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Our View

  • No resident should be a prisoner in own home

    Imagine looking out the window of your home and watching a drug transaction in your front yard. Imagine standing helplessly by as neighborhood thugs laugh and take your furniture from your porch. Imagine an elderly widow cowering in her living room as teens pummel her house with rocks and mock her.
    You don’t have to imagine these scenes. They’re real. They happen almost every day in certain areas of the county, specifically the city of Lancaster.

  • Gamecock fever cures ills

    During the final week of June in the Palmetto State, the health of a large majority of state residents was likely greatly impacted.
    For sure there was sleep deprivation, not to mention some rising stress levels and skipping heartbeats.
    S.C. Sen. John Courson (R-Richland County), who noted he takes blood pressure medication, said another night might likely had done him in. He added quite likely the next day would have brought a vacant senate seat in the state legislature.

  • Don’t let heat ruin summer for you

    We really don’t need the temperature, heat index and ozone forecast to tell us it’s hot. All we have to do is step outside and get slapped with heat and humidity.
    Weather forecasters could just hit rewind each morning for the next couple of months. But that is to be expected because it is summer – the time of the year that allows us to do so much of what we love to do outdoors – play ball, swim, camp, cook out and much, much more.

  • Be safe, have fun on Fourth of July

    The United States of America will celebrate its 235th birthday on the Fourth of July. And since Independence Day falls on a Monday this year, most of us will have a long weekend to enjoy the federal holiday.
    The midsummer holiday commemorates the adoption of the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776, declaring America’s independence from Great Britain.
    It is a day of celebration, from the backyard to the pool, river or beach. Popular forms of celebration and observance include picnics, parades, cookouts, concerts, baseball games and family reunions.

  • Recycling will ease our landfill woes

    Some issues we report on remind us of the arcade game, Whack-a-Mole. Take landfills, for example. This year, landfill issues have been big news in Lancaster County.

  • Visit both courthouses on Sunday

    Area residents are in for a treat. In between Father’s Day and the annual weekend of July Fourth celebrations is a significant date in Lancaster County.
    The grand opening for the new Lancaster County Courthouse is 2 to 5 p.m Sunday.
    The event is open to the public and area residents are encouraged to attend the grand opening.

  • Now is time to voice opinion on tax hikes

    Lancaster County Council will hold its final vote Monday, June 27, on the county’s 2011-12 budget.
    The $33,333,179 budget includes tax hikes of 1.2 mills in the county’s general fund, a one-tenth of a mill increase in the University of South Carolina Lancaster fund and an increase of $5 in the county road fee.

  • Fathers provide foundation for families

    Depending on which historical version you believe, the origin of Father’s Day was based on the same premise – since there was a special day to honor mothers, father ought to have a day, also.
    Sonora Smart Dodd is the name most associated with the origin of the special day. Dodd was listening to a Mother’s Day sermon in 1909 when she came up with the idea. Her own father was the inspiration behind the idea. He was a Civil War veteran who raised six children on his own after his wife died.

  • Mosier was invaluable to district

    Lancaster County District Superintendent Gene Moore knows a good thing when he sees it and doesn’t mind saying so.

    He’s emphatic about retiring Superintendent Administrative Assistant JoAnne Mosier, noting the 34-year employee as one of the “best things about coming to Lancaster County as superintendent.”

    In her final 13 years at her job, Mosier also worked with former superintendents John Taylor and Dr. Pat Burns.

    No matter who the superintendent was, Mosier worked with the same dedicated approach.

  • Are we now clawing our way out of recession?

    Our economy is chugging along and will continue to do so for a while. That’s what a national economist told Lancaster County residents last month.
    That bit of information was no real revelation for any of us. The signs of a sluggish economy – a stagnant real estate market with an abundance of homes for sale (many foreclosed), county unemployment rate of about 13.9 percent and an increase in numbers of people who need help with life’s basic needs – have been apparent for while. And it doesn’t appear to be getting better anytime soon.