Today's Opinions

  • Continental Tire deserves a thank you

    The great thing about being in the newspaper business is that we often learn of good news before most others do.

    Last week, we were wowed by the news that Continental Tire was making a sizable donation to two local government entities.

    The company, which moved its North American corporate headquarters from Charlotte to Indian Land last year, announced it was giving $65,000 worth of tires to Lancaster County and $35,000 to the Lancaster County School District.

  • Volunteers reason for successful fundraiser

    Calvin Miller doubted his faith just a little. Volunteers and organizers of the April 24 Family Promise yard sale were told if they raised $10,000, an anonymous donor would donate $10,000.

    The volunteers worked hard to organize the yard sale. Representatives from 15 churches met once a week for six weeks to plan the fundraiser.

    Miller, who is chairman of Family Promise, a network of local churches that provides homeless families with children food, shelter, clothing and counseling, was worried they couldn’t raise that much and thereby would lose that $10,000.

  • 3 officers recognized for DUI enforcement

    Booze it and lose it is a popular slogan in the campaign to reduce drunken driving in the Palmetto State. Three local law enforcement officers are doing their best in the ongoing fight to keep alcohol-impaired drivers off our state roads.

    The S.C. Department of Public Safety recently recognized two Lancaster Police Department officers, Pfc. Josh Small and Sgt. Dale Johnson, along with Sgt. Billy Hillton of the Lancaster County Sheriff’s Office.

  • Local EMS committed to saving our lives

    Talk about a twist of fate. In one edition of The Lancaster News, we printed a story about Lancaster County Emergency Medical Services winning a prestigious state award at its annual meeting in Myrtle Beach.

    In that article, Lanny Bernard, EMS director, touted the accomplishments of his 52 full-time and 25 part-time employees who work hard to provide life-saving care to Lancaster County residents.

    Just days later in another article, Bernard was defending EMS response time to calls in the northern end of Lancaster County.

  • Don't sacrifice public safety for builder profits

    Recent news reports tell us that America’s confidence in government is at an all-time low, and here’s a good example of why. Given a choice between ensuring the safety of citizens and lining the pockets of the home building industry with profits, South Carolina may be on the verge of giving public safety the back seat.

  • Mother finds strength, faith

    Cora Jane Caston Wallace always wanted to be a writer. But that was not an option for her. In fact, she had to quit school because her parents needed her at home. The day her mother said she wasn’t going back to school, Wallace cried all night.

    Wallace later went to work for Springs Industries. She married Monroe Wallace and they had four children. Their youngest child, Suzanne, was diagnosed at an early age with a rare condition called congenital pseudoarthrosis.

  • Writer wants choice of electric providers

    Several years ago Andrew Smith wrote a letter, “Lynches River holds us hostage.” He described it just right. We who are on Lynches River are not able to chose our electric provider.

    We have no voice on anything. The rates are outrageous and need to be adjusted. We need an option of another electricity provider so can live like normal people.

    Shirley McGriff



  • Area flooding has worsened last 10 years

    I am a big girl, so let me refine what I am saying about flooding (in the Edenmoor area.)

    These longtime residents may not live near the ranch (Larkspur) and drive by it daily like I do. I have lived here for 10 years, passing it daily.

    The Hinsons say yes, it has always flooded some, but nothing like it does now and not as frequently or with as deep, running rapids as now.