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Today's Opinions

  • Watson letter: Help celebrate Law Day

    Friday, May 1, is Law Day.
    In 1958, President Dwight Eisenhower established Law Day to mark our nation’s commitment to the rule of law, a principle that sets us apart from many other countries around the world. Its designation underscores how law and the legal process have contributed to the freedoms that all Americans share.

  • Evans letter: Begging for jobs ain’t easy

    Here we go again!  
    Isn’t it true that Lancaster County Economic Development Corp. President Keith Tunnell and his group of people have brought new business to Lancaster County? According to newspaper coverage, there seem to be a couple of Lancaster County Council members usually up in arms with the Economic Development folks.
    As I recall, that Alliance 77 snafu involved groups across the river who were at odds with us. Come on now, does anyone seriously believe counties bordering Interstate 77 are really gonna help sway business to Lancaster?

  • Hopkins letter: Fascism alive and well in U.S.

    The left loves to brand conservatives as fascists, yet in reality, in which the left doesn’t live, they are the fascists.
    To understand this, draw a horizontal line on a paper. In the middle of that line draw a vertical line. That second line represents the middle between left and right (liberal and conservative).
    Now starting from the middle line, go right about a third of the way and draw another vertical line. That line represents the Constitution.
    If you went all the way to the right, that would be anarchy – no laws, anything goes.

  • Burwell column: Minority Health Month: Making progress on health disparities

    Half a century ago, our nation was in the midst of a civil rights revolution.
    Over these last few years, we’ve reached several milestones: the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act, the Voting Rights Act, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s transformative “I Have a Dream” speech and the historic march from Selma to Montgomery.
    As we commemorate these events, we feel the weight of their expectations. We see the path that has moved us closer to justice and equality, but we also see the stumbling blocks and shortcomings along the way.

  • Payne letter: Where is the church on Wednesday ballgames?

    Currently, there is controversy involving the Lancaster County Parks and Recreation Department and its scheduling of youth recreation ballgames on Wednesday nights.
    Some parents are concerned that their children feel they are not only letting their teammates and coaches down by not participating on Wednesdays, but feel like they are being punished by not getting to play as often as others because their parents take them to church services and activities on Wednesday nights.

  • Ardrey: Lancaster County needs sawmill

    I am concerned about Larry McCullough’s attempt at deception concerning the rezoning of the tract on Riverside Road.
    Mr. McCullough is attempting to equate a sawmill with a landfill. Several times he refers to this project as similar to the rezoning attempt to locate a landfill in Flat Creek, even claiming that the project is beginning to smell.

  • Noble column: S.C. Democrats applaud O’Malley

    Democrats in South Carolina are not a group that is easily impressed, but recently former Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley really impressed them, as in a standing-ovation impressed.
    All the national pundits and so-called experts who are saying that Hillary Clinton has it all wrapped up should take note, because it just ain’t so – at least not in South Carolina.

  • Yow column: S.C. House passes bill to fix roads

    On April 15, the S.C. House passed a bill, H. 3579, by an overwhelming vote of 87-20.
    It is designed to address the poor condition of our roads, which is arguably the most pressing problem our state as a whole faces. S.C. House members understand the seriousness of the problem and the House Ways and Means Committee members have worked overtime to create a bill that will, for the first time in decades, get us back on track.
    Care has been taken to reduce the income tax so that, for the average citizen, this will be a revenue-neutral event.