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Features

  • Something big was going on down at Dr. Strait’s old homeplace. 

    Since it was only three houses up Chesterfield Avenue toward town, I decided to mosey down there to see what all the commotion was about. 

    After talkin’ to some of the working fellas, one of ’em spilled the beans.

    “Son, they’re gonna build a brand new grammar school right here on this hill,” he said. 

    Boy, that was good news for me. It meant I wouldn’t have to go across town to Central School.

  • Name: Ruthie M. Hayden

    Age: 76

    Address: Northwest Apartments

    Family: Children, Linda, 58, Jean, 55, James, 54, Cynthia, 43, and Eric, 37; 17 grandchildren, 24 great-grandchildren and two great-great-grandchildren 

    Job: Homemaker

    Church: Resurrection of Life Ministries

    Hobbies: Reading and going to church

  • “How often should I water?” is perhaps the most frequently asked question by those who enjoy indoor potted plants.
    But there is no pat answer to the question. “Water it as much as it needs to grow” isn’t the right reply.
    Variables such as plant type, plant age, growth stage, season, location, type and size of pot, soil mix characteristics, weather and placement have to be considered.
    According to the Clemson University Cooperative Extension Service, the main cause of death of potted plants is over-watering.

  • Sherry Archie

    For The Lancaster News

    For 10 months out of the year, the Lancaster County of Garden Clubs selects a Yard of the Month. In July each year, that focus shifts to vegetable gardens in Lancaster County.

    Peggy Little of The Lancaster Garden Club awarded the July Garden of the Month designation to John Troutman at 1904 Tara Trail, Lancaster. 

  • The animal actor that has graced the big screen, television movies, talk shows and magazine covers, is coming here.

    Jeff Watson and Brody the bear will stop by Nutramax Laboratories in Lancaster Business Park on Monday for a short visit.

    Don’t be fooled by the 1,300-pound Kodiak grizzly’s soft, brown cuddly fur, amber eyes, turned up nose and sweet face. 

    Raised by Watson since he was 8 weeks old, Brody is a trained actor in every sense.

  • Sometimes, you don’t know until you try.                                          

    If you happened to be on Main Street last Thursday afternoon, you would have seen me and photographer Aaron Morrison try a stunt that the late Pierce Horton Sr. of the Corner Drug Store did more than 60 years ago.

    We were trying to see if it was hot enough to fry an egg on the sidewalk.

  • Homer and Brenda Harmon of Great Falls were in Rock Hill when they decided to eat at Kentucky Fried Chicken.

    “We went in to eat, but we didn’t get to,” Homer said.

    That’s because Homer was outfitted in white pants, a white jacket with a black handkerchief tucked inside and a white shirt with his colonel’s “signature” string tie. He wore framed glasses and carried a walking cane.

  • I walked by the county jail and library on my way to Lancaster High School just about every day.

    I was always fascinated when I stopped by the old library at the corner of Gay and French Streets.

    To me, it was amazing to watch librarian Miss Robbie Horton work. 

    While I struggled to find stuff using the formula Melvil Dewey devised, she never did. 

    Shucks, Miss Robbie made it look easy; she knew where every book and volume was. She was the best book finder and put ’er backer I ever saw.   

  • Name: Glenda Manus

    Age: 62

    Address: Steele Hill Road, Van Wyck

    Family: Husband, Henry; daughters, Krista Cook and Laura Whittaker  

    Pets: A dog named Fox and a Polish hen named Olive

    Job: Retired from Union County (N.C.) public schools

    Church: Van Wyck Presbyterian Church

    Hobbies: Reading and writing

  •     The teacher who had a special love for reading now has a special place in her honor at the school she loved.

    In May, members of the late Kathy Emory’s family, colleagues and friends dedicated the Miss Kathy Emory Outdoor Reading Classroom at McDonald Green Elementary School.

    Emory died Dec. 24, 2010, after battling colon cancer for more than two years. She was 52. 

    Emory served on the McDonald Green staff for more than 30 years as a fourth grade teacher and media specialist. 

  • These days, when Dale Walker goes shopping, you can count on there being a notebook full of manufacturer’s coupons open on the baby seat in the top of her shopping cart.

    “It’s all about saving money,” Walker said. “You’ll do anything you can to save money these days.”

    A rough economy has reversed a 14-year decline in coupon redemption in the United States.

  • The last few days have been miserably hot. It kind of reminds me of when the U.S. Army came to town for a round of war games.

    America was getting a bit antsy with all the saber-rattling going on in Europe.

    Given the situation, somebody up and decided to call out our soldiers in the middle of a really hot summer for military maneuvers.

    You know, it takes two sides to argue, fight or have a war, even if it’s just playin’ war.

  • Name: Mary Ida Lucas

    Age: 102; I will be 103 on Aug. 7.

    Address: New Hope Road, Heath Springs

    Family: Husband, the late James Lloyd Lucas; four children, Arthur Lucas, Marian McNeely, Mary Powers and Edith Taylor; 13 grandchildren; 19 great-grandchildren and 13 great great-grandchildren  

    Job: Retired, Springs Industries

    Church: Grace United Methodist Church

  • Coupon-clipping has become so popular that some stores are now advertising items to match manufacturer’s coupons.

    However, some of them have also revised their coupon policies to limit what customers can and cannot do.

    Many retailers are attributing the changes to TLC’s popular “Extreme Couponing” show, which showcases over-the-top couponing practices.

  • It was a sound that brought summer to a halt along every Erwin Farm street.         If we were racing our home-made, human-powered go-carts made from worn-out mower wheels, discarded lumber, rope steering and axles fashioned from metal rods discovered in a pile of rubbish from the old mill trash pile off Laurel Avenue, this sound would bring out a red flag as it drew closer and closer.

  • During summer months, days are longer and more people are outside for longer periods of time, increasing the health risks from heat exhaustion and overexposure to the sun.
    Each year, more Americans on average die from heat waves than from any other natural disaster.
    And every hour, one person dies from skin cancer, which is the most common occurring cancer in the Unied States.
    Staying cool
    To avoid heat exhaustion and overexposure to the sun, follow these steps to stay cool and safe this summer:

  • Eating your own words (or thoughts) isn’t always the most appetizing thing on the menu. 

    Like castor oil, it can get something stuck out of your system.

    You know, I’ve read my share of letters to the editor from folks who want to thank others for doing the job they are paid to do. 

    And most of the time, I made light of their letters. 

    However, that chicken has come home to roost and is crowing away atop a house gutter.

  • Within the next couple of months, Robert Truesdale’s “office” will be empty.

    That office is the seed counter in Ace Hardware and Garden Center of Lancaster, where Truesdale has weighed out seed of every kind and shape in the last 54 years. Truesdale, now a part time “feed and seed store” employee, will soon weigh out his last bag for one of the farmers who stop by to trade hearty stories and conversation.

    That’s because Lancaster is losing one of its oldest businesses. 

  • Name: Trish Hinson

    Age: 42

    Address: Hula Drive

    Family: Husband, Joel, 45, and a daughter, Katie Hope Hinson, 17  

    Pets: Zoe, a dapple dachshund, and four treeing walker hounds

    Job: Lancaster County 911 addressing 

    Church: Rich Hill Baptist Church

  • Mosquitoes have been around for thousands, maybe millions, of years.

    And these winged blood suckers have no intention of taking off this summer.

    With the pop-up thunderstorm season now in full swing, it doesn’t take much to create a mosquito nuisance, said Sue Ferguson, an environmental health manager for S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control.

    That’s where a little routine yard sprucing-up comes in.