Today's Opinions

  • Let’s be more tolerant of political differences

    While surfing through Facebook, I came across some humorous definitions that I wanted to share. I don’t know who wrote them.
    ◆ Socialist: You have two cows. The government takes one and gives it to your neighbor.
    ◆ Democrat: You have two cows. Your neighbor has none. You feel guilty for being successful. You vote people into office who tax your cows, forcing you to sell one to pay your taxes. The people you voted for then take the tax money and buy a cow and give it to your neighbor. You feel righteous.

  • Box city: Fundraising and raising awareness for homeless

    Recently, my church, Wade Memorial Presbyterian, joined the Lancaster Area Coalition for the Homeless, HOPE of Lancaster Inc. and the Lancaster County Council on Aging to help raise money for the homeless here.
    I asked if anyone would like to spend the night and sleep like the homeless do. I was able to turn in $70 in donations. My son, Sam, agreed to represent his church, St. Luke United Methodist Church, and do this with me. On Sept. 25, we both slept inside a cardboard box at the fairgrounds, where it rained most of the night.

  • Sideline report on the political game

    The workings of a legislature can appear mysterious to those watching in person or at home. While the minutia of political issues is sometimes described as “inside baseball”, the game more closely resembles a defensive struggle in football. Taking that analogy further, one could characterize the four main issues the S.C. Senate dealt with this year as resulting in a touchdown, a field goal, a punt and an overtime period no one saw coming. Here I’ll break down those issues and tell you my position on each, along with what resulted.

  • Economic growth should start on Main Street

    What’s going on with Economic Development? County Council has kicked that dog and nary a bark is heard. For some time, through opinion pieces, I have urged folks to express their feelings about stuff going on and stuff sitting in limbo.
    When I travel down Main Street, tears come to my eyes ‘cause I remember when it was a beehive of commerce. Sure, we got some merchants doing their best to get things going again, but empty storefronts cast a gloom.

  • County churches invited to sheriff’s security seminar

    For the Christian, our eternal security is in our Savior and Lord Jesus Christ. It is God’s will for each one of us to have this assurance.

  • Junkyard organizers praise volunteers

    Organizers of Mahaffey’s Haunted Junkyard would like to personally thank the volunteers who helped with this year’s event. We could not have made this event possible if not for the volunteers — from the scarers to all members who helped at the front.

    They all made a great difference in raising money for such a great cause as Toys for Tots. We would also like to thank the members of the Marine Corps League Detachment No. 1169. They did their part in making all four nights of the hayride run smooth.

  • Intersection more scary than Chaney’s

    Don McCorkle has sort of “unearthed” some tales about old Milt Chaney and his tavern at the intersection of 521 and 75.

    Ghostly apparitions are bound to appear if all the folklore has any substance. I guess Milt kept the light on for early travelers in passing stagecoaches.

    I, as a boy, visited the site when the old inn was still a crumbling shack. To tell the truth, it didn’t grab me as something highly unusual. We didn’t have those electronic metal detectors, but did our best to scrape around for gold pieces.

  • Stranded driver grateful to helpful couple

    I would like to thank some very special people, who on Halloween evening took the time to stop and rescue me from a very deep ditch that I had unfortunately driven into. They reported the occurrence and set to work evaluating the situation and determining the best way to safely remove me from the vehicle and return the car to the road.

    Mr. and Mrs. Jim Sellers proved to me that there are still people who care for others and I would like to thank them for bringing a warm feeling to my heart and a renewed faith in my fellow citizens to our town.

    Sandy Bafundo