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Today's Opinions

  • Big Thursday scholarships make impact on education

    Big Thursday of Lancaster Inc. brings together area University of South Carolina and Clemson supporters.
    When they leave, as strange as it may seem, both groups of backers are likely sporting smiles – toothy grins worth of a good day.
    The Big Thursday Scholarship Committee has produced plenty of big smiles over the last few years.
    The committee works to help county students who attend the University of South Carolina Lancaster and Clemson University.

  • Tidbits paint true picture of country

    My mother used to say, “No news means good news.” I have learned those words were not words of wisdom. No news means you are not aware of any bad news, which in turn means you are not living in the real world.
    As I listen to local and world news of late I have learned that most everyone’s frame of mind is affected by money or lack of it.
    Following are some of the tidbits that have caught my attention:

  • Americans have difficulty distinguishing what’s a lie

    The last true remnant of freedom in this United States is our right to vote. We send our fellow residents to faraway countries to die on the battlefield to stop the enemies of this republic, who would deny that right.
    We spend billions to support local, state and national governments that we trust will defend that right. Neighbors fall out with neighbors as the result of exercising that right. Cultural differences very often determine how we will execute that right.

  • Smith one constant in state titles

    John Smith never sets his sights on winning region titles or state championships. Rather, he simply aims for his team to get better. Somehow, though, his Great Falls Red Devils continue to win plenty of both.
    On March 3, Great Falls defeated Johnsonville for the Class A state title. Smith won another state title that he didn’t plan for or expect, even though he returned five of his top seven players from last year’s state title team, including the Class A Player of the Year.

  • Let sun shine in government

    It’s Sunshine Week, a week to promote open government.
    Since you are reading an editorial column in this newspaper, you likely care about what is going on in your community and with your government. This is a good thing and unfortunately not common enough.
    Let me encourage you to also care about open, transparent government on the local and state levels.
    Without open government, you don’t know how your tax dollars are spent, how your public bodies make decisions, or if our laws are being enforced efficiently and with equality.

  • Sheriff’s deputies rescue pet, opossum

    I want to thank Lancaster County Sheriff Office’s deputy Forrest Lawson and another unknown sheriff’s deputy for their help on Feb. 19. My dachshund was under the pool deck attached to an opossum and would not come out.
    Buffie barked for one and one-half hour alarming the neighborhood. The sheriff’s deputies came and rescued Buffie and the opossum from under the deck. I thank you so very much from the bottom of my heart. You were such a godsend.

    Barbara L. Roebuck
    Lancaster
     

  • GOP campaign is a circus

    Welcome, children of all ages. This year’s circus has and will continue to provide some of the most death-defying, unbelievable stunts, never before performed in the public arena.
    Keep your eyes on the center ring, as the starring act is changing more quickly than at any time in history. Each week brings a new set of clowns and new approaches to comedy than have ever been presented before.

  • Writer encourages voters to hear Payne’s views

    Since the beginning of our country, we have had a political system that has had its share of problems. Whether it was with race, age or sex, we have made it somewhat of a habit to exclude voters in the past.
    We have also had various fights about what exactly defines a voter, and how old one must be to vote. Since 1971, people gain their enfranchisement at the age of 18, and since then, younger voters have often misused this power.