.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Features

  • Name: Maria Campos
    Age: 30
    Address: Holly Dale Drive
    Family: Husband, Hugo Campos, and a daughter, Mabelyn Campos  
    Job: Volunteer for ESL (English as a Second Language)
    Church: St. Catherine Catholic Church
    Hobbies: Reading and watching movies
    Favorite movie: “The Notebook”
    Favorite book: The Bible
    Favorite food: Mexican food

  • Nine years ago, when Ronnie and Crystal Carnes bought their home at 1228 Kent Drive, the contractor made them an offer they couldn’t refuse. The price of the new home was reduced if they agreed to do all the landscaping themselves.  

    Having a special knack for landscaping, Ronnie welcomed and accepted the deal.   

    Now, by reading do-it-yourself magazines, driving through neighborhoods and picking up a few tips from previous Yard of the Month recipients, he has created quite a showplace at their home. 

  • They have a wholesalers license and their product is certified as a South Carolina product. In fact, Barbara Lyles and Barbara Hilton even have a certificate from the Department of Homeland Security.

    “We are certified as not being terrorists,” Lyles said.

    Their product is made in South Carolina and they are licensed to sell. Homeland Security might want to rethink their designation, though, because the cheesecakes Lyles and Hilton make in their small business are definitely “the bomb.”

  • According to the Hearth, Patio and Barbecue’s 2011 National Barbecue Poll, 70 percent of Americans prefer to cook out over eating out as a way to save money.

    If dad enjoys cooking out, firing up the grill for Father’s Day is a natural, low cost fit. It can be fun, easy and a stress-free way to avoid long restaurant lines.

    Instead of a gift card, new tie, socks or shirt, why not make your dad feel like a king with a great Father’s Day meal that will put a smile on his face?

  • Boy, I sure am feeling much safer.  For a few dollars each month I can now protect myself from identity loss.

    Somebody wanting to be me... imagine that. 

    According to the television commercials, somebody out there is just waiting to swipe my credit card and charge thousands of dollars to it. 

    To tell the truth, with my credit score, that would be a real feat, if you get my drift.

    You know, all this identification stuff is sorta hard to grasp.

  • FORT LAWN – Time sure flies. 

    In 1953, Robert “Bobby” Edwards went to work part time for his uncle, Pleas Baker, at Catawba Fish Camp on S.C. 9, after serving a hitch in the U.S. Army as a mess sergeant. He was 24 years old.

    Then in 1968, when Baker retired, Edwards quit a good job at the Rock Hill Bleachery after 23 years and took over the fish camp full time. Edwards was told by a bleachery supervisor that he was making a mistake.   

  • In the late 1700s, there were no neighborhood grocery stores for food or seasonings or pharmacies for medicines in the Waxhaws.

    Self-sufficiency was a critical element of survival for the Scots-Irish settlers who were carving a way of life out of the wilderness.

    That meant most families had a kitchen garden close to the house, where vegetables, fruit and herbs were grown. 

  • When it comes to grilling out, nothing beats hot dogs and hamburgers, but sometimes you need to kick it up a notch.

    That’s where a good marinade comes in.

    Marinades are a great way to add spice and flavor before grilling. 

    You can also make the most of an inexpensive cut of meat with a marinade by turning cheap choice into prime steak.

    There are tons of store-bought varieties, but you can save money by easily preparing your own from scratch.

  • The city of Lancaster’s summer outdoor movie and concert series kicks off this week.

    Caroline Hasty, events and promotions manager for the city of Lancaster, said there will be a movie on the second Saturday of each month through September.

    Beginning Saturday, Hasty said families can bring chairs and blankets to the corner of Gay and Main streets for “Movies in the City.”

    All the movies are free and concessions will be sold.

  •  American history was recently on display in the form of a green antique railroad car. 

    Her name is the Pullman Sunbeam, and she had been under wraps the last few years at the L&C Railway headquarters on South Main Street in Lancaster. 

    A Vermont museum asked Bob Willetts if he and others at the railway would take on the task of restoring the Sunbeam to its original form of more than 100 years ago. 

    Willetts agreed and now three years later, they talk proudly about a project that is just about complete. 

  • Metro Services

    Men and women anticipate the arrival of warmer weather in the same way children look forward to Christmas morning. 

    With a snowier-than-usual winter and chilly start to the spring in many regions, summertime sun and heat might be more coveted than ever before.

    While many individuals have been counting down the days until 85-degree weather, pets may not have been sharing the same enthusiasm. 

    The hot weather can bring discomfort to our four-legged friends.

  • By Julie Graham

    For The Lancaster News

    A small wooden playhouse for tea parties, dress up and all things make-believe owned by the Duke family of Lancaster has come to life again to entertain its fourth generation.

    John and Beverly Duke have the playhouse in the backyard of their Meadow Drive home for the next generation, their granddaughter, Railee Brown, who turns two in July. 

    During its nearly 70 years in the Duke family, it has been moved and repainted four times.  

  • A couple of Indian Land High School students can add their names to the school’s list of signed athletes this year after receiving word from the University of South Carolina in Columbia that they have made the team.

    Only this time the team isn’t on the gridiron or court, it’s on the sidelines.

    Seniors Alexis Barjona and Megan Leskody were among more than 120 cheerleaders from across the state to try out for coveted spots on the Gamecocks’ two cheerleading squads and were among the  54 who made it. 

  • High school graduation ceremonies, Memorial Day weekend and NASCAR racing in Charlotte usher in the unofficial kick-off to summer.

    There is no better way to celebrate than with a cookout.

    But before striking a match, there are a few pre-grilling items to take care of so a meal doesn’t end up burned to a crisp.

  • Iron man Cal Ripkin Jr. isn’t the only one with an unforgettable number. The baseball hall of famer played in 2,632 consecutive games.
    Two county students have their own streaks within their respective school hallways.
    For 12 years, Andrew Jackson High School’s Jordan Truesdale and Buford High School’s Lauren Bradburn managed to make it out of bed every day and go to class. That equals to 2,160 consecutive school days for each of them.
    Neither of them have missed a day of school since the first grade.   

  • A couple of weeks after Sears and Roebuck sent back Aunt Bessie’s check for  my J.C. Higgins Roadmaster, stuff was changing in a hurry.
    One of ‘em was my opinion of President Roosevelt. I thought he had made a big mistake. I just couldn’t figure out how one bicycle could contribute so mightily to the war effort.
    Mama was reading the morning paper about how tires, gasoline, sugar, electric ice boxes, Hershey Bars, and shoes, among other things would be in short supply for the home folks.

  • Name: Blake Finley
    Age: 14
    Address: Camp Creek Road
    Family: Parents, Todd and Renee Finley; a sister, Madison, 19  
    Pets: A dachshund, Tanner
    Job: Student
    Church: Zion United Methodist Church
    Hobbies: Playing the guitar
    Favorite books: The Bible and “To Kill a Mockingbird”
    Favorite movie: “The Blindside”

  • Growing up, Stuart Graham attended Van Wyck Presbyterian Church with his family.  
    Just two doors down from there stood a bright yellow home known throughout the tight knit community as the old Hyatt house.  
    At the time, Graham never realized the keys to the 1898 Victorian-style home at 5154 Old Hickory Road would one day be in his pocket.
    Graham had always admired the house and was excited to learn in 2003 it was to be sold at an auction.

  • Opinions and advice on how to achieve good health or overcome health problems are a “dime-a-dozen” nearly everywhere.
    But it means a lot more to hear a personal story from someone you know, who’s succeeded in achieving better health.
    It’s even better if their program is simple, easy to understand and affordable.
    Konstantinos “Gus” Deligiannidis, owner of Gus’ Restaurants in Kershaw and Lancaster, has a story of his own journey to good health, and he’s doing something to share it.