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Today's Opinions

  • Guess whose budget didn't get cut this year?

    If I told you that, in a year when most state agencies saw cuts of 30, 40 or even 50 percent, there was one agency that got almost a 50 percent increase, would that strike you as being, well, wrong?

    It certainly struck me that way. And last week I voted to sustain S.C. Gov. Mark Sanford’s veto of that expenditure.  But not enough other senators agreed and that funding increase was approved.

    What agency got that extra money this year? The South Carolina Senate.

    Here is how it happened:

  • Celebrate freedom today

    Happy Birthday, America! This year, there will be 234 candles on your red, white and blue cake.

    We celebrate our freedom going back to July 4, 1776.

    That’s the day our young nation adopted the Declaration of Independence, which declared our independence from Great Britain.

    During the American Revolution, the legal separation of the American colonies from Great Britain occurred on July 2, 1776, when the Second Continental Congress voted to approve a resolution of independence proposed in June by Richard Henry Lee of Virginia.

  • Challenges continue on right to bear arms

    So, what does last week’s ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court on handguns mean? Legal experts on both sides of the gun control debate predict it will mean more challenges to gun-control laws – challenges that might very well be decided in future Supreme Court rulings.

    The decision will also almost certainly void gun-control laws in Chicago and Oak Place, Ill., that forbid residents to have handguns in their homes.

  • Writer thanks Good Samaritan

    On July 2, I was shopping at Wal-Mart in Lancasster. After loading my items into my car, I left my purse in the shopping cart and drove away.

    Some kind person found my purse and turned it in to the staff in the store. I would like to thank that person. I have tried to find out who you are, but have been unsuccessful. I want you to know that your kindness and honesty have not gone unnoticed.

    With all the bad news that is reported, I think it is time we stop and give thanks for all the good people who are still in this world.

  • Writer: Old jail is not worth saving

    I read the editorial about saving the old Lancaster County jail. I do not believe it needs to be restored because it is useless to the public. How many people have come to look at it?

    Everything old is not historic. We now have an old courthouse that probably no one will go in. There are old jails in every town. That does not make them unique. It is not like everyone who has been there has such good memories.

    The editorial mentioned Robert Mills, the architect who designed the jail. I have never heard of him. Now, if he was Frank Lloyd Wright, that would be different.

  • Writer expands on two issues in newspaper

    There were two articles in the Wednesday edition of The Lancaster News that caused me concern and that require strong comment and rebuttal.

    On page 4A, there is a human interest story about a flag being damaged that I thought unfairly characterized the reputation of Renee Bozeman, who reported that her American flag had been vandalized.

  • Old Barr Street school gets new life

    The building, which once was the home of Barr Street High School and Barr Street Junior High School, sports new life.

    The building, which for the most part has seen little or no activity since 2003, has been renewed through the work of Hope on the Hill, a local group led by the Rev. Wayne Murray to boost opportunities for youth.

    Plans called for the renovated facility to open in late June, but the opening is now set for Saturday due to complications with the alarm system.

  • We should preserve old jail

    I am delighted that The Lancaster News reported July 2, 2010, that there was strong support to save the old jail.

    The price to rehabilitate the jail seems reasonable. This building has stood since 1823, about 200 years. That proves how well it was originally constructed. The structure is designated as a National Historic Landmark.