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Features

  • Kaisha Young

    For The Lancaster News

    One girl is popular and comes from an affluent family. One girl is reserved and comes from a middle class family.

    Both give no indications that anything’s wrong, even though they are both harboring heinous secrets.

    Both are victims of teen dating violence.

    School district youth/peer counselors Deborah Boulware and Sarah Woodring know this tale all too well after hearing it time and time again.

  •  From release

    Nature lovers can become certified S.C. Master Naturalists and join a regional corps of citizen scientists by attending a weekly environmental training course beginning in March at the Anne Springs Close Greenway in Fort Mill.

    The Catawba Master Naturalist Program teaches participants how to explore the world around them, identify plants and animals, and better understand ecological concepts they can apply through volunteering in their communities. 

  •  Lancaster NAACP release

    The fellowship hall at Mount Zion AME Zion Church overflowed with attendees of all ages at the first Town Hall Meeting sponsored by the Lancaster Branch of the NAACP on Dec. 12.  

    Nearly one hundred people met to present their views on the subject “Crime Watch:  Saving Our Youth.”

  •  Sean Creeden

    USC School of Journalism 

    It’s a cool fall morning in October, and once again streets are closed across South Carolina as runners race another 5K.

    These runners rise with the sun to run in one of the many races available on any given weekend. They run to exercise, lose weight and even make friends.

  •  With the holidays and the fun family times along with delicious dinners and deserts that we are destined to eat, I’m going to give you a few extra treats on how to keep your abs and waist line in tip top shape and still enjoy eating your favorite foods. 

  •  Whether dashing to visit family or just getting away for a leisurely trip, families spend the winter holidays away from home for different reasons.

    The “Three House Run”

    Christmas travels begin at 5 a.m. Dec. 24, for the Camp family, who set out on their annual holiday journey to Warner Robins, Ga.

  • Nov. 2, 2013

    There’s got to be at least 40 volunteers here.

    Some crouching, hammers in hand. The hollow sound of tools banging against the wood echoes. The noise slicing through the autumn air. 

    Finally, the progress is visible – it’s tangible.

  • Eighty-four-year-old James Hagins is a retired Lancaster resident. He spends his days taking it easy, napping in his recliner when he feels like it. When he lost his wife of 60 years, Peggy, in September of 2012, he found an unusual outlet for his grief – quilting.

    “My mother quilted, and with eight of us children, she definitely had help when she needed it,” he said. “I didn’t mind helping her, and sometimes I was the only one she would let help, because I did things the way that suited her.”

  •  If you can’t make it the mountains to choose and cut your Christmas tree there’s no need to worry – Lancaster County has it covered.

    Papa John’s Christmas Tree Farm, located at 6980 Flat Creek Road in Kershaw, offers six different varieties of trees customers can choose and cut, including Blue Ice, Carolina Sapphire, Eastern Red Cedar, Leyland Cypress, Virginia Pine and White Pine. 

  • Decking the halls for the holidays is a beloved tradition for many families. A home’s exterior festooned with lights help create a festive holiday mood, while stockings hung by the chimney and a Christmas tree in the living room bring that holiday cheer inside.

    Though the holiday season is a festive time of year, it can quickly turn tragic if safety is not emphasized when decorating a home. When decorating this holiday season, be sure to employ the following precautions so your holiday season is festive, decorative and safe:

  • On Thanksgiving Day, Alex Sims turned 100.

     

    The Van Wyck man credits his long life to hard, but satisfying work on his 225-acre farm at the corner of U.S. 521 and S.C. 5. He bought the land after two stints in the U.S. military.

    “It doesn’t matter how much money you make if you like what you’re doing. Keep it up,” said Sims, who cut his own winter firewood with an axe until he was 97. “You have to love your life.”

  • The familiar sounds of Christmas music in concert seems the perfect way to relax and unwind on a Sunday afternoon.

    The Capital City Brass Quintet will perform at 4:30 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 8, at the Olde Presbyterian Cultural Arts Center, 307 W. Gay St., topping off a weekend packed with holiday events.

  • This Sunday, Dec. 8, the Lancaster Garden Club will sponsor its annual Tour of Homes.

    The tour begins at  2 p.m. and is part of the Red Rose Holiday Tour taking place this weekend, Dec. 6-8.

    Now in its 27th year, the tour will feature three Forest Hills homes and one downtown location, all decorated for the holiday season.

  • David Kellin, a Kershaw transplant originally from Crandon Wis., is probably best known for his private practice at Kershaw Counseling as a 22-year trauma-focused counselor for sexually-abused youth.

    Others might recognize his name as the professional photographer at Sara’s Dad’s Photography or a freelance photographer whose works appear in several publications.

    Even still, his personal fan club of barbecue aficionados know him for “DK’s worst BBQ in South Carolina,” he chuckled and said.

  • North Corner AME Zion Church has been a cornerstone in Lancaster County for 148 years.  

    The congregation celebrated its anniversary Sunday, Nov. 3, with a special service including a guest choir and proclamations from the city and county. It’s the first time the church has recognized the event. 

    When former slaves organized the church in 1865, its first services were held in an old shop near Waxhaw Presbyterian Church. 

  • A group of Dabney family members from across the state met in late October to preview plans for a new book, “The Dabneys of South Carolina,” to be published in early 2014.

    The event was hosted by Doris Faye Vinson at her home in Camden. 

  •  Amanda Harris

    For The Lancaster News

    Handmade jewelry, woodcraft and much more will line the tables as local vendors provide the perfect opportunity for residents to get a head start on their Christmas shopping while supporting a good cause.

    The Lancaster Woman’s Club Mistletoe Market is 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 16, at Covenant Baptist Church,165 Craig Manor Road.

  • What began as a recreational sport has turned into a profession sport for Indian Land resident Ricky Wysocki.

    Wysocki, 20, is now ranked No. 2 in the world by the Professional Disc Golf Association.

    Disc golf is a popular sport that replaces a golf ball with a Frisbee and a hole in the ground with a chain basket on a post.

    Otherwise, the same rules apply as in golf.
    Wysocki recently participated in the U.S. Disc Golf Championship, held
    Oct. 2-5 at Winthrop University in Rock Hill.

    He tied for 24th out of 60 competitors in the open flight, with scores of 62, 67, 62 and 65.

  • Michele Roberts
    For Carolina Gateway
    INDIAN LAND – An Indian Land family has made a bike ride for charity a family tradition, with three generations riding together in the annual Bike MS: PGA Tour 150K Cycle to the Shore bike ride, held Sept. 28-29 in Florida.
    Ricky Montgomery, 44, has participated in the ride six times.
    His father, David Montgomery, 74, has ridden in the event for 15 years.

  • Staff Reports
    Two Lancaster County Sheriff’s deputies traveled to Albuquerque, N.M., to compete in the National Police Shooting Championships Sept. 13-17.
    The NPSC is an annual event held in Albuquerque and features about 300 law enforcement officers from all over the country and several from foreign countries. The NPSC is comprised of a multitude of different shooting events. Competitors choose which events they participate in.