Today's Opinions

  • Louis needs to stand up for his beliefs

    I would like to thank Jensan Louis, "Anti-cockfighters seek to take away rights" in the Feb. 17 edition of The Lancaster News, for bringing up some good points and pointing out how God still had a place 200 years ago. God has a place right here and now and creatures of all kinds belong to him. It is our place to make sure they are cared for. That is exactly what I intend to keep doing.

  • Water, Sewer District plays no favorites

    At first read, I felt compelled to jump on the flap wagon protesting the cost of water service from Lancaster County Water and Sewer District.

    For years my monthly bill was much higher than my immediate neighbors. I complained. I got nowhere. Insult came with injury when a goodly portion of my front yard was surrendered to the utilities for water, natural gas and communication services. I hoped my neighbors would understand my sacrifice to their well being.

  • Waxhaws Chapter, DAR kept focus on history in county

    I am sad that it has come to my attention that the Waxhaws Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, has experienced "automatic disbandment" from the National Society.

    Waxhaws Chapter was organized in 1941 with Mrs. E. Lee Skipper as organizing regent.

    Another regent, Mrs. Ben C. Hough Sr., was largely responsible for the establishment of Andrew Jackson State Park.

    Many of the historic markers in Lancaster County are the result of work by the members.

    Constitution Park at the corner of Main Street and Woodland Drive was dedicated by Waxhaws Chapter.

  • Researcher looking for cemetery information

    I have become aware that there are many cemeteries hidden throughout Lancaster County that are more or less unknown.

    Small cemeteries such as the Baskins Cemetery in Rich Hill and others can provide a wealth of information to researchers with an interest in the folks buried in a family plot or a private cemetery.

    I suspect there are many such cemeteries. You may have stumbled across one in an obscure area or deep in the woods.

  • Keep rescue squad donations here

    Well, it's happened again. Despite Indian Land residents now having a different ZIP code than our counterparts across the creek, Fort Mill's Rescue Squad is still hitting us up for donations.

    And it's no wonder Lanny Bernard, director of Lancaster County Emergency Medical Services, is seeing red over the issue.

    Bernard has repeatedly asked Mark Garrick, captain of Fort Mill's Rescue Squad, to stop soliciting from Indian Land residents, whom Fort Mill's squad do not serve, except as a rarely used backup.

  • We are responsible for treatment of animals

    We are responsible for treatment of animals

    This is in response to Louis Jensan's letter, "Anti-cockfighters seek to take away rights," in the Feb. 17 edition of The Lancaster News. His letter once again makes our county and state look like the guffaw hillbillies that just won't die.

  • You can make a difference in the life of abused child

    February is Black History Month, a time for us to celebrate the contributions of African Americans throughout our history.

    Many pivotal African Americans have exemplified through their lives the power of advocacy and volunteerism, from Frederick Douglass to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Black History Month is a time to reflect on how we can help change the lives of others less fortunate by speaking out on their behalf.

    Everyone can be great because everyone can serve, King said.

  • Land trust benefits us all

    When you look at a map of the Heritage Tract, you see slivers of property cut out on both sides of the Catawba River in Lancaster and Chester counties and dipping into Fairfield County. The state of South Carolina bought the 1,540-acre tract last fall for $5.4 million.

    The Katawba Valley Land Trust bought 200 acres in the same vicinity from Crescent Resources earlier this year. The nonprofit land trust has received donated conservation easements from Crescent for 161 acres with water frontage on Fishing Creek in Chester County and Camp Creek in Lancaster County.