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Features

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    Zachary Justice is flying to New York City today.

    On Thursday morning, the 10-year-old will soak in the sights and sounds of Times Square, with his parents, Felicia and Daryl Dube.

    But this isn’t some pie-in-the-sky, last-minute vacation for the fifth-grader, who returns to Buford Elementary School on Aug. 16.

    This Big Apple adventure has nothing to do with Zach or his parents.

    If they had their way, they’d be right here in Lancaster.

    This visit has everything to do with the Dubes’ youngest son, Carter.

  • Tom and Anne Laney renewed their marriage vows July 24 in a far-from-ordinary celebration.

    In an eclectic blend of formal and casual, their family and friends gathered in their shady backyard to celebrate. One area was transformed into an outdoor “chapel” for the ceremony, while other areas were set up for food and refreshments.

    A memory table displayed the couple’s wedding photo, mementos, photo albums and other family treasures.

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    Did you know?

  • As a veteran stage and screen actor, Clarence Felder is serious about every part he plays. In movies, Felder is often called on to play the heavy, tough guy.

    His roles include Herman Goering in the stage performance of “Goering at Nurememberg” and Auschwitiz prison camp Commandant Josef Kramer in the movie, “Playing for Time.”

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  • You don’t have to tell Amanda Ardrey and Mallory McDow that the temperature climbed to almost 95 degrees on Saturday, July 10. The humidity was a stuffy, sticky 95 percent that day, too.

    “It was hot, hot, hot,” said Amanda, 7.

    Hot enough that the two enterprising girls went through six gallons of lemonade at their homemade stand on Freemont Drive in the Arrowood subdivision.

    “We sat there for hours,” 8-year-old Mallory said. “We had a tree and two chairs, so we were OK.”

  • In most cases, bee stings are a minor problem that can be treated at home. Here’s how:

    – A bee will leave behind a stinger attached to a venom sac. Look for a small dark object like a splinter. Try to remove it as quickly as possible with tweezers. The stinger is a self-contained unit that includes a barb, a venom sac and muscles that can continue to pump venom into the bloodstream for 20 minutes after it was left behind. Wasps, yellow jackets and hornets don't leave their stingers in the skin.

  • In the PS2 game, “Garfield: Lasagna World Tour,” the lovable orange cat explores Egypt, Italy and Mexico in search of clues needed to win his weight in his favorite dish.

    In the world of video games, that might work.

    But in real life, Garfield might be headed in the wrong direction. He won’t find a whiff of lasagna in “the Boot,” the Land of the Pharaohs or in the City of Palaces.

    According to the BBC, he would only find his one love in Great Britain.

    That’s right.

    Blimey!

  • Charlie Bundy would rather be safe than sorry.

    If Bundy is out working at his farm in the Tabernacle community or anywhere he might encounter a bee, hornet, wasp or yellow jacket, he will have an emergency epinephrine autoinject (EpiPen) nearby.

    Epinephrine is used to treat life-threatening allergic reactions to insect bites, foods, medications, latex and other allergens.

    “I’m going to be cautious,” Bundy said. “Sometimes, you can spend all day out in the country and not see a soul. You do what you have to do, I guess.”

  • Some legal matters are so important that they make it before the U.S. Supreme Court.

    In 1893, one of the greatest legal cases of all time was put to rest when Chief Justice Melville Fuller and associate judges Stephen Field, John Harlan, Horace Gray, Samuel Blatchford, David Brewer, Henry Brown, George Shiras Jr. and Howell Jackson unanimously ruled that a tomato was indeed a vegetable and not a fruit.

    No, this is not some gag.  The case – Nix v. Hedden – addressed whether a tomato was classified as a fruit or vegetable.

  • For Bill Stokes, nothing matches the serenity of paddling the Catawba River on a crisp, early fall morning.

    “I can talk about it for hours,” Stokes said. “You arrive at sunrise when there’s a little mist on the water before the crowd gets out. There’s just no better place to watch birds and wildlife.”  

    That love of nature is why Stokes took up kayaking a little more than 12 years ago. He paddles somewhere just about every weekend.

    Sure, it’s a chance to get some exercise and enjoy Mother Nature at her best.

  • Ron Edwards was grateful to see Monday afternoon’s heavy downpour.

    Edwards, general manager of The Springs Farm in Fort Mill, said right now, crops there can use all the rain Mother Nature provides.

    “It’s taken a toll,” Edwards said of the recent heat wave. “The tomatoes and squash will take as much water as you can give them.”

    But the recent rainfall will have very little impact on the ripening peaches that growers are busy harvesting.

  •  McKenna Phillips of Elgin community waves to the crowd during the annual Charlesboro Fourth of July parade on Saturday. Charlesboro, Heath Springs and Rich Hill each held their Independence Day parades Saturday. They were held a day early since July 4 is on Sunday this year.

    A group of four-wheelers makes its way down Taxahaw Road in the Charlesboro parade Saturday.

  • The Pageland Watermelon Festival 2010 will be spectacular, offering a variety of fun-filled, family entertainment and events for the young and the young-at-heart.

    Thousands of visitors from throughout the Southeast travel to Pageland every summer to enjoy one of the largest festivals in South Carolina.

    The downtown festivities will kick off at 3 p.m. today. You can enjoy amusement rides, magic shows, the balloon man and other live entertainment in Moore’s Park at the gazebo.

  • Some 19 years ago, Midenna Anderson showed up at the Lancaster County Pool to watch her daughter, Emily Anderson McCain, practice for an upcoming Lancaster Swim Team meet.

    The longtime McDonald Green Elementary School kindergarten teacher said she plopped down in a lounge chair to observe.

    “That was all I was here for,” Anderson said.

    All of that changed when former swim team coach Lynn Hammond saw Anderson sitting there. Anderson readily admits that at that time, she knew little about triple kicks, arm flies and negative splits.

  • By the time Andy Harper made it to the Lancaster County Fruit and Vegetable Growers’ Association Market at Ace Hardware on South Market Street on Wednesday morning, the pickings were slim.

    There wasn’t any okra, squash and cucumbers left.

    But that was OK. Harper still drove off with a bag of hot green and red peppers and 2 pounds of tomatoes grown by Nathaniel and Mae Barber.

    What is different about this market is the crops sold there are grown in Lancaster.

  • Since its introduction in mid-April, Kentucky Fried Chicken has sold more than 10 million of its first-ever bun-less chicken sandwich, the KFC Double Down.

    But the one-of-a-kind sandwich, has sparked a nutritional outcry from critics.

    Why?

    Made with two thick, white meat chicken filets, two pieces of bacon, two melted slices of Monterrey Jack and pepper jack cheese and the “Colonel’s Sauce,” the original version of the Double Down contains 540 calories and 32 grams of fat. By comparison, the grilled version has 460 calories and 23 grams of fat.

  • The menu for 22 residents of Lancaster Children’s Home on Wednesday morning was typical breakfast fare; bacon, ham, eggs, grits and toast.

    But toasting milk in stemware set on tables adorned with fresh flowers, burning candles, name cards?

    That’s not a common sight.

    But it was a sight to stem some table manner confusion, said Annette Deese, Children’s Home director.

    See Lancaster SC’s Peggy Little, with a little help, schooled the group, ages 8 to 17, in former dinner etiquette.

  • Anything is possible.

    In the late 1980s, few people outside the Columbia music scene knew who Mark Bryan, Dean Felber, Darius Rucker and Jim Sonefeld were.

    All of that changed in 1994 when the four, collectively known as Hootie & the Blowfish, released “Cracked Rear View.”

    That musical breakthrough was characterized by the national media as “instant success.”

    But musician and University of South Carolina graduate David Reed knows there is no such thing. It takes more than talent.

  • The July 4 holiday is summer entertaining at its best.

    We pack the picnic basket and head out to relax with family and friends or light the grill and invite them over for an Independence Day celebration.

    Given that, we don’t want to stay in the kitchen with the oven turned on any longer than we have to. And if we are outside, we want something that’s going to be refreshing and cool.

    With abundant sunshine and high temperatures forecast near 90 degrees in the extended forecast on Saturday and Sunday, cool, shady spots are going to be in demand.