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Features

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    It’s  4 p.m. on a Friday. South York Street is nearly empty. A few people walking and a handful of cars at a poolroom.   About the only traffic is a few cars headed north toward town or south to make connections at busy intersections.

    It’s always been South York Street, but not so very long ago, nearly everyone living here had a different name for a short strip of it: “Midway.” 

  • INDIAN LAND – Frances Flock has no idea whether her favorite sweater vest is subliminal, symbolic or cryptic.

    But there is a story behind the rhesus monkeys embroidered on it.

    That monkey vest pays tribute to Jocko Flocko, NASCAR’s simian race driver extraordinaire and the co-pilot who made her husband, the late Tim Flock, a household hit in the early 1950s.

    “All the kids wanted to see the monkey,” she said.

  • Sunday is National Cherry Pie Day.                                  
    Now, if you didn’t know that, don’t feel bad. Saturday is National Chocolate Mint Day, and I didn’t know about that one, either.
    No one is sure how Feb. 20 got to be National Cherry Pie Day.

  • Jody Miles is back. And so is that sense of humor and smile God gave her.
    Miles, 57, grins every time she reads Jeremiah 29:11 and she is grinning more each day as she recovers from a liver transplant.
    That verse of Scripture has been a big comfort for the co-founder of Christian Services in the last two years.
    Miles has all but forgotten the numerous setbacks from esophageal surgery and a cat bite in July that punted her from the top of the liver transplant list at the Medical University of South Carolina.

  • Wildfire season in South Carolina normally starts in late winter and early spring.
    Given the weather conditions, officials here are keeping a close eye on things, especially after a 15-acre pasture off Pardue Road burned Wednesday about 1 p.m.
    Firefighters from Shiloh-Zion and Camp Creek volunteer fire departments, Lancaster County Fire Service and a S.C. Forestry Commission plow worked for about two hours to bring the blaze under control.

  • Having a police cruiser pull into the driveway at 3 a.m. and hearing the car door slam shut is unexpected, to say the least.

    But not for 78-year-old Sarah Kirkland. She’s grown used to it.

    As soon as “Ms. Sarah” heard the officer knock on the door of her Cedar Run Road home in the Pleasant Hill community, the kitchen lights were on and the bath water was running.

    That’s because there was a special love in her house that could meet a special need.

  • For many of us, balancing family, family life and career responsibilities, can be a high wire act.
    Sometimes, I wonder how we get everything done that has to be.
    Take Tuesday, for example. I was at Shiloh Unity ARP Church at 6 p.m. for an upcoming work-related article, and my wife, Jo, had to leave for her job at Springs Memorial Hospital about that same time.
    Before the night was up, our daughter, Betty Jo, had a basketball game.

  • Your hard-working vehicle needs attention during cold weather, too. Below-freezing temperatures can especially take a toil on rubber and plastic parts, causing them to fail and break. Here are some basic maintenance tips to keep your car running in tip-top shape after last week’s snowstorm:

  • Moisture problems occur inside a home whenever there is an imbalance between the amount entering and exiting it and the structure’s capacity to store that moisture.
    Moisture is generated through cooking, bathing, watering indoor plants, using unvented space heaters and washing clothes.
    If this happens on a cold window pane, you will see the water run down and collect on the window sill, where it may damage the paint or rot the wood trim.
    The water may even freeze, producing frost on the inside surface of the window.

  • Moisture problems occur inside a home whenever there is an imbalance between the amount entering and exiting it and the structure’s capacity to store that moisture.
    Moisture is generated through cooking, bathing, watering indoor plants, using unvented space heaters and washing clothes.
    If this happens on a cold window pane, you will see the water run down and collect on the window sill, where it may damage the paint or rot the wood trim.
    The water may even freeze, producing frost on the inside surface of the window.

  • At one time, soup was just considered part of a meal.

    These days, thanks to busy lifestyles and ultra-tight budgets, one-pot cooking has become popular and economical.

    While canned soup requires little effort to prepare, it doesn’t compare to the homemade variety.

    A few flavor-filled ingredients, when combined with chicken or beef stock and the right amount of seasoning, will create a tasty pot of the good stuff.

    It requires a little more work, but making soup is one case where the result is worth the effort.

  • • Soups and stews always taste better if made a day or two in advance and reheated just before serving. You can also reduce the fat content by making soup the day before, chilling it and then scraping off the fat that rises to the top. If you don’t have time to chill the soup, use qcpaper towel to soak up oil from the surface.

    • Use fresh ingredients if possible – Fresh ingredients are best, but some canned or frozen vegetables, such as peas, green beans and corn, will work.

  • For Chase Gordon, 2011 is shaping up to be a better year than 2010.

    After undergoing surgery for cancer in 2009, the 4 year old celebrated New Year’s Day at Disney World with his parents, David and Nicole, and brothers Cody, 7, and Braxton, 5, courtesy of the Make-A-Wish Foundation.

    For his parents, the vacation was an early wedding anniversary present. The Gordons were married Jan. 16, 2005.

    The Gordons were in Orlando from Dec. 29 to Jan. 4.

  • This week's winter storm shut down most of Lancaster County. Here is a little look at what your neighbors have been up to.

  • On cold winter days when the mercury hovers around the freezing mark, it’s hard to top a warm meal to break the chill.
    When a slow cooker does all the work, a hearty, satisfying and wholesome family dinner doesn’t require tons of work.
    Once the ingredients are in place, it’s as simple as closing the lid and walking away.
    A green salad and some fresh bread and something from the slow cooker has all the makings of a great meal.  

  • Gregory A. Summers
    gsummers@thelancasternews.com
    In the early 1950s, an up and coming featherweight boxer who idolized Joe Louis was walking back to the locker room inside Detroit’s Woodward Avenue Gym locker room after a rigorous workout.
    The Korean War veteran said a poster advertising a battle of the bands between Duke Ellington and Stan Kenton grabbed his attention.
    It was hanging above the poster of an upcoming boxing match. The two posters stopped him in his tracks and changed his life.

  • Omileye Achikeobi Lewis
    How do you get children to enjoy learning?
    You slip them factoids while they are eating or playing. At some point, it might hit them that they actually learned something new and interesting. This is what happened to the children of Lancaster who attended the third annual Humanity4Water Award ceremony, “Island Earth Party for Our Children.”

  • Most Americans consider green tea as a beverage.
    However, in Asian cuisine, green tea is used in common recipes.
    For centuries the Chinese have used tea leaves as an stuffing ingredient  for steamed fish, said Diana Rosen, author of “Cooking with Tea.”
    It was added to fires to enhance the flavor of smoking ducks and to give hard boiled eggs  a little eye appeal.

  • In 2010, The Lancaster News published 164 issues. That’s a lot of your stories to tell.
    We said hello to Zantwan Adams, the county’s first baby, born Jan. 2.
    We lost Dr. Bill Duke, school board member Dr. Peter Barry, longtime business owner J.L. Knight, “Aunt Jo” Williams, former county councilman Gene Hudson, the Rev. N.J. Neely and countless others who made a difference.
    In looking back, choosing the top feature stories for the year was quite a task.

  • In celebration of the holiday season, the homes of Lancaster are decorated with ribbons, lights, and greenery inside and out.   
    For this reason, the December Yard of the Month is not only selected for landscape design but also for the festive decorations that enhance it.
    With this in mind, the Lancaster Council of Garden Clubs selected the home of Rick and Dean DuRant, 1405 Somerset Drive.
    “This is a charming brick home. The holiday decorations work beautifully from day into night,” said Joyce Morin of the Lancaster Garden Club.