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Today's Opinions

  • Column: Ratcheting up legal sanctions on gun violence

    I know my community expects harsher sentences in gun cases. Sometimes we expect more than the law allows.

    Clint Eastwood said, “A man has got to know his limitations.” I know the limitations of the current gun laws in South Carolina, and unfortunately they are not in our favor.

  • Letter: Jerell White’s family thanks the community

    Editor’s note: Jerell White, a Benedict College student home on summer break, disappeared after walking away from a party in the Primus community early July 5. His body was found in a nearby pond after a four-day search.


    The family of Jerell Ketron Eugene White would like to thank everyone who has shown support throughout this process.

    There are really no words to express our heartfelt thanks for the sympathy and support everyone has extended toward our family during this time of loss.

  • Column: A big nuke-plant mess to unbuild

    The announcement last week that SCE&G and state-owned utility Santee Cooper were pulling the plug on construction of two nuclear reactors in Jenkinsville has left questions that keep multiplying.

    In the run-up to the decision, one factor driving it was that the partly-completed, multibillion-dollar project would provide more power than electricity consumers in South Carolina were likely to want.

    Canceling the project, though, could lead to a shortfall.

  • Column: GOP says Probate backlog alarming

    Three years ago, Lancaster County Republicans, seeking to improve the level of service in county government, fielded a candidate for probate judge.
    Jerry Holt lost in a close race to a two-decade Democratic incumbent. Holt challenged the status quo in the probate court, calling for reforms in the office to improve service, make the office more customer-friendly and prepare for the county’s continued growth.
    According to recent court statistics, these reforms are needed now more than ever.

  • Column: Will mammals soon choose to be reptiles?

    Suppose you do not believe in God, or in any god at all.
    Maybe you believe the universe and everything in it, including yourself, resulted from pure chance or maybe a serious accident of nature. Maybe you believe that everything is utterly devoid of meaning. It is all your choice.

  • Letter: Is Mr. Peanut better off without my existential thoughts?

    As I took my dog, Mr. Peanut, for a walk today and as he stopped to do his ritual sniffing every couple steps, I looked around me. I was amazed at my surroundings. How incredible everything is.
    I stand there, a self-aware being, among trees, grass, clouds, air and other self-aware humans. How is it my surroundings, the planet, the solar system, the galaxy and the universe came to be? Was it because of a supreme being we call God, or was it because of numerical chance? An answer I’ll never know until my time here is up, and maybe not even then.

  • Column: My pessimism about Congress keeps growing

    I have been watching the actions in Washington for the past several weeks with great interest and have come to some conclusions.
    First, regardless of how you feel about Donald Trump, he has been the catalyst to prove what we have suspected about our government – that we the people have very little control of the “government by the people.” We are the “sheeple” that are needed to justify career politicians’ existence.

  • Column: Why tax credits are a bad idea

    Tax credits can be some of the worst policies a government can pass.
    Taxes, as a rule, should be broad-based (everybody pays them) and low-rate (nobody pays much). Tax credits usually violate that principle – after all, tax cuts are different from tax favors. The former lower the overall burden for everyone, and the latter make exemptions for favored businesses, individuals, or sectors at the expense of everyone else.
    And of course, targeted tax credits are often used for economic development – or so the claim goes.