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Features

  • This Sunday, Dec. 8, the Lancaster Garden Club will sponsor its annual Tour of Homes.

    The tour begins at  2 p.m. and is part of the Red Rose Holiday Tour taking place this weekend, Dec. 6-8.

    Now in its 27th year, the tour will feature three Forest Hills homes and one downtown location, all decorated for the holiday season.

  • David Kellin, a Kershaw transplant originally from Crandon Wis., is probably best known for his private practice at Kershaw Counseling as a 22-year trauma-focused counselor for sexually-abused youth.

    Others might recognize his name as the professional photographer at Sara’s Dad’s Photography or a freelance photographer whose works appear in several publications.

    Even still, his personal fan club of barbecue aficionados know him for “DK’s worst BBQ in South Carolina,” he chuckled and said.

  • North Corner AME Zion Church has been a cornerstone in Lancaster County for 148 years.  

    The congregation celebrated its anniversary Sunday, Nov. 3, with a special service including a guest choir and proclamations from the city and county. It’s the first time the church has recognized the event. 

    When former slaves organized the church in 1865, its first services were held in an old shop near Waxhaw Presbyterian Church. 

  • A group of Dabney family members from across the state met in late October to preview plans for a new book, “The Dabneys of South Carolina,” to be published in early 2014.

    The event was hosted by Doris Faye Vinson at her home in Camden. 

  •  Amanda Harris

    For The Lancaster News

    Handmade jewelry, woodcraft and much more will line the tables as local vendors provide the perfect opportunity for residents to get a head start on their Christmas shopping while supporting a good cause.

    The Lancaster Woman’s Club Mistletoe Market is 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 16, at Covenant Baptist Church,165 Craig Manor Road.

  • What began as a recreational sport has turned into a profession sport for Indian Land resident Ricky Wysocki.

    Wysocki, 20, is now ranked No. 2 in the world by the Professional Disc Golf Association.

    Disc golf is a popular sport that replaces a golf ball with a Frisbee and a hole in the ground with a chain basket on a post.

    Otherwise, the same rules apply as in golf.
    Wysocki recently participated in the U.S. Disc Golf Championship, held
    Oct. 2-5 at Winthrop University in Rock Hill.

    He tied for 24th out of 60 competitors in the open flight, with scores of 62, 67, 62 and 65.

  • Michele Roberts
    For Carolina Gateway
    INDIAN LAND – An Indian Land family has made a bike ride for charity a family tradition, with three generations riding together in the annual Bike MS: PGA Tour 150K Cycle to the Shore bike ride, held Sept. 28-29 in Florida.
    Ricky Montgomery, 44, has participated in the ride six times.
    His father, David Montgomery, 74, has ridden in the event for 15 years.

  • Staff Reports
    Two Lancaster County Sheriff’s deputies traveled to Albuquerque, N.M., to compete in the National Police Shooting Championships Sept. 13-17.
    The NPSC is an annual event held in Albuquerque and features about 300 law enforcement officers from all over the country and several from foreign countries. The NPSC is comprised of a multitude of different shooting events. Competitors choose which events they participate in.

  • Chris McGinn
    For The Lancaster News
    “We are in an ever-deepening child-rearing crisis, and we need to wake up!” parenting expert John Rosemond told parents at Pleasant Hill United Methodist Church on Sept. 22.
    The church invited Rosemond to deliver his “Parenting with Love and Leadership from Tots to Teens,” a three-hour seminar on his common-sense approach to child-rearing. About 40 parents attended the event  in the church sanctuary.

  • Seven years ago, Tom and Hope Davis chose Lancaster as their new home. Relocating here from Virginia, they headed south to be closer to their children who live in Belmont, N.C., and at the time, a little further away in Florida.  While home searching, they found the perfect house at 4060 Flint Drive in the Shiloh Commons neighborhood.  

  • This is a Halloween tale, especially for my friend, Bill, in Kershaw. Bill has difficulty seeing these days, but can still picture it in his mind. I’m sure someone will read it to him.

    It was the last of October and the wind was whistling along Chesterfield Avenue.

    Aunt Bess told me that the cold air must have been blowing in from some icy place far away.

  • Members of Lancaster County EMS, the Lancaster County Sheriff’s Department and the city of Lancaster Fire Department are coming together for a night of fun and comedy to raise money for the Disabled American Veterans Chapter in Lancaster.

    The “Tribute To Veterans – A Variety and Comedy Show” will take place on Nov. 1 at 7 p.m. in the Bundy Auditorium at University of South Carolina Lancaster.

  • October is Family Promise Awareness Month, when a local and national focus is put on the problem of homelessness – more specifically the homelessness of children – in Lancaster County and across the country.

    Family Promise was founded in 1988 and is a national non-profit organization that mobilizes communities and existing resources to help homeless families regain their independence. 

  • Sunday, Oct. 20, will simultaneously mark two firsts for Lancaster – the first piano-string trio performance since the Vivian Major Robinson Concert series began more than 10 years ago, and the first ever piano-string performance at the Cultural Arts Center.

    Three talented musicians from different parts of the globe form the Sekino-Kim-Gruber trio. 

  • The Springs House was alive with activity on Thursday, Oct. 10, as board members and guests gathered for a reception to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the Lancaster County Community Foundation.

    Debbie Jailette, immediate past chair of the foundation, played the piano as attendees chatted and enjoyed cocktails and hors d’oeuvres during the reception. 

    Current foundation chair Audrey Curry spoke about the foundation’s beginnings and where it stands today.

  • Theater lovers, mark your calendars – the Community Playhouse of Lancaster County is bringing the Harper Lee classic “To Kill A Mockingbird” to the stage at the Barr Street Auditorium this month.

    Directed by Chris Smith, this revised version of “To Kill A Mockinbird” by Christopher Sergel tells the story of Scout, her brother Jem and her father, the attorney Atticus Finch, who finds himself defending a black man charged with the  rape of a white woman. The time is 1935, the place is southern Alabama.

  • The Lancaster County Community Foundation (LCCF) is celebrating its 25th anniversary with a special reception at The Springs House on Thursday, Oct. 10.

    Established in 1988, the foundation was created in order to increase the charitable giving resources in Lancaster County. 

    An initial gift of $50,000 from the Springs Close Foundation got the foundation started. 

  •  KARE release

    Kershaw Area Resource Community Exchange (KARE) announces a weekend of beauty and hope.  With an eye on the future, KARE continues not only to assist neighbors in financial crisis, but also empower them to take charge of their futures. 

    Through educational workshops – a program that continues to expand – participants are taught various skills that will assist in money saving, further life skill development, networking and more.  

  • Just a Pinch

    By Janet Tharpe

     “No self-respecting Southerner uses instant grits!”

    Ahem, I beg to differ. This line from the film “My Cousin Vinny” may have made the legal case for the lead character, but it doesn’t hold water in my way of thinking. 

    I also take goodnatured issue with the notion that Northerners aren’t able to “get” this A.M delicacy. 

  •  There I was, sitting at my desk, writing a story on deadline and sipping from a tall cup of iced coffee, when I heard a comment that turned my head. 

    “Chris, I just have to tell you that I can’t stand iced coffee,” said my coworker, and occasional chef, Greg Summers. “Hot coffee is where it’s at. I’ll never figure out the appeal of that cold stuff. I just don’t get it. Coffee is ’sposed to be hot enough to take hair off a hog’s back.”