Today's Opinions

  • Forests, timberlands need fair tax policies

    It’s easy to take South Carolina’s forests for granted. They cover two-thirds of the total area of the state, and the forest industry is an economic engine that brings $17.4 billion to South Carolina each year.

    The benefits of our working forests stretch well beyond rural jobs and the economy. They contribute to our quality of life through clean air and water, wildlife habitat and recreational opportunities.

  • USCL ready for new year

    According to the tenets of our general education goals, the University of South Carolina Lancaster “seeks to make education accessible, affordable and convenient; encourages teaching innovation and adaptation; encourages participatory student learning; provides a supportive educational climate that actively and positively addresses intellectual and cultural diversity; and responds affirmatively to the needs of its students.”

  • Both Tarzan yells, probation at the farm

    Even though Fat Boy and Slick Willie had taken a hard tumble at the Tarzan vines, they were determined to get a ride on the vines and get their hands on me, as well.

    Willie was unable to shake off his groin injury, but agreed to hang in there to save face. I gave the duo of “Dumb and Dumber” instructions to go upstream 200 yards to a crossing that would lead them on a trail along a ridge to the vine location.

  • Council’s actions are costing the county

    Mechthild (Maggie) Bowers

  • County Council on witch hunt

    According to Viola C. Floyd’s 1968 book, “Lancaster County S.C. Tours,” one of Lancaster’s claim to shame – my opinion, not hers –  occurred in 1813 when “what may have been the last case tried in America where any testimony involving witchcraft was admitted in court,” took place.
     This case stood the test of time until the Charlene McGriff/Larry Honeycutt/Lancaster County Council witch hunt of Keith Tunnell and the Lancaster County Economic Development Corp. finally came to a close in 2015.

  • Homebuilders shorting school district on fees

    I keep reading about all the approved homes being built in Indian Land and the paltry amount of $500 per home being paid by the major homebuilders to the school district.
    In other areas, homebuilders are paying 10 times that amount to the school districts – yes, $5,000.
    When is Lancaster County Council going to  come to the realization that our schools are being short-changed?
    I strongly suggest that council press the builders to reveal the amounts they are paying to other districts.

  • Duke Energy digging upsets resident

    This is an open letter to Duke Energy and to let people know what they have done.
    I live in Indian Land in a horse community. My one-acre horse lot is next to my home.
    On Aug. 3, while I was away, Duke Energy came on to my property with a backhoe into my horse pasture with my two horses and dug.
    They broke the water line that went to my barn.
    I received no notification they were coming or that they needed access to my property.

  • County reframing economic development

    Nearly 30 years ago, county leaders gathered to create an entity to assist county government in its mission of developing the economic climate of Lancaster County.

    This organization became the Lancaster County Economic Development Corp. and exists as a SOl-c4 nonprofit agency. The structure has undergone modification over the years, migrating from private control to county governance and back to private control.