.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Opinions

  • Pressley’s issue shows need for public attention

    Just when Lancaster County residents thought the specter of
     trash mountains was laid to rest, at least for awhile, another reared its head in the middle of Indian Land.
    A growing mountain of trash at Pressley’s Recycling Center Inc., was discovered in late October, after a very public battle over the proposed “Project December” landfill in southern Lancaster County and the fear that the Foxhole construction and demolition debris landfill just north of the state line would begin accepting household waste last year.

  • You learn something new every day

    I don’t have a clue as to who Ray LeBlond is (or was for that matter), but he said something I can identify with.
    LeBlond is credited with the quotation, “You learn something every day if you pay attention.”
    So true, so true.
    Take this little jewel of knowledge I stumbled across this past weekend. After buying a bag of ice, I read the label. At the bottom of the bag, it said, “made from filtered water.”

  • Don’t forget to go vote in primary

    On Tuesday, June 12, registered voters across the state will be able to exercise one of the most precious privileges democracy grants us – the opportunity to determine who will represent them in their government.
    In Lancaster County, there are only two races on the ballot – Republicans vying for the Lancaster County Council District 3 seat and the newly created District 7 seat in Indian Land.

  • Banning bath salts intensifies illegal activity

    Methylenedioxypyrovalerone, commonly referred to as “bath salts,” is a dangerous synthetic drug that causes drug-induced psychosis. It has been linked to the May 26 assault in Miami where Rudy Eugene, who had stripped naked after overheating on the drug, ate the face off of Ronald Poppo, a homeless man known to be insane.
    Eugene continued his assault even after being shot by a law enforcement officer who was flagged down by a witness. He was subsequently shot and killed.

  • It is past time for citizens to take back Lancaster County

    Lancaster County Council tabled the proposed B-3 ordinance at its May 21 meeting with comments from council members Charlene McGriff and Kathy Sistare that they “would not be stampeded into doing anything.”
    These comments seem to have been triggered by a flood of e-mails from the public expressing frustration at the refusal of council to allow the B-3 ordinance on the agenda for the May 14 meeting.

  • Bundy ready to apply work ethic to council

    On Tuesday, June 12, the people of District 3 will go the polls to vote for their representative on County Council. In making this decision, they need to weigh out who is best able to analyze the complex issues coming before council, who is best able to manage the county’s budget needs and, ultimately, who will best serve as the representative of the entire District 3.
    I am running to be the person who represents District 3 on Lancaster County Council and would appreciate your support and your vote next Tuesday.

  • Kersey’s roots run deep in District 3

    It would be a great honor to serve as county councilman for Lancaster County District 3. My roots run deep in District 3. My grandmother, Levy Watts, was born in Oak Hill and my grandfather, Dwight Thompson Wright, was born and raised in Tradesville.
    My ancestors had a farm in the Oak Hill community for more than 100 years. My wife and I own that very farm today.
    During my four years on council (2005-2008):

  • Senate makes progress during spring session

    So far, this session of the S.C. General Assembly has been productive. I’m pleased with the progress that has been made on several fronts, including improving the structure of state government. Listed below are some issues, both large and small, that we have been addressing.
    Crush and run
    If you own an old car and it is stolen, chances are it’s heading to a scrap yard. Nine out of 10 cars stolen in South Carolina are eight years old or older. They can be sold to scrap dealers without proof of ownership.