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Features

  • In the upcoming year, the Lancaster County District of the Boy Scouts of America will be under construction to revamp its volunteer support base from the ground up, said local Boy Scout executive Art Harris.
    “It’s been around 100 years and has contributed a lot of leadership to Lancaster in that time and we want that to continue,” Harris said.
    Harris said the great thing about scouting is everyone gets to play, regardless of skill level.

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    The day before Thanksgiving is a day Ruddy and Linda Shipton will never forget. They lost their home and three of their beloved dogs to a ferocious fire. 

  • What Denver Bierman stands for is not as important as the rock he stands on.
    A diehard Hoosier who now makes his home in Hendersonville, Tenn., Bierman doesn’t keep his light under a basket. He and his merry band of musicians let it shine for everyone to see.
    The 33-year-old trumpet player/singer/band leader of the Denver and the Mile High Orchestra (DMHO) will fill the Bundy Auditorium at the University of South Carolina on Friday with a high-energy holiday big band sound that is timeless, cutting edge and spiritual.

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       The sun was rising over the eastern horizon and daylight was burning. It was almost picture show time at the Imperial Theater on Main Street and the coins in my pocket were about to burn a hole in my britches.

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    Each month, the Lancaster Council of Garden Clubs designates a yard in Lancaster County as the Yard of the Month. Irony plays a huge role in the selection this month.  

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  • Family Features

    The holidays are supposed to be filled with love and good cheer, but the logistics of shopping for gifts, sending out cards, taking family trips and shipping packages can leave even the jolliest of people in a Scrooge-like mood. 

     

    Fortunately, there are some ways you can take the hassle out of the holidays and make them a little brighter for yourself and those around you. 

  • The life and times of Lallage Jones read like a great short story.
    And now, that’s just what it is.
    Her story, “Highlights of My Life,” is now a permanent part of the Peggy Howell-Heath Archive Room at First United Methodist Church.
    Jones was also recently recognized by the city of Lancaster for her contributions.
    A talented artist, Jones taught math at South Junior (now Middle) School for 13 years.
    Mayor Joe Shaw said Jones has become an example for others to follow.

  • Spend an evening in the 18th-century. Come see for yourself what life was like for early settlers living in the Waxhaws.
    See how the American Revolution affected this region.
    Experience life in this area during Andrew Jackson’s time and watch the events that shaped the community as you step back in time.
    Watch as costumed volunteers bring the events to life and demonstrate the skills it took to survive in this backcountry settlement.
    Join the Friends of Andrew Jackson State Park on Saturday for its annual Life in the Waxhaws Lantern Tour.

  • Dr. John Griffin, distinguished professor emeritus at the University of South Carolina, has written on a variety of topics ranging from college football rivalries to World War II heroes and presidents.
    He even found time to pen a murder mystery.
    But Griffin considers his latest book, which will be released at Lancaster County Library on Thursday, among the most important to date.
    The title is a dead giveaway as why Griffin chose Veterans Day to unveil the work.

  • INDIAN LAND – Jack Shumaker was never one to shirk duty, even when it made little sense.
    The Bluefield, W.Va., native had seen a lot since joining the 26th Infantry division attached to Gen. George S. Patton’s 3rd Army.
    But sweeping off an almost clean air base runway that December day in 1944 made little sense. Still, orders are orders and obeying them is what soldiers do. So that’s what Shumaker and about 300 more soldiers did, to the best of their ability.
    “That booger looked like it was about 2 miles long,” he said.  

  • If my daughter, Betty Jo, goes trick-or-treating on Saturday, her first stop will be the homes along Buford Circle, where homeowners like Robert Sistare and Diane Gaskin will greet them with sweet treats of every size and flavor.

  • The Lancaster Chapter of the United Daughters of Confederacy has presented a 12-volume set of “Recollections and Reminiscences 1861-1865 through World War I,” to the Del Webb Library in Indian Land.
    The 12-volume set was compiled by the UDC from diaries, journals, newspaper articles dating as far back as 1896 and personal interviews of South Carolina soldiers and their family members. They were published in 1986 as an educational resource.

  • The dirt road that crosses the small pond dam at Jim Mahaffey’s Used Cars and Parts looks like the perfect setting for a scary movie.
    Covered in a thick canopy of pine trees, very little sunlight penetrates to the red clay.
    Narrow and winding with slanted shoulders on both sides just wide enough for a wagon, it isn’t very much of a road.
    Crossing it by the light of day is no cup of tea, so just imagine how frightening it can be during a moonlight hayride.

  • Louis Fenchel joined the Worthington (Ky.) Volunteer Fire Department at the age of 16. That’s a little too young to become a firefighter. And the fire department had to bend its age requirement to accommodate. But there were some other factors.
    “This was in 1965. Vietnam was in full swing and there were few able-bodied men left in the area,” Fenchel said.

  • “An Enchanted Evening: The Music of Broadway,” a delightful evening of music spanning six decades of stage shows will be in Lancaster this week.
    This concert is 7:30 p.m. Friday at the University of South Carolina at Lancaster’s Bundy Auditorium. Tickets are $45 each.

  • Back by popular demand, the Atlanta Sacred Chorale (ASC) is returning to Lancaster.
    The nationally known chorale will present its 2010-11 program, Awake the Dawn, at 2:30 p.m. Sunday at First United Methodist Church, 200 W. Gay St.
    The concert is the 14th of the Vivian Major Robinson concert series, sponsored by the Lancaster County Council of the Arts. Concert admission is free, thanks to endowment funding.
    The 40-plus members of the chamber choir, directed by Dr. Eric Nelson, are a mixture of professional and amateur musicians.

  • From Day One, Michael Pardue’s life has been tough.

    He was born with cystic fibrosis, an inherited chronic terminal disease that affects the lungs and digestive system of about 30,000 people in the United States.

    But after struggling with just catching his breath for 24 years, the son of Joey Pardue and Len and Judy Robinson is now breathing a little easier.

    Michael underwent a double lung transplant during eight hours of surgery at the University of North Carolina Hospitals in Chapel Hill on Oct. 1.

  • KERSHAW – Ryan Phillips and Luke Pittman never got the sub sandwiches they were promised on Nov. 1, 2009, when they agreed to ride over into Kershaw County with Luke’s mom, Kelly Pittman, to pick up his younger sister, Grace, who was baby-sitting.

    Kelly’s sandwich bribe was pretty much forgotten about. But what the two boys – Life Scouts in Boy Scout Troop 74 – did that night hasn’t.