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Today's Opinions

  • Help police find who set the fires

    When I turned on the TV and saw our beautiful county courthouse on fire, I thought I was watching Detroit burn like we’ve seen in the past when people get angry at the justice system or law enforcement. But I never thought I’d see that here. The arsonist cannot be from here. Our community has too much pride and love for our town and community.

  • 'I do not have the power to rule city government'

    I would like to respond to Nancy Jones’ letter “Book sense great, but experience gets job done” in the Aug. 17 edition of The Lancaster News. Jones was referring to a letter written by Shemika Caldwell. Caldwell said education was more important than work experience and cited the city’s administrator position as an example.

    In that same edition was a picture of my graduating class from the Annie Mae Dream Center program. There were students and instructors in the class. The instructors were identified as students. Caldwell was one of my instructors.

  • Courthouse situation could have been worse

    Lancaster County Courthouse holds a lot of memories for a lot of people. But if someone could get in there that easy, what would have kept a terrorist from entering and putting a bomb in there and blowing it up during court and killing a lot of people. Someone had a lot of nerve.

    Security should have been better, even a guard could have been posted.

    A lot of lives could have been lost if a terrorist had gotten in and planted a bomb.

  • Mr. Jack never met a stranger

    I just returned from out-of-town, to learn that Jack Harper passed away Saturday night.

    So much of Lancaster’s commercial district has disappeared and unfortunately, those who were so vital, are now passing from the scene also.

    Jack was a life long friend who, at one time, operated a shoe store at Lancaster Square.

    Prior to that, he was with Bailey-Rowell on Main Street. Jack outfitted many children and probably dyed more wedding shoes than anyone else. He was a fixture in the uptown business community.

  • Decide: Politician or public servant

    In his letter to the editor he spewed accolades about the mayoral candidate he was supporting. It was an impressive letter – neatly typed, well-written and punctuated correctly.

    And while there have been so many advancements in the field of genetics I had a problem believing the 6-month-old had written the letter. Not that I doubted his intelligence, it’s just that I had a problem visualizing his little fingers pounding away at a computer’s keyboard.

    Yes, campaigning for the previous election was in full swing.

  • Donnie Threatt lived his faith

    Several weeks ago, a great man who loved his Lord and Savior was taken too quickly from his family and friends. Life as well as death must come eventually to all. It is what we do during those gaps in time that matter the most. I would like to share some things about Donnie Threatt that I will always remember. I want to also share some things that I learned about Donnie after his passing.

  • 'Book sense great, but experience gets job done'

    I would like to respond to Shemika Caldwell’s letter “Writer: Education more important than work experience,” in the Aug. 13 edition of The Lancaster News.

    Let me say from someone with both education and work experience, I simply don’t agree. Miss Caldwell’s perspective has nothing to do with education or experience. Her letter itself and in her own words reveal her views are from a discriminating mindset and of personal bias.

  • Do all we can to replace courthouse

    The buildings and parcels of land on Main Street tell the story of early life here in Lancaster. What the people of Lancaster already understand is that when you tear up, knock down, burn and change the landscape, you are tearing up the future as well.ee

    The courthouse is on the Historic Register. It is part and parcel of Lancaster history. When you tear the fabric of a city’s past, you tear out the souls of its citizens as well. When the people can no longer can feel the soul of the city then they go elsewhere. That is the greatest loss a city can have.