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Features

  • When Evelyn Springs announced in August that the Autism Speaks fundraiser, Lancaster Cooks 2010 – Look Who’s Cooking, had been postponed, she vowed not to sit on her laurels.

    The feisty, take-no-for-an-answer-grandmother is proving to be good to her word.

    Springs – who continues to fight autism – the disease that is effects the daily life of her 8-year-old grandson, Mailk, is now casting her bread upon the waters with a fishing net.

  • Evelyn Springs continues to fight to find a cure for the autism that has robbed her grandson, Malik, 8, of a normal childhood.

    But for now, that fight has been put on hold.

    No, Springs isn’t a quitter, but the annual fundraiser she hosts for Autism Speaks has been postponed.

    Although letters and invitations for Lancaster Cooks 2010 – Look Who’s Cooking have been mailed out, the plans have been temporarily shelved.

    The popular fundraiser was scheduled for 6:30 p.m. Sept. 28 at the Fairway Room.

  • Three authors who share a common thread that weaves through Lancaster County have recently published books.

    The Rev. Jesse Adams became an author quite unexpectedly.

    Harriett Hodges Diller became an accomplished author years ago and continues to write.

    Malcolm Jones has made a very successful living reviewing books and is now writing his own.

    Here are their stories.

    Adams a reluctant writer

    The Rev. Jessie Adams never imagined he would one day be an author. 

    “I don’t even like to write,” he said.

  • One-handed grabs don’t just apply to the action on the football field. They also apply to the food in the parking lot, before and after the game.

    It’s time to get out the awning, folding table, chairs, coolers, grill and the cornhole game.

    Tailgating – the football season social hour – is finally here.

    It’s hard to beat a day with family and friends at a college or pro football stadium to celebrate a love of the game and to root on your favorite team.

  • Ninety-year-old Sarah Crockett hasn’t lost her zeal for life.

    The great-great-grandmother hasn’t lost her zeal for the camp meeting at Mount Carmel AME Zion Church, either.

    The wagons and buggies Crockett recalls seeing when she came to camp meeting for the first time in 1932, as a 12 year old, are gone. They’ve been replaced by motor homes.

    “Back then, very few people had cars,” she said.

  • Family Promise and local law enforcement are about to get a dose of “Monkey Madness” from Girl Scouts Nicole Hudson and Michaella Oswald.

    The two 14 year olds, members of Girl Scout Troop 3671, have  launched a pajama and stuffed toy drive drive to benefit both as a community service project for their Girl Scout Silver Awards.

    The Girl Scout Silver award is the second highest award Girl Scouts can earn.

  • September and October are the best months to plant cool-season grasses.

    “Labor Day is the time to really start thinking about getting that fall seed out there,” said Brian Beer, Clemson University Cooperative Extension Service agent for Lancaster County.

    But before you get out the seed broadcaster and unroll the garden hose, there’s a little homework to do.

    And this assignment goes a long way in stretching your dollar as well as protecting both time and money.

  • The sun is sinking in the sky a little earlier each evening.

    We’re losing a couple of minutes of daylight each day as autumn draws closer.

    The hot, hazy days of summer are winding down, too, with daily temperatures decreasing.

    It’s a sure sign that Labor Day, college football and fall are on the way.

    Labor Day weekend marks the official end of summer.

    The focus of Labor Day should always be on relaxing.

    That was Congress’ full intention in June 1894 when it enacted the federal holiday.

  • KERSHAW – " Thirteen-year-old Amber Vinson likes math and is pretty good at it.

    The Andrew Jackson Middle School student’s report card is always full of A’s and B’s in every course.

    But math isn’t the only course this eighth grader is getting good at.

    And just like her report card is proof positive of her work in the classroom, those pink and black Ferrini Stingray Tiger Western boots she wears to school each day show that Amber is getting pretty good at ripping through the barrels, too.

  • Ann Robertson made a decision years ago.  After recovering from a stroke and later being diagnosed with fibromyalgia, her doctor told her that her future was in her own hands. 

    She learned that while the fibromyalgia would be painful, she could choose to be active and deal with the pain or let the pain control her.

    She chose to be active. Part of her active lifestyle includes planning and maintaining one of the prettiest yards in Lancaster.

  • American food has always been a melting pot. While that’s true in every region of the country, it’s especially true in Hawaii.

    Its cuisine is a kaleidescope of tastes that came about from ethnic groups that immigrated there.

    A fusion of cultures – American, Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, Korean, Polynesian and Portuguese – come together on the island state.

    Many of those immigrants imported plant and food sources with them when they relocated to the volcanic island.

  • For years, I’ve heard cooking experts extol the virtues of using fresh herbs to transform ordinary meals into extraordinary meals.

    That kind of talk got my attention.

    But instead of picking fresh herbs at the grocery store, I decided to grow my own.

    Guess what? They were right.

    I have become a planter box cook, with basil, rosemary and thyme growing right outside our back door.

    They not only boost flavor, they also allow you to cut back on salt, fat and sugar to allow for a cleaner taste.

  • The Band of Oz will kick up plenty of shaggin’ sand at 7:30 p.m. Saturday as the opening act for the 2010-11 See Lancaster SC Performing Arts Series.

    One of the biggest acts in beach music history, the Band of Oz was formed in1967 by friends who played together in the Rose High School Stage Band (Greenville, N.C.).

    At the time, their only goal was to make a little money as a part-time band playing frat parties and high school proms.

    However, their non-stop, fan-friendly stage shows and tight, horn section sound soon drew the attention of record labels.

  • It happens on Saturday mornings from April through late October.

    A gung-ho, do-it-yourselfer steps outside, breathes deeply and heads to the shed to get out the mower.

    He checks the fluids, adjusts the throttle and either pulls the crank cord or turns the ignition switch.

    Nothing happens.

    Then, he wastes half the day trying to get the mower started. And if it doesn’t, he loads up the mower to take it to a repair shop on Monday.

  • Diana Knight doesn’t take America’s favorite pastime for granted.

    Running the bases matters, but then again, so do jump balls, 4-6-7-10 splits, and cheering for those who do.

    The problem is not everyone is on equal footing when it comes to game-winning hits, bowling strikes, free throws and pom-poms.

    But thanks to the Dream Team, the odds of disabled young people in Lancaster from ages 6 to 21 being enjoying those simple things on equal footing have greatly improved.

  • The hardest part of getting ready for the first day of school on Monday?

    No, it’s not deciding what to wear.

    The real challenge is coming up with school lunch ideas that are fresh, nutritious and fun. That way, the lunch box isn’t full when they come home Monday afternoon.

    Livening up a school lunch box so that its contents don’t end up in the trash isn’t that hard, according to Clemson University’s Janis Hunter and Katherine Cason.

  • Growing up, Jeff Whisnant always figured he’d drive an 18-wheeler for a living.

    But sometimes childhood plans don’t quite work out. Only part of that one did.

    “I just drive a bus, instead,” he said.

    When that bus crosses the state line into Lancaster County today, he will be behind the wheel. His wife, Susan, and their sons, Austin, 16, and Ethan, 13, will be on it, along with Aaron Hise and Eric Ollis.

    That bus has become a way of life for the Whisnants, one of the leading trios in Southern gospel music.

  • The women of Eastside Baptist Church are taking a leap of faith. 

    For the first time ever, they will be hosting a women’s conference, presented by New Desire Christian Ministries, on Friday and Saturday.

    New Desire Christian Ministries is a nondenominational ministry founded on the truths taught in God’s Word. It is led by Brenda Robinson and her evangelist husband, Dan.

  •  

    Want to help?

    WHAT: A benefit Southern gospel music singing for Jerry Scott, featuring the Good News Trio and King’s Cause

    WHEN: 7 p.m. Aug. 14

    WHERE: Kershaw Second Baptist Church, 7737 Kershaw Camden Highway

    HOW MUCH: Free, with 100 percent of a love offering going to defray Scott’s medical expenses

  • On July 25-31, the members of Second Baptist Church put their faith in action through The Way, an initiative that focuses on the needs of others.

    There was an array of mission-themed activities to choose from, ranging from washing cars to health care and reaching out to bikers.

    “We go out to mow a lawn, but that’s not the ultimate goal,” said Larry Helm, who oversees pastoral care at Second Baptist Church. “The purpose of The Way is sharing God’s love.”