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Features

  • For years, there were two vacant lots between our house and the one where the family of building contractor Mr. Barney Gardner lived. 

    Those overgrown fields were the setting for many adventures such as fighting wild animals in the jungle or standing off an Indian attack on the prairie.

    But all good things eventually come to an end. One of the fields disappeared when Mr. Ned Gregory, Sr., and his wife Mrs. Lucille, built a two-story brick house next door to us.

  • Most of the time, the doctor does the talking and the patient does the listening. Some physicians are even apprehensive about dropping their guard to pray with patients.

    However, that’s not the case for cancer specialist Dr. Kashyap Patel of Carolina Blood and Cancer Care, or at least not anymore. 

    Now, Patel, the vice chief of staff for Springs Memorial Hospital, does both.

  • Editor’s note – The Lancaster News recently asked readers on Facebook to share the names of some of the county’s best foodies. One of them is Cathy Ardrey. 

     

    Cathy Ardrey’s family thinks she’s a great cook, with good reason. 

    From vegetables to wild game and seafood, Ardrey has an arsenal of dishes, many of which she’s developed herself or adapted from recipes found in her cookbook library. 

  • Cool mornings and warm afternoons pretty much sum up the weather on Chesterfield Avenue this week. We wrapped up a few of the big pears in tissue paper and placed them in a corner of the back porch. 

    Those pears will taste just right around Thanksgiving.

    The talk of the town was politics, chewing tobacco, elephants and airplanes, depending on what circle you ran with.

  • Editor’s note – The Lancaster News recently asked readers on its Facebook page to share memories on family members who proudly served in the United States military. Here is Mickey R. Hinson Sr.‘s story on his dad, the late John Harry Hinson, who died Feb. 16, 2008, at the age of 92.

     

    This was my father in the U.S. Army infantry in Germany and Italy in World War II. 

  • What turns a dish into a comfort food?

    There is no simple answer.

    Scientists who study happiness theorize that it happens whenever nostalgia meets nourishing food in a nourishing environment.

    With comfort food, it’s never about the amount of money that is spent.

    For some, it may be when we are surrounded by family and friends enjoying a no-frills meal that includes old-fashioned meat loaf, macaroni and cheese or a green bean casserole.

  • Lancaster folks were a bit antsy the last week of October 1940.

    All of this war stuff was taking a toll. 

    James Williams of Route 4 and Henry Flynn of Elm Street were among the first soldiers whose draft numbers were drawn from a fish bowl in Washington, D.C., that week.

    It had been a tough week. Friday night’s weather had messed up the football game between Lancaster and Fort Mill. The game ended in a 7-7 tie. Some didn’t go ’cause of the rain and the ones who went were mad about the outcome.

  • These days, translating “de mortuis nihil nisi bonum” from Latin is easy. Just Google it. It means “of the dead (say) nothing but good.”

    But those around Lancaster County didn’t heed that advice 155 years ago when mysterious innkeeper Milt Chaney swung from a scaffold outside the Lancaster County Jail on Gay Street.

  • Heirloom pumpkins, mums, autumn wreaths, flags and pillows add special touches that greet the season at the home of Frank and Corinne Brackett, located at 714 Plantation Road.  

    These special touches and the natural beauty of the landscaping prompted the Lancaster Council of Garden Clubs to choose the Bracketts for the October Yard of the Month. Selected by Betsy Folks and Sheila Roberts of The Lancaster Garden Club, the Brackett yard is loaded with perfect fall flavors.

  • It’s almost Halloween and it seems I’m the only one in the family who is excited about it.

    Sometimes, my offspring can be a bunch of fuddy-duddies. But that’s OK. I’ll take up the slack for their indifference by setting the mood, just as I did last year.

    With great-grandkids running around under foot and nobody else showing much interest, I figured it was up to me to teach them the intricacies of trickin’ and treatin.’

  • Name: Danny Johnson

    Age: 58

    Address: Loading Road

    Family: Wife, Barbara, 52; a daughter, Stephanie Roney, 29

    Pets: Two ducks on my pond 

    Job: Retired service technician for Pepsi Cola (18 years)

    Church: Pastor of Heartland Freewill Baptist Church

    Hobbies: Pastoring and farming with my tractor

  • For Jan Hicks, the pink ribbon on her Springs Memorial Hospital employee badge isn’t a reminder that October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

    As a registered nurse and case manager, Hicks doesn’t need a decal on her name tag to remember that. 

    Right now, many in the medical field are supporting men and women who have survived, or are battling breast cancer. 

    That comes with the territory for Hicks and her colleagues. 

  • We’ve sprung through spring and splashed through summer. Autumn splendor is on its way; Carolina blue skies will backdrop leaves of ambers, ochres and rich reds. Temperatures will drop and fall foliage will soon follow. Don’t miss a chance this year to see fall in all its majesty.

    While there are countless locations to enjoy autumn colors right here in Lancaster County – including your own backyard – you can also pack a picnic and take a day or weekend trip to soak up the changing of seasons. 

  • What a summer – and how quickly fall has arrived!

    Thank you, friends, family, business associates and members for the many ways you have welcomed me as the new executive director of the Lancaster County Council of the Arts.  

    For me, coming to work in the beautiful, historic Springs House every day in the community I love (with access to a beautiful grand piano on the first floor) is a sign that life is good.

  • Some things don’t need fixing and can’t be improved on.

    Take country ham, for instance.

    I’ll wager your mouth is watering right now. 

    To me, country ham is the ultimate ingredient of Southern cuisine. Molasses finishes a close second.

    Forget the macaroni and cheese, peanut butter and jelly, meatloaf and mashed ’taters. I’ll take country ham every time.  

  • One of the marvels of modern society is the ability to read the views of various folks who contribute to newspapers all over the world. In case you missed it, we just celebrated National Newspaper Week.

    According to the latest research, almost 70 percent of your neighbors have read either a printed newspaper or a cyberspace version in the last seven days.

    I think it’s because the old black and white and “read all over” newspaper is still the most trusted source of local news we have.

  • Drivers revved their machines at the starting line. 

    When the green flag dropped, they were off, sewing wide open. 

    The Ragin’ Cajun, who was on the pole, jumped out to a quick lead, dogged closely by Cannonball, Burn Out Babs and the rest of the pack. 

    Pit crew chiefs with names like Flash and Oil Can scrambled to keep their drivers moving. 

    Race car fans, don’t think you’re losing it if these names aren’t familiar, because this race was not at Lancaster Speedway. 

  • After Saturday’s inaugural charity run, Elaine Adkins is a believer in new math. 

    Why?

    Because 117 miles plus 44 riders equals $4,526.56 and 3,000 pounds of food.

    Those totals – thanks to the hard work of the Widows Sons Masonic Riders Association and 11 local masonic lodges – refilled the food pantry at HOPE in Lancaster.

  • The Native American studies program and the Catawba pottery collection at the University of South Carolina Lancaster is getting some coast-to-coast exposure.

    It is being featured as one of three segments in a national television commercial for the University of South Carolina that is getting airplay during Gamecocks sporting events. It is also broadcast during “The Steve Spurrier Show.”

  • My wife wanted some nice, fresh sand around a flower bed. 

    It was a simple request, and just as any well-intentioned man of the house would do, I managed to postpone it as long as possible. 

    However, my excuse well had run dry. This was one honey-do task I was not looking forward to. 

    At first, I considered a trip to Porter-Belk Lumber Co. for a couple bags of sand. But, hey, that costs money. 

    These days, with all of this green-thinking, recycling is back in style.