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Today's Opinions

  • Column: Mrs. Blackmon, don’t complain when TLN reports what you say

    This is in response to Linda Blackmon’s letter to the editor in Sunday’s paper.
    Mrs. Blackmon, I would like to point out that The Lancaster News has written exactly what you have said since this election protest started a year ago. Nothing is one-sided.
    Sometimes common sense flies out the window. A lot of us wonder why you thought you could just vote to make yourself $6,750 richer. It makes no sense. You should have asked City Attorney Mitch Norrell before you voted.

  • Letter: Road hazard still not addressed

    The safety hazard on Harrisburg Road – the iron plate stretching from white line to white line – that was reported to SCDOT on Oct. 6 and was the topic of a letter in The Lancaster News on Oct. 16, remains.
    Yes, the iron plate that has the potential to cause a wreck is still in place. If SCDOT has looked into this matter, I have yet to see an action that occurred. I do understand that this is the action of a contractor, but the road belongs to SCDOT, seeing as how this is in Lancaster County.

  • Letter: Festival displaces band on football field

    The Indian Land High School marching band went to its state competition Saturday and were not allowed to go to another facility to practice. (Because of the Indian Land Fall Festival,) they had to practice earlier in the day, and then sit in a band room for a couple of hours and watch movies prior to their 3:15 p.m. trip to Columbia for a 6:45 p.m. performance.  

  • Letter: We don’t need more stores and traffic

    I love my town of Indian Land because it was not built up. We had trees, deer, animals – nice and quiet.
    Now it is changing because these damn builders are money-hungry. Why are they ripping up the beautiful trees to build more terrible stores when you just need to drive up the road and there is plenty of shopping? Why clutter Indian Land? Traffic we do not need.   
    They already did a poor job building homes in Indian Land, now they want to destroy the land, too. Not one tree left.  

  • Letter: Blackmon: One-sided coverage of me discredits this newspaper

    I am a firm believer in a free press, but the press, even in a small-town newspaper, has a duty to cover both sides of a story and print the truth.
    I was contacted by many of my supporters and other citizens of Lancaster after Sunday’s editorial concerning my vote and a possible charge of an ethics violation. I would like to set the record straight.
    As for my Oct. 10 vote to approve back pay for my position as the legally elected city council member, let me explain what occurred.

  • Editor's Column: 2 bizarre weeks in a bewildering political career

    On Monday, Oct. 16, Linda Blackmon called this newspaper and asked to speak to Publisher Susan Rowell, my boss. It was the morning after my column about the new Lancaster City Council member taking a vote that clearly violated state ethics law.
    Susan wasn’t in, so Blackmon asked to speak to me. When I answered, she identified herself cordially and said she wanted to come by the newspaper later that day to talk to me and reporter Mark Manicone, who had been writing news articles about her.
    Fine, I said. When would you like to come?

  • Commentary: Mulvaney talks about his bailiwick: budget, taxes

    Editor’s note: Mick Mulvaney, the White House budget director and former congressman from Indian Land, appeared on CBS News’ “Face the Nation” Sunday to discuss the Republicans’ budget, which had just passed the Senate, and the president’s tax-reform plans. Here are excerpts of his discussion with host John Dickerson.

  • Column: 6 questions for gubernatorial candidates

    The S.C. General Assembly is far different than 27 years ago when Operation Lost Trust blew open the cozy culture of the State House with federal charges against 28 legislators and lobbyists in a cash-for-votes sting.
    People went to jail. Some avoided it. Ethics rules were changed to become some of the toughest in the nation as it became virtually impossible for people to buy a cup of coffee legally for a friend in the legislature.