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Today's Opinions

  • Column: Santee Cooper board seems to be sleepwalking at state expense

    Chairman Russell Ott appeared frustrated sitting across from outgoing Santee Cooper CEO Lonnie Carter during last week’s House Utility Ratepayer Protection Committee hearing.
    “So you don’t know why the board’s not here?” asked Ott.
    “I didn’t know they were invited. I don’t think they knew they were invited,” replied Carter.
    “I don’t think that’s correct,” said Ott.

  • Letter: Concern about plans for library

    Thanks to Richard Band’s letter to the editor, we now know some of the hazards that patrons of our library will face if it is moved.
    Can you imagine a mother with small children walking from the parking area up to the library? What about teenagers and adults walking alone or senior citizens with limited walking ability?
    Have any of the council or library board members walked the distance?
    Probably not, or this decision would not be under consideration. Why can’t the library be improved where it is?

  • Publisher's Column: We are your ‘Main Street media’

    Editor’s note: Susan Rowell last week became president of the National Newspaper Association, which represents community newspapers nationwide. Here are excerpts of her acceptance speech at the NNA’s annual convention in Tulsa, Okla.

    I am beyond honored to join this group of individuals who have led the National Newspaper Association to where we are today. Over 2,000 members strong, representing communities from the East Coast to the West Coast.

  • Column: Sentencing in nonviolent drug cases needs change

    I joined a bipartisan group of senators Oct. 4 to introduce the Sentencing Reform and Corrections Act of 2017, which would recalibrate prison sentences for nonviolent drug offenders, target violent and career criminals and save taxpayer dollars.
    The legislation permits more judicial discretion at sentencing for offenders with minimal criminal histories and helps inmates successfully reenter society, while tightening penalties for violent criminals and preserving key prosecutorial tools for law enforcement.

  • Letter: Treasurer offers e-check option

    Part of keeping the Lancaster County Treasurer’s Office taxpayer-friendly is coming up with new ways to make customer service faster, friendlier and more cost-effective.

  • Staff Column: Let’s name new school after Charlie Duke

    Naming a new public building is a chance to celebrate something we’re proud of.
    Next August, a new elementary school will be opening in Lancaster County. And if the committee assigned with choosing a name is fishing for ideas, I have a suggestion.
    It should be named Charlie Duke Elementary School to honor our homegrown Apollo 16 astronaut.
    Twelve men have left footprints on the moon. Duke, who celebrated his 82nd birthday Tuesday, is one of them. He logged 71 hours on the lunar surface in April 1972.

  • Staff Column: Let’s name new school after Charlie Duke

    Naming a new public building is a chance to celebrate something we’re proud of.
    Next August, a new elementary school will be opening in Lancaster County. And if the committee assigned with choosing a name is fishing for ideas, I have a suggestion.
    It should be named Charlie Duke Elementary School to honor our homegrown Apollo 16 astronaut.
    Twelve men have left footprints on the moon. Duke, who celebrated his 82nd birthday Tuesday, is one of them. He logged 71 hours on the lunar surface in April 1972.

  • Staff Column: Let’s name new school after Charlie Duke

    Naming a new public building is a chance to celebrate something we’re proud of.
    Next August, a new elementary school will be opening in Lancaster County. And if the committee assigned with choosing a name is fishing for ideas, I have a suggestion.
    It should be named Charlie Duke Elementary School to honor our homegrown Apollo 16 astronaut.
    Twelve men have left footprints on the moon. Duke, who celebrated his 82nd birthday Tuesday, is one of them. He logged 71 hours on the lunar surface in April 1972.