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Features

  • For Jan Hicks, the pink ribbon on her Springs Memorial Hospital employee badge isn’t a reminder that October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

    As a registered nurse and case manager, Hicks doesn’t need a decal on her name tag to remember that. 

    Right now, many in the medical field are supporting men and women who have survived, or are battling breast cancer. 

    That comes with the territory for Hicks and her colleagues. 

  • We’ve sprung through spring and splashed through summer. Autumn splendor is on its way; Carolina blue skies will backdrop leaves of ambers, ochres and rich reds. Temperatures will drop and fall foliage will soon follow. Don’t miss a chance this year to see fall in all its majesty.

    While there are countless locations to enjoy autumn colors right here in Lancaster County – including your own backyard – you can also pack a picnic and take a day or weekend trip to soak up the changing of seasons. 

  • What a summer – and how quickly fall has arrived!

    Thank you, friends, family, business associates and members for the many ways you have welcomed me as the new executive director of the Lancaster County Council of the Arts.  

    For me, coming to work in the beautiful, historic Springs House every day in the community I love (with access to a beautiful grand piano on the first floor) is a sign that life is good.

  • Some things don’t need fixing and can’t be improved on.

    Take country ham, for instance.

    I’ll wager your mouth is watering right now. 

    To me, country ham is the ultimate ingredient of Southern cuisine. Molasses finishes a close second.

    Forget the macaroni and cheese, peanut butter and jelly, meatloaf and mashed ’taters. I’ll take country ham every time.  

  • One of the marvels of modern society is the ability to read the views of various folks who contribute to newspapers all over the world. In case you missed it, we just celebrated National Newspaper Week.

    According to the latest research, almost 70 percent of your neighbors have read either a printed newspaper or a cyberspace version in the last seven days.

    I think it’s because the old black and white and “read all over” newspaper is still the most trusted source of local news we have.

  • Drivers revved their machines at the starting line. 

    When the green flag dropped, they were off, sewing wide open. 

    The Ragin’ Cajun, who was on the pole, jumped out to a quick lead, dogged closely by Cannonball, Burn Out Babs and the rest of the pack. 

    Pit crew chiefs with names like Flash and Oil Can scrambled to keep their drivers moving. 

    Race car fans, don’t think you’re losing it if these names aren’t familiar, because this race was not at Lancaster Speedway. 

  • After Saturday’s inaugural charity run, Elaine Adkins is a believer in new math. 

    Why?

    Because 117 miles plus 44 riders equals $4,526.56 and 3,000 pounds of food.

    Those totals – thanks to the hard work of the Widows Sons Masonic Riders Association and 11 local masonic lodges – refilled the food pantry at HOPE in Lancaster.

  • The Native American studies program and the Catawba pottery collection at the University of South Carolina Lancaster is getting some coast-to-coast exposure.

    It is being featured as one of three segments in a national television commercial for the University of South Carolina that is getting airplay during Gamecocks sporting events. It is also broadcast during “The Steve Spurrier Show.”

  • My wife wanted some nice, fresh sand around a flower bed. 

    It was a simple request, and just as any well-intentioned man of the house would do, I managed to postpone it as long as possible. 

    However, my excuse well had run dry. This was one honey-do task I was not looking forward to. 

    At first, I considered a trip to Porter-Belk Lumber Co. for a couple bags of sand. But, hey, that costs money. 

    These days, with all of this green-thinking, recycling is back in style. 

  •  

    KERSHAW – Before Tuesday’s volleyball game between Andrew Jackson High School and Central of Pageland is over, there is a chance that the Lady Vols’ Tori Roberts may be called on to serve. 

    It may be her 17th birthday, but she won’t let that cause a distraction. 

    Tori has the determination to succeed at everything she does. Just ask Pastor Pablo Tayupanda and his wife, Marcella. 

  • The element of surprise was not a factor when Buford Middle School opened football practice in August for the 2011 season. Not for BMS veteran football coach Greg Caskey, who among his new players was Tory Knight, 12.

    Knight, a Buford Middle seventh-grader, is a girl.

    Still for Caskey, it wasn’t stunning to see Knight out for the team.

    “I wasn’t surprised in the least bit,” Caskey said. “She had told me as a sixth-grader in my physical education class she was coming out for the team.

  • One of the best way to showcase the delicious flavors of early fall is with a homemade apple pie.

    What makes apples and apple pie so all-American?

    “It brings people together,” said Ken Haedrich, author of “Apple Pie: 100 Delicious and Decidedly Different Recipes for America’s Favorite Pie.” 

    “It’s the closest thing we have, food-wise, to a universal symbol of goodness and contentment.”

  • My idea of shopping usually involves a mall bench. 

    Recently, while sitting on one, itching for the stores to cut out the lights, I spied an electronics store right across from my perch. I couldn’t help but notice young people going in and out of it. 

    You know, sometimes an old man’s curious nature gets the best of me. 

    In my case, that nosiness – uh, curiosity – dates back to summer evenings in 1942. 

  • Name: Linda Bell

    Age: 64

    Address: The Buford community

    Family: A son, Travis and a grandson, Hunter, 7

    Job: Retired elementary school teacher

    Church: Pleasant Dale Baptist Church

    Hobbies: I enjoy spending time with my grandson, watching Gamecocks football, gardening and exercising

  • The jet-setting lifestyle came easy for J.T. Franklin. It’s no wonder he was smiling.

    His grin came from helping estimate, design and oversee the electrical components of facilities like the $143 million Mecklenburg County Courthouse with its 39 courtrooms, the $27 million Billy Graham Library and 44 hospitals from coast to coast.

  • When it comes to adding variety, flavor and aroma to foods, herbs and spices have been used for centuries.

    “Spices were once so costly only the wealthy could afford them. In 11th century Europe, many towns paid their taxes and rent in pepper,” said dietitian and educator Alice Henneman, author of “Add a Little Spice (& Herbs) to Your Life!”

    While it is a given that spices and herbs both come from for plants, that’s where the similarity ends, said Ann Hertzler of Virginia Cooperative Extension Service.

  • Name: Becky Harper

    Age: 44

    Address: West Doc Garris Road

    Family: Husband, Tim, 45; a son, Joshua Rhyner, 21, a stepdaughter, Meg, 20, and a stepson, Richie, 18 

    Pets: A rat terrier, Abby; a Chesapeake Bay retriever, Hercules, and a quarter horse, Ruby

    Job: Stylist at Mane Street Hair Designers

    Church: Second Baptist Church

  • American diarist and suffragette Ellen Birdseye Wheaton one wrote, “All my scattering moments are taken up with my needle.”

    Van Wyck seamstress Janie Straight knows that truth first hand.

    A self-professed former hippie in 1970s California who has worked as a waitress, journalist, typesetter and sign painter (to name a few), Straight, 56, left the chaotic world of Los Angeles and settled in South Carolina with husband, Dennis, 16 years ago.

  • Times are pretty lean for a lot of folks right now.    

    I hate to paint a bad picture, but they’re gonna get tougher before we see a turnaround. 

    The stock market is moving like a roller coaster again. 

    Some of us older folks have been on this ride before.

    We have leadership in Washington, D.C., that is capable of giving folks a leg up, but there are others who condemn them for helping the hurting.

  • Nancy K. Starnes found this Peach Pound Cake recipe in the S.C. Farmers Market Bulletin. Submitted to the publication by Jackie Blanton of Gaffney, Starnes said the recipe took first place honors at the 2004 Gaffney Peach Festival.

    “I thought some readers may enjoy it since some peaches are still available,” she said. “I’ve made this cake two times and it is simply delicious. It makes a large pound cake and is worth every bit of the trouble.”

    Peach Pound Cake

    Ingredients