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Features

  • FORT LAWN – In 1996, third-generation farmers David and Jimmy Jordan were looking for a crop that could be watered and didn’t require very much rain.
    Their options were limited, given their location just north of Fort Lawn on S.C. 21. That was something the Jordan boys learned young, while watching their grandfather try to scratch out a cotton crop on the same ground.
    “We’d sit on the porch and watch thunderstorms come through and go around this place every single time, making our granddaddy so mad he could spit,” David Jordan said.

  • Bless Pete, I’m suffering from Osama bin Laden overload.

    It’s kinda like having to unfasten your britches due to that last piece of pie you just had to have.

    Right now, I’ve had my fill when it comes to reading, watching, hearing and talking about the demise of Osama bin Laden.

    Now, the very first reports about him sure seemed like the kind of heroic story old veterans like me yearn for. 

    The Twin Towers mastermind was finished off in a way that befit his own lifestyle (see Matthew 26:52). 

  • The newly restored historic Lancaster Courthouse is getting a face-lift of another kind outside. 

    The Lancaster Council of Garden Clubs (LCGC) is coordinating an ongoing project to plant and maintain a flower garden at the courthouse’s rear entrance, which faces the Catawba Street courtyard. 

    This is no ordinary flower garden. The garden will showcase local and state plants, as well as provide a habitat for birds and butterflies. The garden will also include historic components to provide a community learning experience. 

  • If you live in the country, you may be hearing a noise right now you just can’t explain.
    That’s not some huge industrial machine humming miles away and it’s not your imagination gone wild. There’s nothing wrong with your hearing.
    It’s the return of the 13-year cicadas, which have re-emerged from underground to mate.   
    Jane Massey of Van Wyck has already seen more than her share of these fearful-looking, red-eyed insects flitting about.

  • The amount raised locally for Relay for Life changes from year to year, but one thing will never change, said Kimberly Collins, community manager for the American Cancer Society.

    “Lancaster County is known for its passion for Relay,” Collins said. 

    That passion was there for everyone to see as 76 teams raised more than $170,000 this year.

    The 2011 Relay for Life culminated with the annual walk at the University of South Carolina Lancaster on Friday, which drew a crowd estimated at more than 9,000.

  • Chef and cookbook author Nancy Hughes’ Tomato Basil Soup with Chicken is a bowl of comfort at its best.

    “Everybody loves soup, but it takes a long time and cooks away all the nutrients,” said Hughes, author of “15-Minute Diabetic Meals.”   

    Hughes said the soup takes “15 minutes flat” to prepare.

    The key is to make sure to drain the navy beans and to rinse them twice to get rid of the cloudiness and gunk.

  • – Editor’s note: W.B. Evans is on vacation this week. Due to reader requests, we are reprinting this Remember When column, which was originally published in the May 13, 2007, edition of The Lancaster News. “Mamas cannot be replaced, but our memories help keep them alive,” Evans said. “I’m getting mushy, but somehow I feels that she knows I still care, at least, if The Lancaster News is on the newsstands in heaven!”  

  • Gregory A. Summers
    gsummers@thelancasternews.com
    KERSHAW – Preacher Kenny “Cotton” Pate has an unusual way of explaining what’s going on whenever tears of joy flow down his face and into his ZZ Top-looking beard.
    “I always tell my folks that’s the good Lord washing the nasty out of me,” Cotton said.
    Cotton’s words may be somewhat unusual, but he isn’t your typical preacher.

  • From the outside, French toast – bread soaked in an egg batter and cooked golden brown in a skillet or on a griddle – appears to be a hearty breakfast treat fit for a king.
    According to promotional literature by the International House of Pancakes (IHOP),  the first written mention of this delicacy dates to Henry V of England.
    However, nothing could be farther from the truth. It was created as a way to rescue stale bread so nothing went to waste.

  • Name: Amanda Carnes
    Age: 31
    Address: Providence Road
    Family: Husband, Brad, 31, and two daughters, Olivia, 4, and Lauren, 2  
    Pets: Two labs, Grace and Spirit
    Job: Director of Christian Education at Pleasant Hill United Methodist Church
    Hobbies: Reading, walking and spending time with my family
    Favorite book: The Bible

  • Editor’s note – Each Friday in April, The Lancaster News is publishing the winning essays from “The Veteran in Your Life” essay contest sponsored by the Lancaster County Veterans Affairs Office as part of National County Government Month. The theme is “Serving Our Veterans, Armed Forces and Their Families.” Four winners (elementary school, middle school, high school and grand prize) will be selected and announced.

    Ron Wiseman


  • Forty-five years in the making, Vivian Ferguson’s yard at 601 Laurel Court is a  sight to behold.
    After careful planning and lots of tender loving care, her yard is now a true showplace filled with a wide variety of perennials, trees and shrubs that offer colorful blooms year round.
    If you’ve driven along Woodland Drive near Lancaster High School, you’ve probably noticed it, especially in the spring.  

  • With family-packages and buying in bulk the norm, cooking for one or two people can be an exercise in futility.
    Most recipes are written for families of four or for six to eight people.
    That’s especially true of dinner recipes, said Joe Yonan, author of “Serve Yourself: Nightly Adventures in Cooking for One.”

  • Not everyone who enjoys gardening gets a flower named after them, but it’s happened to Betsy Steele
    Bob Roycroft, a Georgetown day lily (hemerocallis) hybridizer, has  introduced “Betsy’s Delight” to honor of Steele, president of the Garden Club of South Carolina (GCSC).
    The parent plant of “Betsy’s Delight” is “Lady of Class,” which fits Steele’s gracious, thoughtful and encouraging demeanor. The flower certainly caught on and is currently sold out.

  • On Monday, the President and First Lady will send out the Secret Service to round up children in Virginia and Maryland, give them a colored basket and a free pass to wallow in the grass on the South Lawn of America’s back yard for the 133rd annual White House Easter Egg Roll.
    Given the political correctness of the times, I’m kinda surprised they haven’t changed the name to the “Spring Spheres Rotation.”

  • Name: Les Weeks
    Age: 40
    Address: Hilton Way Road
    Family: Wife, Tammy, 28; three children, Anna, 12, Dillon, 5, and Noah, 3  
    Pets: A dog, Mooch
    Job: Lancaster County tax collector
    Church: The Church of the Good Shepherd United Methodist Church
    Hobbies: Spending time with our children and helping with household chores

  • The Loving Group was awarded the Grand Specialty Art Award for their landscape design showcase at the Southern Spring Home and Garden Show held March 2-6 at the Park Expo and Conference Center in Charlotte.
    The award is presented to the showcase garden that implements the most outstanding art and graphic element.
    Twenty-six landscape designers participated in the design competition, entitled “A Novel Idea.” Participants were instructed to interpret a novel via landscape design.  

  • Nothing really changes the taste of grits, said Mark Benson as “John Lennon” during the 1964 the Tribute concert inside a raucous Bundy Auditorium at the University of South Carolina at Lancaster.
    Nothing really changes the Beatles, either, as the tribute band proved while rocking the house Saturday.
    If imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, The Beatles would be flattered by    Ricky Vacca (Paul), Tom Work (George), Bobby Potter (Ringo) and Mark Benson (John), said Kim Burgess.

  • You know, I gotta hand it to my neighbors who participate in our local crime watch programs.
    They don’t expect medals or fame. They enjoy the self-satisfaction of looking out for their neighbors and reducing crime.
    There was a time I was a dedicated crime watcher, or a least, tried to be.
    World War II had been going on almost a year. All of us were tryin’ to do our part, which meant rationing was an everyday thing.

  • Name: Colleen Estridge
    Age: 59
    Address: Flat Creek Road
    Family: Husband, the late Ferris Estridge; two children, Johnny Morrow and Lynn Morrow; two grandchildren and one great-grandchild  
    Job: Unemployed; I was the home health caregiver for my husband for three years
    Church: Baptist faith
    Hobbies: Gardening/flowers
    Favorite movie: “Gone with the Wind”