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Today's Opinions

  • Letter: A nation of geniuses can’t figure stuff out

    I have come to the conclusion that there are too many “geniuses” in our society today. The word is used practically for everyone.
    Hollywood is filled with them. Just ask anyone who acts about their co-stars or directors and you get, “He’s a genius.” I’ve heard it for sports stars, politicians, artists, Wall Street workers, singers, etc. You name the category, and the title has been used.

  • Column: How to help Lancaster’s homeless

    People in our community continue to ask me how they can help with the homeless here. There’s so much you can do – from donations to volunteering to just offering respect – to make a homeless person’s life a little bit better.
    If you are one of the lucky ones, the world of a homeless person is completely foreign from your own. But without the support of friends and family, how many of us could survive something such as the loss of a spouse, a debilitating physical illness or the loss of employment?

  • Column: Roads, pensions, coyotes, mopeds, women’s toilets

    Is it better to accomplish lots of little things or a couple of major things? Legislators took the latter approach this year, concentrating on twin titanic issues – overhauling the state’s pension system and passing a plan to better fund and govern the state’s road system.
    What follows is a synopsis of  those two home runs along with a few singles and strike outs that occurred.

    Long and winding road

  • Column: ‘Fake news’ is out there, but not from journalists

    Fake news. It’s a phrase that became the most memorable takeaway from the 2016 election and the political hangover that still resonates today.
    It should come as no surprise that Oxford Dictionaries proclaimed the 2016 word of the year to be “post-truth,” an appropriate adjective for an era in which some news consumers are less concerned with whether or not something is true than they are with how it makes them feel.

  • Column: Volvo project shows pitfalls of job-luring tax incentives

    Since it secured the Volvo manufacturing plant in July 2015, the state has been celebrating its achievement with promises of stellar economic growth and thousands of jobs for the Berkeley County area.
    A spokesman for Berkeley County was asked if taxpayers would be feeling any effects from Berkeley’s multimillion-dollar investment. He responded, “I think the effect they’re going to feel is a lot of jobs coming to Berkeley County.”

  • Letter: Here’s how NFL players could make a real difference

    President Trump should not have involved himself in the NFL players’ protest. In doing so, he became part of the problem instead of part of the solution.
    I personally disagree with the means of player protest, but I support their right to peacefully protest. None of our citizens should be required to honor the flag. We are not North Korea.

  • Column: Time for a leadership transition in S.C. and for New Democrats

    In the Chinese language, the symbol is the same for crisis and opportunity. For both the state of South Carolina and for the Democratic Party – this truly is a time of both crisis and opportunity.

    First our state’s crisis. Anyone who reads a newspaper knows our state is at the beginning of a political corruption and ethics crisis the likes of which we have not seen in a generation. And add to this the huge, related $9 billion nuclear scandal with SCANA, Santee Cooper and the legislature.

  • Letter: No need for protection against disagreement

    “I don’t agree with what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it.”

    Professor Eric P. Robinson’s thoughtful and well-written guest column last Friday brought those historic words to mind. Unfortunately, they appear to have been forgotten or disregarded in the current social-political debate.

    Some people, notably on our college campuses, seem to believe it is not only their right but their duty to shout down and/or intimidate those whose views they find offensive.