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Features

  • Within the next couple of months, Robert Truesdale’s “office” will be empty.

    That office is the seed counter in Ace Hardware and Garden Center of Lancaster, where Truesdale has weighed out seed of every kind and shape in the last 54 years. Truesdale, now a part time “feed and seed store” employee, will soon weigh out his last bag for one of the farmers who stop by to trade hearty stories and conversation.

    That’s because Lancaster is losing one of its oldest businesses. 

  • Name: Trish Hinson

    Age: 42

    Address: Hula Drive

    Family: Husband, Joel, 45, and a daughter, Katie Hope Hinson, 17  

    Pets: Zoe, a dapple dachshund, and four treeing walker hounds

    Job: Lancaster County 911 addressing 

    Church: Rich Hill Baptist Church

  • Mosquitoes have been around for thousands, maybe millions, of years.

    And these winged blood suckers have no intention of taking off this summer.

    With the pop-up thunderstorm season now in full swing, it doesn’t take much to create a mosquito nuisance, said Sue Ferguson, an environmental health manager for S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control.

    That’s where a little routine yard sprucing-up comes in.

  • There’s nothing like the smell of fresh, homegrown tomatoes.
    That is exactly what it smelled like in the Carol Raye Dowling Health Services Center at the University of South Carolina Lancaster where in mid-June participants peeled and quartered dozens of tomatoes during Clemson University Cooperation Extension’s hands-on canning course.
    Canning is one of the most time-tested ways to preserve that smell and taste of fresh food, but it must be done carefully.

  • – Editor’s note: W.B. Evans is on the mend after a recent at-home mishap. “I climbed a ladder and fell off, simple as that,” he said. “I ain’t as young as I sometimes think I am.” We are reprinting this Remember When column on Vacation Bible School that was originally published in the June 29, 2008, edition of The Lancaster News.

    No sooner had the final school bell rung for our last day at Chesterfield Avenue Grammar School, the bell at First Baptist Church peeled, summoning all of us to Vacation Bible School.

  • Name: Josh McNeal IV
    Age: 25
    Address: Sunshine Road
    Family: Dad, the Rev. Willie McNeal; mom, Robin Stevenson, and three brothers, Adrian McGriff, Quacy McNeal and Willie McNeal Jr.   
    Job: Graduate assistant for the Southern Political Science Association
    Hobbies: Working out, Gamecocks football and baseball, videography, golf and watching the TV news
    Favorite book: “Strivers Row” by Kevin Baker

  • Eighteen-year-old Morgan “Hot Shoe” Turpen has lofty dreams.

    They include earning an education degree from the University of Memphis and becoming a teacher and high school softball coach and possibly, one day, a principal.

    But should that plan go awry, the Cordova, Tenn., native does have a back-up.

    For now, she has a 1,300-pound winged sprint car with a 360-cubic, 700-horsepower engine and a pair of racing gloves to fall back on. Later on, if she continues to grow and develop, that could mean NASCAR. 

  • I have breaking news: Our neighborhoods have disappeared.
    The young folks moved away and the older folks have gotten older or moved on, too.
    What happened? Our neighborhoods are now full of strangers who seldom speak, much less wave.
    Why are there no children riding tricycles or scooters on the sidewalks?
    Shucks, most recently developed neighborhoods don’t even have sidewalks. For that matter, most of  the residents don’t even know what a scooter is.

  • Elizabeth M. Hunter has been named the Lancaster Soil and Water Conservation District’s Conservation Farmer of the Year for 2010.  
    This annual award recognizes a county farmer who protects natural resources to an unusually high degree or in an innovative way.

  • Name: Maria Campos
    Age: 30
    Address: Holly Dale Drive
    Family: Husband, Hugo Campos, and a daughter, Mabelyn Campos  
    Job: Volunteer for ESL (English as a Second Language)
    Church: St. Catherine Catholic Church
    Hobbies: Reading and watching movies
    Favorite movie: “The Notebook”
    Favorite book: The Bible
    Favorite food: Mexican food

  • Nine years ago, when Ronnie and Crystal Carnes bought their home at 1228 Kent Drive, the contractor made them an offer they couldn’t refuse. The price of the new home was reduced if they agreed to do all the landscaping themselves.  

    Having a special knack for landscaping, Ronnie welcomed and accepted the deal.   

    Now, by reading do-it-yourself magazines, driving through neighborhoods and picking up a few tips from previous Yard of the Month recipients, he has created quite a showplace at their home. 

  • They have a wholesalers license and their product is certified as a South Carolina product. In fact, Barbara Lyles and Barbara Hilton even have a certificate from the Department of Homeland Security.

    “We are certified as not being terrorists,” Lyles said.

    Their product is made in South Carolina and they are licensed to sell. Homeland Security might want to rethink their designation, though, because the cheesecakes Lyles and Hilton make in their small business are definitely “the bomb.”

  • According to the Hearth, Patio and Barbecue’s 2011 National Barbecue Poll, 70 percent of Americans prefer to cook out over eating out as a way to save money.

    If dad enjoys cooking out, firing up the grill for Father’s Day is a natural, low cost fit. It can be fun, easy and a stress-free way to avoid long restaurant lines.

    Instead of a gift card, new tie, socks or shirt, why not make your dad feel like a king with a great Father’s Day meal that will put a smile on his face?

  • Boy, I sure am feeling much safer.  For a few dollars each month I can now protect myself from identity loss.

    Somebody wanting to be me... imagine that. 

    According to the television commercials, somebody out there is just waiting to swipe my credit card and charge thousands of dollars to it. 

    To tell the truth, with my credit score, that would be a real feat, if you get my drift.

    You know, all this identification stuff is sorta hard to grasp.

  • FORT LAWN – Time sure flies. 

    In 1953, Robert “Bobby” Edwards went to work part time for his uncle, Pleas Baker, at Catawba Fish Camp on S.C. 9, after serving a hitch in the U.S. Army as a mess sergeant. He was 24 years old.

    Then in 1968, when Baker retired, Edwards quit a good job at the Rock Hill Bleachery after 23 years and took over the fish camp full time. Edwards was told by a bleachery supervisor that he was making a mistake.   

  • In the late 1700s, there were no neighborhood grocery stores for food or seasonings or pharmacies for medicines in the Waxhaws.

    Self-sufficiency was a critical element of survival for the Scots-Irish settlers who were carving a way of life out of the wilderness.

    That meant most families had a kitchen garden close to the house, where vegetables, fruit and herbs were grown. 

  • When it comes to grilling out, nothing beats hot dogs and hamburgers, but sometimes you need to kick it up a notch.

    That’s where a good marinade comes in.

    Marinades are a great way to add spice and flavor before grilling. 

    You can also make the most of an inexpensive cut of meat with a marinade by turning cheap choice into prime steak.

    There are tons of store-bought varieties, but you can save money by easily preparing your own from scratch.

  • The city of Lancaster’s summer outdoor movie and concert series kicks off this week.

    Caroline Hasty, events and promotions manager for the city of Lancaster, said there will be a movie on the second Saturday of each month through September.

    Beginning Saturday, Hasty said families can bring chairs and blankets to the corner of Gay and Main streets for “Movies in the City.”

    All the movies are free and concessions will be sold.

  •  American history was recently on display in the form of a green antique railroad car. 

    Her name is the Pullman Sunbeam, and she had been under wraps the last few years at the L&C Railway headquarters on South Main Street in Lancaster. 

    A Vermont museum asked Bob Willetts if he and others at the railway would take on the task of restoring the Sunbeam to its original form of more than 100 years ago. 

    Willetts agreed and now three years later, they talk proudly about a project that is just about complete.