.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Opinions

  • Letter: Need more IL representation

    Three years ago, Indian Land resident Jerry Holt ran for county probate judge, barely losing to a long-time incumbent from Lancaster.
    While Jerry’s candidacy was one of the few times an Indian Land resident has run for a courthouse office, election results show Indian Land residents failed to unite behind Jerry in that race.
    Do you think that sent a message to the current “good ol’ boy” leadership of the Lancaster County Council about how Indian Land residents won’t stand together and work to shake things up in county government?

  • Column: I fought these 3 lousy ideas in legislature

    Now that the legislative session is over, I wanted to do something a little different and tell you about some legislation before the General Assembly that I did not support this year.
    A friend and fellow lawmaker shared the advice that the job of a legislator is 60 percent constituency work, 30 percent stopping bad legislation from happening and 10 percent passing good legislation. During my first year in the House, I have tried to model my time and effort around those three things.
    Here are three bills that I did not support and why.

  • Column: My plan to restore American Dream

    Phil Noble’s July 30 column asked: Is the American Dream alive or dead?
    Mr. Noble is an expert at identifying problems. His usual solution is more state money.
    His piece offered no solution to the lost American Dream. Democrats have no solutions to problems today that actually work.
    He said there are two South Carolinas, with great divisions of poverty, racism, isolation, hostility, violence and bloodshed between them. This is true for many states and cities in America, not just South Carolina.

  • Column: Ratcheting up legal sanctions on gun violence

    I know my community expects harsher sentences in gun cases. Sometimes we expect more than the law allows.

    Clint Eastwood said, “A man has got to know his limitations.” I know the limitations of the current gun laws in South Carolina, and unfortunately they are not in our favor.

  • Column: A big nuke-plant mess to unbuild

    The announcement last week that SCE&G and state-owned utility Santee Cooper were pulling the plug on construction of two nuclear reactors in Jenkinsville has left questions that keep multiplying.

    In the run-up to the decision, one factor driving it was that the partly-completed, multibillion-dollar project would provide more power than electricity consumers in South Carolina were likely to want.

    Canceling the project, though, could lead to a shortfall.

  • Letter: Jerell White’s family thanks the community

    Editor’s note: Jerell White, a Benedict College student home on summer break, disappeared after walking away from a party in the Primus community early July 5. His body was found in a nearby pond after a four-day search.


    The family of Jerell Ketron Eugene White would like to thank everyone who has shown support throughout this process.

    There are really no words to express our heartfelt thanks for the sympathy and support everyone has extended toward our family during this time of loss.

  • Column: Will mammals soon choose to be reptiles?

    Suppose you do not believe in God, or in any god at all.
    Maybe you believe the universe and everything in it, including yourself, resulted from pure chance or maybe a serious accident of nature. Maybe you believe that everything is utterly devoid of meaning. It is all your choice.

  • Column: GOP says Probate backlog alarming

    Three years ago, Lancaster County Republicans, seeking to improve the level of service in county government, fielded a candidate for probate judge.
    Jerry Holt lost in a close race to a two-decade Democratic incumbent. Holt challenged the status quo in the probate court, calling for reforms in the office to improve service, make the office more customer-friendly and prepare for the county’s continued growth.
    According to recent court statistics, these reforms are needed now more than ever.