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Our View

  • Our View: Don’t play shell game with taxes

    Tax hikes and fee increases have been in the news a lot lately, as they always are this time of year. All across the county, residents are learning they will have to pay more in taxes and fees in the upcoming year.
    Lancaster County School District recently approved a 5-mill tax increase, which will cost the average Lancaster County homeowner about $20 more this year.
    The town of Kershaw’s budget includes a 1.2-mill tax hike, which will cost its homeowners $4.80 more in yearly taxes on a $100,000 home. It also increased its water and sewer bill by $7.

  • Make a big difference by helping with HOPE

    HOPE needs help. Helping Other People Effectively (HOPE) of Lancaster aids the community through its roster of caring volunteers.
    HOPE in Lancaster Inc. is a faith-based, nonprofit organization that provides short-term emergency assistance to those in crisis.
    HOPE has a crisis of its own. During the summer months, volunteer help tends to drop a bit with helpers taking vacation.
    At the same time, those in need, no matter the situation, need assistance.
    The clients can’t wait as their plight never takes time off.

  • Youth Serve needs our help with its program

    Donna Hartley was pleasantly surprised when she opened the door to her office Monday morning. Hartley, executive director of Kershaw Area Resource Exchange (KARE), said there were three checks targeted for Youth Serve.
    Youth Serve is a program that recruits teenagers to help repair area homes for the needy and elderly, who are unable to do the repairs themselves.
    Youth Serve is a part of KARE, which provides an array of services to people in the southern portion of Lancaster County.

  • Dr. Adams dedicated to helping other folks

    Lancaster County lost a true humanitarian with the recent death of Dr. Ira Adams.
    Ironically, Dr. Adams died earlier this month at his Meeting Street office, where he toiled tirelessly to help his patients have a better quality of life.
    Adams enjoyed his work and had a passion for helping others, whether it was in his Lancaster office or in a foreign county.
    Adams often took his practice to countries such as Mexico and Guatemala, where it was common for him to work until his supplies were exhausted.

  • Mobley is right choice for USC trustees

    What might have been a possible negative result with the election of Greg Gregory to the S.C. Senate has become a real positive for Lancaster County.
    Last spring when Gregory was elected to the state senate, Lancaster County was able to hold its long link to the coveted seat in the state Legislature.
    At the same time, Gregory, with his return to the state Senate, had to yield his post on the University of South Carolina Board of Trustees.

  • More work needed to reduce U.S. obesity rate

    Efforts to reduce obesity in the U.S. are making some progress, but, as a nation we continue to pack on the pounds and put our overall health at risk.

    A report out last week from the Trust For America’s Health and Robert Wood Johnson Foundation noted that every state except Colorado has an obesity rate of 20 percent or more. 

  • Saying hello, goodbye to leaders at Arts Council

    The Lancaster County Council of the Arts has seen a lot of changes lately. 

    Last month, executive director Sam Courtney, who led the council for the past six years, announced that he was resigning. This month, Debbie Jaillette stepped into the executive director’s role.

    The Arts Council, located in the old Springs House on Gay Street, promotes the arts in Lancaster County by providing educational opportunities for students and various programming for the general public, among other services. 

  • No resident should be a prisoner in own home

    Imagine looking out the window of your home and watching a drug transaction in your front yard. Imagine standing helplessly by as neighborhood thugs laugh and take your furniture from your porch. Imagine an elderly widow cowering in her living room as teens pummel her house with rocks and mock her.
    You don’t have to imagine these scenes. They’re real. They happen almost every day in certain areas of the county, specifically the city of Lancaster.

  • Gamecock fever cures ills

    During the final week of June in the Palmetto State, the health of a large majority of state residents was likely greatly impacted.
    For sure there was sleep deprivation, not to mention some rising stress levels and skipping heartbeats.
    S.C. Sen. John Courson (R-Richland County), who noted he takes blood pressure medication, said another night might likely had done him in. He added quite likely the next day would have brought a vacant senate seat in the state legislature.

  • Don’t let heat ruin summer for you

    We really don’t need the temperature, heat index and ozone forecast to tell us it’s hot. All we have to do is step outside and get slapped with heat and humidity.
    Weather forecasters could just hit rewind each morning for the next couple of months. But that is to be expected because it is summer – the time of the year that allows us to do so much of what we love to do outdoors – play ball, swim, camp, cook out and much, much more.