.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Opinions

  • A stench, a scalpel, an eyeball

    Editor’s note: This occasional column takes you behind the scenes with Hannah Strong, who has been reporting for a little more than a year.

    That sea-animal stench smacks me in the face when I walk through the door at Buford Elementary.
    I know what I’m getting into when I decide to film it.
    The smell gets stronger the closer I get to the classroom – the classroom with the dead, 2-foot-long dogfish sharks on the table.

  • A bumpy ride, a shooting and 17 shell casings

    Editor’s note: This occasional column takes you behind the scenes with Hannah Strong, who has been reporting for a little more than a year.

    I didn’t know what we were about to walk up to.
    I knew I had my camera bag. That my adrenaline was rushing. The White Street construction made the road bumpy. And my fellow reporter Greg Summers’ manual-transmission truck was shifting us back and forth as we sped down the road.
    We knew we were headed toward a shooting – thanks to the newsroom police scanner for the tip.

  • Families endure a pain that will never go away

    Editor’s note: Hannah Strong joined us a year ago, fresh out of Winthrop. Today she begins an occasional column on what her first reporting job is teaching her about herself, her profession and Lancaster County.

    The operator from an S.C. prison says, “You have 15 seconds left on this call.”
    “Let me call you right back,” the woman tells me.
    She has been jailed for attempted armed robbery  since 2013.
    I’m talking to her because her 19-year-old son has been shot dead in Lancaster.

  • Column: DOT embarks on 10-year plan to rebuild roads

    SCDOT has mapped out a decade-long plan designed to rebuild decayed roads and replace structurally deficient bridges all across the state.
    The foundation of this mission began last Saturday, July 1, when the roads bill passed by the General Assembly became law.
    The state’s gasoline tax, currently one of the lowest in the nation, is increasing for the first time since 1987. The initial increase is 2 cents a gallon, and the tax will increase by another 2 cents each year for a total of 12 cents at the end of a six-year period.

  • Column: Enough with the political theater!

    Political theater – that is all we have in Washington these days.
    A number of Democrats have begun raising the possibility of removing President Trump from office for mental incapacity.
    Among these members of Congress is a Georgia representative who once asked in a House hearing if the military was worried that putting too many soldiers on a Pacific island might cause it to tip over and capsize.
    Another holds rallies chanting “Impeach 45,” citing no legal reason.

  • Column: I-73: One giant step forward, same old error

    When it comes to spending and infrastructure, one of South Carolina’s great white whales rose from the deep with news in late June that the Army Corps of Engineers approved a permit to begin work on the South Carolina leg of Interstate 73. Ultimately, the highway could take motorists from Michigan’s Upper Peninsula straight down to Myrtle Beach.

    The permit covers the whole state length, slicing across its northeastern corner, starting near Bennettsville. Construction could begin within two years, supporters say, on a project first contemplated in 1982.

  • Column: S.C. needs to stand up for women

    It has always been a source of great bewilderment to me the huge hypocritical gulf between how we as Southern men talk about women – and how we treat them.
    Our historic culture is that we put women on a pedestal, we dress them in hoop skirts, we praise the Scarlet O’Hara strong-women types, are chivalrous defenders of the virtues of Southern womanhood, always looking to help a fair damsel in distress – and on and on.

  • Column: DOT Commission: Go. Just go.

    As of July 1, Gov. Henry McMaster has the power to fire any or all of the Department of Transportation’s commissioners. It was a DOT-reform element in the gas-tax bill that was passed this year.
    The commission has been responsible all along for the condition of the roads. Ultimately, it decides what to fix and when, how to do it, and how to spend money allocated by the General Assembly.
    While the gas-tax bill didn’t fix everything, it did give us clearer lines of accountability – if we will use them.