31, the members of Second Baptist Church put their faith in action through The Way, an initiative that focuses on the needs of others.

    There was an array of mission-themed activities to choose from, ranging from washing cars to health care and reaching out to bikers.

    “We go out to mow a lawn, but that’s not the ultimate goal,” said Larry Helm, who oversees pastoral care at Second Baptist Church. “The purpose of The Way is sharing God’s love.”

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    Zachary Justice is flying to New York City today.

    On Thursday morning, the 10-year-old will soak in the sights and sounds of Times Square, with his parents, Felicia and Daryl Dube.

    But this isn’t some pie-in-the-sky, last-minute vacation for the fifth-grader, who returns to Buford Elementary School on Aug. 16.

    This Big Apple adventure has nothing to do with Zach or his parents.

    If they had their way, they’d be right here in Lancaster.

    This visit has everything to do with the Dubes’ youngest son, Carter.

  • Tom and Anne Laney renewed their marriage vows July 24 in a far-from-ordinary celebration.

    In an eclectic blend of formal and casual, their family and friends gathered in their shady backyard to celebrate. One area was transformed into an outdoor “chapel” for the ceremony, while other areas were set up for food and refreshments.

    A memory table displayed the couple’s wedding photo, mementos, photo albums and other family treasures.

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    Did you know?

  • As a veteran stage and screen actor, Clarence Felder is serious about every part he plays. In movies, Felder is often called on to play the heavy, tough guy.

    His roles include Herman Goering in the stage performance of “Goering at Nurememberg” and Auschwitiz prison camp Commandant Josef Kramer in the movie, “Playing for Time.”

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  • You don’t have to tell Amanda Ardrey and Mallory McDow that the temperature climbed to almost 95 degrees on Saturday, July 10. The humidity was a stuffy, sticky 95 percent that day, too.

    “It was hot, hot, hot,” said Amanda, 7.

    Hot enough that the two enterprising girls went through six gallons of lemonade at their homemade stand on Freemont Drive in the Arrowood subdivision.

    “We sat there for hours,” 8-year-old Mallory said. “We had a tree and two chairs, so we were OK.”

  • In most cases, bee stings are a minor problem that can be treated at home. Here’s how:

    – A bee will leave behind a stinger attached to a venom sac. Look for a small dark object like a splinter. Try to remove it as quickly as possible with tweezers. The stinger is a self-contained unit that includes a barb, a venom sac and muscles that can continue to pump venom into the bloodstream for 20 minutes after it was left behind. Wasps, yellow jackets and hornets don't leave their stingers in the skin.

  • In the PS2 game, “Garfield: Lasagna World Tour,” the lovable orange cat explores Egypt, Italy and Mexico in search of clues needed to win his weight in his favorite dish.

    In the world of video games, that might work.

    But in real life, Garfield might be headed in the wrong direction. He won’t find a whiff of lasagna in “the Boot,” the Land of the Pharaohs or in the City of Palaces.

    According to the BBC, he would only find his one love in Great Britain.

    That’s right.

    Blimey!

  • Charlie Bundy would rather be safe than sorry.

    If Bundy is out working at his farm in the Tabernacle community or anywhere he might encounter a bee, hornet, wasp or yellow jacket, he will have an emergency epinephrine autoinject (EpiPen) nearby.

    Epinephrine is used to treat life-threatening allergic reactions to insect bites, foods, medications, latex and other allergens.

    “I’m going to be cautious,” Bundy said. “Sometimes, you can spend all day out in the country and not see a soul. You do what you have to do, I guess.”

  • Some legal matters are so important that they make it before the U.S. Supreme Court.

    In 1893, one of the greatest legal cases of all time was put to rest when Chief Justice Melville Fuller and associate judges Stephen Field, John Harlan, Horace Gray, Samuel Blatchford, David Brewer, Henry Brown, George Shiras Jr. and Howell Jackson unanimously ruled that a tomato was indeed a vegetable and not a fruit.

    No, this is not some gag.  The case – Nix v. Hedden – addressed whether a tomato was classified as a fruit or vegetable.

  • For Bill Stokes, nothing matches the serenity of paddling the Catawba River on a crisp, early fall morning.

    “I can talk about it for hours,” Stokes said. “You arrive at sunrise when there’s a little mist on the water before the crowd gets out. There’s just no better place to watch birds and wildlife.”  

    That love of nature is why Stokes took up kayaking a little more than 12 years ago. He paddles somewhere just about every weekend.

    Sure, it’s a chance to get some exercise and enjoy Mother Nature at her best.