• Ashley Lowrimore
    For The Lancaster News

    After a devastating accident, Frances and Cecil Clifton leaned on faith, family, friends, and each other to overcome an unimaginable prognosis.
    On Tuesday, Nov. 25 1993, the couple, both newly-retired from Springs’ bleachery, stopped to visit at Frances’ mother’s house. While outside, Cecil climbed up a pecan tree so that he could shake pecans loose for the ladies to gather up from the ground.

  • A group of local quilters are looking to add to their ranks in a national grassroots community service effort to make quilts for active military and veterans as a thank you for their service.
    The Piecemakers Quilting Guild meets the second Monday of each month at Heath Springs Baptist Church in Heath Springs and has made Quilts of Valor a service project for the last two years. Together, the ladies have made close to 100 quilts.

  • Nancy Parsons
    Landmark News Services

    The rain did not stop a group of eager people from hopping aboard one of two pontoon boats to travel from the Debutary Creek access area to Stumpy Pond in August.
    The boaters, members of the Great Falls Town Council and Great Falls Home Town Association, wanted to see the areas Duke Energy plans to focus on as part of recreational upgrades included in its relicensing agreement.

  • David Kellin
    For The Lancaster News

    Those who attended the annual horse show and family fun day at Horse N Around Saturday, Aug. 29, were treated to numerous activities, events and food under clear skies and comfortable temperatures.
    Horse N Around, 2593 N. Rocky River Road, provides equine therapy to children with special challenges.
    Several children got the opportunity to show their riding skills at the event.

  • From release
    “Between the Springmaid Sheets,” an exhibit of works of art from legendary Col. Elliott Springs’ daring 1940s and 1950s ad campaign will be on view from Nov. 4 to Dec. 29 in Lancaster. The controversial campaign is credited with rescuing a struggling textile business and helping Springs Cotton Mills become a giant of the industry.

  • Dori and Dan Schaupp married 37 years ago and have had vegetable garden every year. At their home at 1310 Crestfield Drive, they faced a challenge. The backyard retained water when it rained and became marshy, making gardening next to impossible. Their solution was to create raised garden beds.
    In 2004, they began with four raised beds with mainly vegetables and a small space for herbs. Over the years the number of beds has grown.

  • What exactly am I eating?
    That’s the question I pondered as I took a big bite from a strangely adorned slice of pizza one morning on my way to work.
    ‘Pizza for breakfast?,’ you might ask. Well, stop your judging for just a minute and let me explain. It’s not what you think.

  • Sue and Michael Mangum have lived at 136 Evergreen Road for the last 20 years. During this time they have enjoyed keeping their yard well-manicured, neat and full of seasonal blooms. Until now, little did they know that others admired their yard, too. They received an unprecedented five nominations for Yard of the Month recently.  
    After learning of these nominations and viewing the yard herself, Elaine Atkins with Leaf and Petal Garden Club agreed and selected the Mangums’ yard as the June Yard of the Month.

  • Recently chicken was on sale at the grocery store so I stocked up. Each time I open my freezer, though, I realize I may have gone a bit overboard.

    I need to clear some space, so we’re having chicken this week in my house. But I’m not worried about everyone getting bored, because there are so many delicious chicken recipes.

    I love chicken salad and Stacey Vadas’ Fabulous Chicken Salad.

  • By Debbie Jaillette

  • In June 2007, the Kingdom Heirs introduced Andy Stringfield as their new pianist.

    These days, they introduce him as their new baritone.

    No, the multi-talented 29-year-old  musician hasn’t given up on the 52 white keys and 36 black keys.

    He’s wearing two hats these days for the ambassadors of Southern gospel music.

  •  c

    cording to the Merriam-Webster Dictionary, a dream is defined as a visionary creation of the imagination. Every person has a different dream or a hope for a miracle to take place. I have a dream that special needs students will not only be accepted, but valued in society.

  • The struggles of the first battles are over. The soldiers who fought them are now safely home. They can dream of doing things they once did…but for some, it will only be a dream.

    These soldiers have returned scarred and disabled. The next battle, much harder and longer than the first, is just beginning. The disabled soldiers will need the committed love and help of others to endure their struggle.   

    Those who choose to care for them are angels in our presence. These angels are real. This is one such story. It is true.

  • Michele Roberts

    For The Lancaster News

    Just in time for Veteran’s Day, a county employee has been named to two of the top spots in the state when it comes to veterans affairs.

    Robin Helms, who was appointed director of the Veterans Affairs Office in Lancaster in 2010, took office as president of the S.C. Association of County Veterans Affairs Officers on July 1 of this year, a position she will hold until June of 2016. She was also appointed to serve on the S.C. Veterans Trust Fund board in June of this year.

  • Editor’s note: We are reprinting this Remember When column, which was originally published in the Nov. 8, 2008, edition of The Lancaster News, at the request of our readers.

    At one time, the significance of Nov. 11 – Veterans Day – wasn’t lost on anyone.

    Of course, World War I ended years before I was born, but Uncle Harry made sure I was well-schooled on what he called the War to End All Wars.

    There was a bunch of World War I soldiers around, too.

  • Amanda Harris

    For The Lancaster News

    Indian Land native Heather Holben will be hiking nearly 30 miles to help others have a little hope.

    On Saturday, Oct. 11, Holben, 38, will participate in the Make-A-Wish Trailblaze Challenge, a hike benefitting Make-A-Wish Central and Western North Carolina, an organization that grants wishes for terminally ill children.

  • By Nita Brown

    For the Lancaster News

    You’ve heard the old saying “a picture is worth a thousand words.” When it comes to preserving and enjoying history, that proverb is especially true. Fortunately, some of our very own Lancaster artists are doing their part to keep Lancaster’s history alive through visual arts. You’ll have a chance to see their work and meet some of them in person at the Cultural Arts Center, 307 W. Gay St., Lancaster, from 2 to 4 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 5.

  • Brian Garner

    Landmark News Service

    RICHBURG – For a town that was founded on catastrophe, Richburg is doing remarkably well these days.

  • Nancy Parsons

    Landmark News Service

    GREAT FALLS – For the first time in his life, Henry “Bubba” Stevenson Jr. can offer a handshake. But it’s not your everyday handshake – it’s bionic.

    Stevenson, 23, was fitted with a “1-limb ultra bionic arm” on Sept. 22.

    Stevenson was born without arms. On his right side, his arm stops shy of his elbow and on his left side, there is only a nub below his shoulder.

  • Michele Roberts

    For The Lancaster News

    The fourth annual National Missions Day will be at the Lancaster Fairgrounds from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Oct. 4.

    There is still time to register for free tent space and be a part of this large community outreach event.

    Founded by apostle Ollie Alexander, ambassador for international missions, the idea of the event is to not only reach out to the community, but foster and encourage a sense of unity between different churches, outreaches and ministries that participate.