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Our View

  • Thanks to Band for outstanding job at library

    Richard Band devoted 35 years to the Lancaster County Library and it’s likely his legacy will be felt for years to come.
    Band, 64, retired May 31 after spending nearly half of his life improving and expanding the Lancaster County Library system.
    Band’s impact is obvious.
    “When I came, we had no branches and were only open one night a week,” Band said. “We had a big old card catalog in the middle of the room with 40,000 cards that took up all the room. There wasn’t a lot of technology.”

  • Be prepared for hurricanes

    On May 20, we were reminded that natural disasters of all kinds can bring devastation on a massive scale. In just a few seconds, the lives of Moore, Okla., residents were changed by an EF5 tornado that destroyed entire buildings while injuring or killing residents as they took shelter.
    We can’t prevent natural disasters, but we can prepare for them. By being ready and knowing what to do in a disaster, we can minimize risk, reduce the time it takes to recover and most importantly, prevent the loss of life.

  • Congrats to Class of 2013

    Take a good look at the Graduation 2013 special section. It’s full of the graduates from all four county high schools.
    Today, about 787 Lancaster County students will march across four graduation stages to receive their high school diplomas.
    Later, they’ll flip the tassels on their mortarboards as they celebrate their graduation with the friends, family, teachers and administrators who helped them along the way.  

  • Half-staff flags reflect true cost of freedom

    Occasionally The Lancaster News receives an email from Gov. Nikki Haley’s office announcing that flags across the state will be flown at half-staff on a certain day.
    Often the reason is because a South Carolina soldier has been killed in action, usually in Iraq or Afghanistan. We post those announcements on our website.
    Those half-staff flags are reminders of why we observe Memorial Day. It is so easy to get caught up in the celebration of the holiday with picnics, cookouts and get-togethers that we forget just why there is a Memorial Day.

  • Deserving honorees

    The 2013 Celebration of Excellence, the annual Lancaster County School District’s salute to the best in education and service, included its annual induction of hall of fame members.
    Four deserving individuals, who made an impact in the classroom and beyond, took center stage on Monday, April 29, at the Lancaster Golf Club’s Fairway Room.
    The latest inductees included Bennett Gunter, C.C. Hanson, Ann Hough and Floyd White.

  • Walnut Creek Park a welcome addition

    After more than four years of waiting, the excitement was palpable as Lancaster County officials cut the ribbon April 24 to officially open Walnut Creek Park.
    The event, originally slated for last October, but delayed due to legal issues, drew local officials and residents, all eager to see the new 60-acre, $7 million county park complex in Indian Land.

  • Jacobus leaving impressive legacy

    When the 2012-13 school year ends at Indian Land High School, it will mark the end of an era.
    For the last 20 years, well over the span of a school career for a student from kindergarten to graduation, Tamara Jacobus has been teaching and coaching at the Lancaster County Class AA high school.
    When the ILHS doors close at the end of the month, Jacobus will be leaving for the final time.

  • Support needed in battle with cancer

    It’s an ominous sight. The flickering glow from the candle-lit bags illuminate the night. On this night they are a visual reminder of those who either lost their battle with cancer or still doing battle.
    The dreadful disease is no respecter of persons and we all know someone – from all walks of life – who have dealt with it or are still dealing with it.

  • Kershaw honors its civic leaders

    A host of deserving people were in the spotlight at the Kershaw Chamber of Commerce’s annual banquet at the Kershaw Country Club.
    The awards are a way to honor those who are making a positive impact on business, industry and life in the southern Lancaster County town.
    Beverly Timmons was presented with the chamber’s highest award. Previously known as the Citizen of the Year award, it is now called the President’s Award.
    The award is presented to a Kershaw citizen who has significantly contributed to the betterment of the community.

  • B-3 zoning is on the table again

    Well, it’s about time Lancaster County Council finally took up the controversial issue of B-3 commercial zoning again.
    Since council lifted the Panhandle’s moratorium on B-3 zoning last June (five days before it was set to expire anyway), the issue had been dead in the water, despite several Panhandle residents’ strident calls to bring it back to council’s attention.