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Today's Opinions

  • Jonathan Cook, a true hero

    “A true American hero.” That’s how Jim Moreland describes Jonathan Cook, a longtime Kershaw resident who is immensely respected and endeared by people who know him. Some people might describe Cook as a disabled Vietnam veteran. It’s an accurate description in the sense that Cook didn’t come back from Vietnam as the man he was when he got there in the mid-1960s.

  • Shoppers should Think Lancaster First this holiday season

    With Christmas lights up and a bevy of area holiday parades this weekend, it’s definitely starting to look and even feel, with the recent dip in temperatures, like Christmas here in Lancaster County.
    Now that the holiday shopping season is in full swing, we’d like to remind shoppers to Think Lancaster First.
    The Lancaster County Chamber of Commerce’s shop local initiative is also in full swing, with 44 local businesses taking part in the Think Lancaster First effort.

  • Writer praises McGriff for her stance

    Lancaster County Councilwoman Charlene McGriff brings a breath of fresh air to county government. Betcha the folks looking for work have found someone in local government who is concerned about their welfare. 
    Councilwoman McGriff questioned a government program (One Stop),  which apparently operates on its own behalf, giving very little help to those who need it.
    Funny, in a way, how other council members immediately jumped on the bandwagon to show their concern once the cat was out of the bag.

  • What kind of IL fire department do you want?

    This column is in response to J.R. Wilt’s recent comments on the Indian Land Fire Protection District.
    I take issue with Mr. Wilt’s assertion that firefighting is a part-time occupation. With the amount of training and time required to maintain certifications and the difficulty of recruiting volunteers, firefighting is becoming a full-time paid occupation.

  • Education voters have spoken, who will listen?

    The numbers are shocking – 110,000 students trapped in persistently failing schools, 30,000 students per high school class fail to graduate on time, 87 public high schools identified as “dropout factories,” $12,200 per student in spending and a mere 44 cents per educational dollar directed to the classroom.
    The numbers, and the students that comprise them, are becoming well known. It makes sense that education voters across the state made their frustration clear in November.

  • Buford Jackets have plenty to cheer about

    The 2010 high school cheer competition season ended where the Buford High School squad wanted to be, but not the way the BHS girls wanted to finish.
    The Yellow Jackets team placed 13th out of 14 teams in the state championship cheer competition held at the Bi-Lo Center in Greenville last month.
    Buford High, the Conference IV-AA cheer champion, entered the state finals as the Lower State champion, its second in four years.

  • Private schools are good for the public

    Public education and public schools are not one and the same. Public education is an educated public. It is a public commitment to education, the public support of education and the public benefits derived from education.
    Public schools were created to achieve those goals; some do, others don’t. But any school that successfully pursues those aims and equips young people with the social, economic and civic tools they need for success is serving a primarily public purpose.

  • Bigger reservoir a no-brainer

    Water is something we often take for granted. That’s easy to do because it appears we have plenty on our planet. The Earth is more than 70 percent water. But only about 1 to 3 percent of the Earth’s water is suitable for consumption.
    When we experience droughts like those of the past decade, we realize just how valuable water is to our lives. We’ve become accustomed to water restrictions as drought stages progress. No watering lawns, washing cars or buildings.