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Today's Opinions

  • IL growth boom worrisome

    I am really concerned about the big growth boom in Indian Land.

    Approved new developments coming include:

    u Queensbridge – 234 apartments and 249 homes on Collins Road

    u Retreat at Rayfield – 383 homes

    u Ansley Park – 36 homes and 130 townhomes on U.S. 521

    u Enclave at Bailes Ridge – 246 apartments on S.C. 160

    u Tree Tops – 800 homes, Van Wyck Road

    u Doby’s Bridge – 145 townhomes

    u Estates of Audubon Lakes – 125 homes at Barberville Road

  • Writer compels Haley to fix roads

    Editor’s note: Following is a copy of letter Lancaster resident Thaddeus Sexton Jr. sent to S.C. Gov. Nikki Haley.

    Dear Gov. Haley,

    Rowell Road in Lancaster County is only 2.3 miles long. There are about 40 houses on the road and it is one of the major roads, which lead to Tabernacle United Methodist Church. I’ve included some pictures that were taken recently to show the condition of the road.

  • Putin’s takeover akin to Hitler’s?

    Alice in Wonderland may forever give up her looking glass, because nothing in her world makes sense any longer.

    Oh, my! I must be living in Wonderland, because the same thing is happening in my world.

    How do the civilized nations of this world allow the Russian president to do as he pleases and do nothing but shake the proverbial big stick back at him?

    Here is a fictional scenario:

    PUTIN: I am reclaiming Crimea, because ethnic Russians want to come home.

    WORLD: OK, as long as you stop there.

  • Articles bring back cherished memories of Main Street

    I spent a delightful Sunday afternoon revisiting Main Street thanks to Cherry Doster’s and Cole Waddell’s reflections in their articles, “Town used to mean Main Street,” in the March 23 edition of The Lancaster News. While looking longingly at the photos (courtesy of Travis Bell), it was once again one of those lovely Saturdays when we went “to town.”

  • Transparency a key to quality government

    Each year, the week that includes March 16 is designated as “Sunshine Week.”

    It’s a time to remind government officials about the laws that govern them, laws that require meetings to be held in the open and public records to be made available to citizens. Sunshine Week aims to advance the idea that government works best when the sun is permitted to shine in.

  • Doing right thing hard in S.C.

    We in South Carolina love our history. As William Faulkner said of the South, “The past is never dead. It’s not even past.”

    Lately I have been reading a wonderful book about our state’s past – and clearly there are lessons to be learned.

    The book is Deliver Us from Evil, by Dr. Lacy K. Ford, and it’s about how the South, especially South Carolina, dealt with the issue of slavery from the time of the drafting of the U.S. Constitution until the days prior to the Civil War.

  • Free speech is not subsidized speech

    Curiously, one of the most debated items in the entire S.C. House budget process was a combined $70,000 reduction in appropriations to the College of Charleston and the University of South Carolina Upstate. $70,000 is an utterly trivial part of a $25 billion budget, but the reason for the reduction is what raised the ire of many House members.

  • Harsh winter to blame for pot hole problems

    I share letter writer Pete Melton’s concern about our roads. The problem is due to nature. Rain falls and water settles into small cracks in the road surface. The water freezes and expands and the small cracks become big holes.

    And this cycle will occur over and over, as we have seen during this terrible winter. I don’t blame our officials. I think they do what they can. 

    Bob Summer

    Lancaster