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Today's Opinions

  • Column: False choices limit the path to real change

    Neil Robinson is a man who should be listened to.
    He is an eminent Charleston attorney with a prestigious statewide law firm. He is respected by his peers and community. With his head full of white hair, his well-tailored suits and his air of quiet confidence, he has a distinguished and slightly imposing bearing.
    But none of this is why we should all listen to him.

  • Letter: No matter what Trump says, critics will ridicule him

    Athena Redmond’s column in the Aug. 18 paper is just more of the left’s trash thrown at President Trump because they can’t get over their corrupt, perjuring candidate losing the election.
    The “Unite the Right” protest in Charlottesville had a permit, but the leftist Antifa didn’t. They and other leftists, along with the racist white supremacists, caused the melee that ensued. The police failed to do their job as well.
    President Trump blamed all, and he was correct in doing so.

  • Letter: Why can we no longer just ‘agree to disagree’?

    Our president was correct in condemning hatred coming from all sides.
    No violent acts should be condoned toward anyone for their beliefs. We all have the right to peaceful assembly under our Constitution. Freedom of speech is an inherent right to all.
    Equal rights means equal rights for all. Not just one side of the coin. We may not agree with the other side, but they do have the right to express their opinion, as long as it is done with no disruption toward anyone’s normal paths of travel or business hours.

  • Column: 2nd graders turn tables on reporter

    I park in the fire lane and pull out my equipment at Indian Land Elementary.

    There’s no rush for this story, but I’m always in a rush. It’s just my nature. I like to work quickly, but accurately.

    I walk into an elementary school – the kind of school I frequent to film my Facebook videos.

    Hauling in my posse – tripod, camera, microphone and notes – I check in at the front and get directions to the classroom.

    Second grade. The what-will-they-say-next age.

  • Column: Why Confederate monuments should stay

    Go to Lancaster’s Historic Courthouse and stand beneath the Confederate monument out front.
    This stately monument was unveiled June 4, 1909. It is one of the 52 such monuments that stand entrusted to our care in South Carolina.
    Better yet, go to the state Capitol grounds in Columbia and read the inscription on the monument there. It was erected by the organization Women of South Carolina to commemorate the Confederate soldiers. The inscription reads, in part:

    Let the South Carolinian
    Of another generation
    Remember

  • Column: Why Confederate monuments should stay

    Go to Lancaster’s Historic Courthouse and stand beneath the Confederate monument out front.
    This stately monument was unveiled June 4, 1909. It is one of the 52 such monuments that stand entrusted to our care in South Carolina.
    Better yet, go to the state Capitol grounds in Columbia and read the inscription on the monument there. It was erected by the organization Women of South Carolina to commemorate the Confederate soldiers. The inscription reads, in part:

    Let the South Carolinian
    Of another generation
    Remember

  • Column: Why Confederate monuments should stay

    Go to Lancaster’s Historic Courthouse and stand beneath the Confederate monument out front.
    This stately monument was unveiled June 4, 1909. It is one of the 52 such monuments that stand entrusted to our care in South Carolina.
    Better yet, go to the state Capitol grounds in Columbia and read the inscription on the monument there. It was erected by the organization Women of South Carolina to commemorate the Confederate soldiers. The inscription reads, in part:

    Let the South Carolinian
    Of another generation
    Remember

  • Column: Why Confederate monuments should stay

    Go to Lancaster’s Historic Courthouse and stand beneath the Confederate monument out front.
    This stately monument was unveiled June 4, 1909. It is one of the 52 such monuments that stand entrusted to our care in South Carolina.
    Better yet, go to the state Capitol grounds in Columbia and read the inscription on the monument there. It was erected by the organization Women of South Carolina to commemorate the Confederate soldiers. The inscription reads, in part:

    Let the South Carolinian
    Of another generation
    Remember